Sep
1
to Sep 30

Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color

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Saturated: The Allure and Science of Color 

Saturated explores the elusive, complex phenomenon of color perception and how it has captivated artists, designers, scientists, and sages. Featuring over 190 objects spanning antiquity to the present from the extraordinary collections of Smithsonian Libraries and Cooper Hewitt, the exhibition reveals how designers apply the theories of the world’s greatest color thinkers to bring order and excitement to the visual world.

he works of color innovators, such as Louis Comfort Tiffany, Massimo Vignelli, and Hella Jongerius, demonstrate design’s continuing investigation of new materials, technologies, and techniques, while recent acquisitions for the collection point to future directions.

 

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Sample, Decor I Series, Square, 1969 cotton. This object was made by Mira-X International Furnishings, Inc.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

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Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

The Costume Institute's spring 2018 exhibition—at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters—features a dialogue between fashion and medieval art from The Met collection to examine fashion's ongoing engagement with the devotional practices and traditions of Catholicism.

Serving as the cornerstone of the exhibition, papal robes and accessories from the Sistine Chapel sacristy, many of which have never been seen outside The Vatican, are on view in the Anna Wintour Costume Center. Fashions from the early twentieth century to the present are shown in the Byzantine and medieval galleries, part of the Robert Lehman Wing, and at The Met Cloisters.

#MetHeavenlyBodies

@ The Met Fifth Avenue & @ The Met Cloisters

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Color Decoded: The Textiles of Richard Landis

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Color Decoded: The Textiles of Richard Landis

Color Decoded: The Textiles of Richard Landis celebrates the recent acquisition of six of Landis’s most important works for Cooper Hewitt’s collection, installed together with three process drawings and 13 more of Landis’s textiles, and all produced between 1967 and 1995. The drawings demonstrate how Landis would calculate and visualize every permutation possible within a defined set of colors. While the actual weaving could be completed in days, it sometimes took Landis a month or more to work out the full range of tones and hues on paper, design the geometric pattern, and prepare the loom to weave the cloth.  Using his preferred weave structure—double-cloth—Landis would simultaneously weave two parallel planes of fabric,  a technique that allowed for the creation of the multicolored complex patterning of his textiles. The remarkable intricacy, dynamism, and luminosity found in works such as Campo di Fiori (1976), Untitled (1982), and Nines (1995) show a designer working at the height of his creative powers.

Richard Landis (American, born 1931) is a master weaver who pursued a nearly lifelong investigation of pattern and color. His double-cloth textiles are complex systems of closely related full-tones and half-tones of color, organized into abstract geometries of endless variation. In Landis’s weavings, small, medium, and large rectangles and squares repeat in ever-changing order, and every possible color combination is played out both horizontally and vertically. What appears to be a random arrangement of colored squares is a balanced and controlled expression of a well-modulated palette.

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Mercerized cotton double weave 46.4 × 30.8 cm (18 1/4 × 12 1/8 in.) Courtesy of the Frederick and Frances Sommer Foundation Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Infinity of Nations Exhibition

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Infinity of Nations Exhibition

This spectacular, permanent exhibition of some 700 works of Native art from throughout North, Central, and South America demonstrates the breadth of the museum's renowned collection and highlights the historic importance of many of these iconic objects, including dozens of textile works.

Chosen to illustrate the geographic and chronological scope of the museum's collection, Infinity of Nations opens with a display of headdresses. Signifying the sovereignty of Native nations, these works include a magnificent Kayapó krok-krok-ti, a macaw-and-heron-feather ceremonial headdress.

Focal-point objects, representing each region, include an Apsáalooke (Crow) robe illustrated with warriors' exploits; a detailed Mayan limestone bas relief depicting a ball player; an elaborately beaded Inuit tuilli, or woman's inner parka, made for the mother of a newborn baby; a Mapuche kultrung, or hand drum, depicting the cosmos; a carved and painted chief's headdress, depicting a killer whale with a raven emerging from its back, created and worn by Willie Seaweed (Kwakwaka'wakw); an anthropomorphic Shipibo joni chomo, or water vessel from Peru; a Chumash basket decorated with a Spanish-coin motif; an ancient mortar from Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M.; a gourd carved with a detailed picture of the Battle of Arica by Mariano Flores Kananga (Quechua); and an early Anishinaabe man's outfit complete with headdress, leggings, shirt, sash, and jewelry. The exhibition concludes with works by Native artists including Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache) and Rick Bartow (Mad River Wiyot).

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

History Refused to Die

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History Refused to Die

This exhibition presents thirty paintings, sculptures, drawings, and quilts by self-taught contemporary African American artists to celebrate the 2014 gift to The Metropolitan Museum of Art of works of art from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. The artists represented by this generous donation all hail from the American South.

History Refused to Die features the mixed-media art of Thornton Dial (1928–2016)—whose monumental assemblage from 2004 provides the exhibition's title—and a selection of the renowned quilts from Gee's Bend, Alabama, by quilters such as Annie Mae Young (1928–2012), Lucy Mingo (born 1931), Loretta Pettway (born 1942), and additional members of the extended Pettway family. Among other accomplished artists to be featured are Nellie Mae Rowe (1900–1982), Lonnie Holley (born 1950), and Ronald Lockett (1965–1988).

Remarkably diverse in media and technique, the works in this exhibition nonetheless suggest their makers' cultural and aesthetic kinship through the use of found and repurposed materials. Their subjects are likewise varied, rooted in personal history and experience, regional identity—particularly common legacies of slavery and post-Reconstruction histories of oppression under the Black Codes and Jim Crow laws—in addition to national and international events.

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Housetop and Bricklayer with Bars quilt Lucy T. Pettway (American, Boykin, Alabama 1921–2004 Boykin, Alabama)

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care

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Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care

Los Angeles–based artist and designer Tanya Aguiñiga has established herself as a crucial voice working at the intersection of fiber art, design, social practice, and activism. Her work, ranging from her “Performance Crafting” series—which uses craft to generate dialogues about identity, culture, and gender—to furniture whose material and form reimagine its functionality to provide “support,” shows a commitment to design thinking as political. At the heart of her practice is an inquiry into how community is created, and the role that craft, design, and materiality play in its formation.

Founded by Aguiñiga and launched in 2015, AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides) is a long-term initiative that activates sites along the US–Mexico border through collaborative art-making and storytelling projects. Started as a month-long activation at the San Ysidro border crossing in Tijuana, it has evolved its focus to record and paint a picture of life along the length of the border. To date, AMBOS, in collaboration with artists and community organizations working with border issues/themes, has produced programs along the border between the United States and Mexico, stopping at thirteen US/Mexico ports of entry, and crossing a total of forty times. 

Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care will be on view in the second-floor gallery.

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Installation view of 'Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care'  
Photo by Jenna Bascom
Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

The Secret Life of Textiles: The Milton Sonday Archive

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The Secret Life of Textiles: The Milton Sonday Archive

Textile scholar Milton Sonday is one of the world's foremost authorities on the structures of handmade fabrics, particularly woven textiles and lace. Hired in 1962 by the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., as a draftsman for a project on Precolumbian ceramics, he was promoted shortly thereafter to assistant curator responsible for carpets. In 1967, he joined the curatorial staff of the Cooper Hewitt Museum. Early in his career, Sonday began to put his artistic skills to use in creating legible and visually pleasing technical drawings that express the weaves of patterned textiles. He went on to teach seminars on fabric analysis, developing various methods that enabled students (even those who claimed they "couldn't draw") to re-create and therefore understand the structures of historical textiles.

This installation includes a selection of Sonday's studies of lace structures and couched embroidery, loom models for patterned weaves, and diagrams made from classic handwoven textiles. His clear, comprehensible, and attractive drawings and models have become more than didactic tools. The wit and imagination evident in Sonday's choices of materials and colors and the skill with which the works are made has inspired delight and appreciation over the years.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Palpable Colo

Object Of The Day: Palpable Color

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Author: Janice Lessman-Moss

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This stunning textile represents a successful integration of the handweaver’s sensibility with the power and versatility of electronic jacquard technology. It was created by Patricia Kinsella in 1991 when she was a member of the Muller Zell Jacquard Project, an opportunity for invited weavers to explore and develop work in an industrial setting with the support of the Muller Zell textile company in Germany.

The weaving presents a dramatic composition activated by columnar shapes with jagged contours, that establish an interesting interplay of figure and ground. The relatively flat dark shadowy forms, containing subtle shifts of dark blue hue in a weft dominant twill, contrast with the bright warmth of the summery sunset colors of the patterned ground. Some of the horizontal stripes, anchor the composition with a tactile and visual solidity echoing architectural divisions/appointments like window panes, while other stripes blend softly with one another in an atmospheric glow. By contrast, the vertical stripes of the warp appear fragmented as they define the surface of the randomly placed diagonally oriented organic figures that resemble gestural brush strokes. The squiggly raised lines that appear in these directional shapes of warp dominant satin, are determined by a dominant weft weave structure that adds an interesting textural detail and quality of connection with the ground plane. The warp stripes appear in faint echoes throughout the entire field in a beautiful example of optical color blending.

While the color is clearly the main player in the composition, the selection of weave structures beautifully emphasizes the physicality of the plane. The relief surface provides a haptic enticement to the graphic appeal of the design. Satins produce a slightly raised reflective surface, while the twills enliven the ground and the columns with directional movement, exhibiting the regularly spaced diagonal repetition that is a foil to the various angles, and curvilinear edges which define the shapes. The horizontal and vertical stripes, visually weave in and out of space and provide a macrocosmic reiteration of the microcosmic grid of the warp and weft axes.

Kinsella had previously been immersed in the creation of unique complex hand weavings that contained a similar vocabulary of marks, patterns, colors and textures. They were rich in spatial and associative intrigue, referencing maps and fractals while emphasizing the axes of weaving through selective gradations of color in both the warp and weft. The color play juxtaposed smooth and abrupt relationships throughout the field causing the ground shapes or patterns to recede and advance in unexpected passages throughout the composition.

When invited to participate in the Muller Zell project that allowed her to create this weaving in the Cooper Hewitt collection, she had to switch gears and recalled the challenge of the experience to me in our recent email conversation. Because her hand woven pieces were all singular conceptual objects, she wanted this jacquard textile to retain some of that unique character by avoiding a strongly defined repeat. She was able to create a design with a very large repeat that it is difficult to discern at first glance. Primarily she was interested in maintaining the “palpable physicality of color” that characterized her handwoven work. To this end, she did some sampling on her hand loom with yarns of her own choosing to explore color, texture and structural/weave options. She then had Muller Zell wind a special warp for her weavings that contained multiple warp stripes arranged to her specifications. In the weft, she used the maximum rotation of colors capable of being handled by the electronic loom – even having yarns plied specially for her to obtain the blending of color that was essential to her design. Kinsella was pleased with the results and I too find them beautiful and effective!

Janice Lessman-Moss is a weaver and professor of textiles in the School of Art at Kent State University.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu

Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu

For millennia, ancient peoples of the Andes created quipus—complex record-keeping devices, made of knotted cords, that served as an essential medium for reading and writing, registering and remembering. New York–based Chilean artist and poet Cecilia Vicuña has devoted a significant part of her artistic practice to studying, interpreting, and reactivating the quipus, which were banned by the Spanish during their colonization of South America. Drawing on her indigenous heritage, Vicuña channels this ancient, sensorial mode of communication into immersive installations and participatory performances.

Disappeared Quipu pairs ancient quipus from our collection with a newly commissioned installation by Vicuña that combines monumental strands of knotted wool with a four-channel video projection. Together, these quipus of the past and present explore the nature of language and memory, the resilience of native people in the face of colonial repression, and Vicuña’s own experiences living in exile from her native Chile. Each knot of Vicuña’s modern-day quipus gives radical possibility to the connective and expressive capacities of a language nearly lost to history.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

M'Afrique at Moroso Soho

M'Afrique at Moroso Soho

In an age when all is virtual, and appearance glorified, Moroso goes back to routes of tradition and handcraft with M’Afrique. Started as a social project in Dakar, Africa, in 2009, the handwoven outdoor pieces designed by international talents have become integral part of the brand’s collections. Inspired by local nature and colors, each piece can be replicated but carries the unique of the handcraft process by using traditional fishing cords to weave patterns and structures.

The Moroso showroom will display it’s M’Afrique creations in the flagship showroom located at 146 Greene Street, New York.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863)"

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Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863)

Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863) explores the confluence of art, love, science, and religion in the extraordinary art of Orra White Hitchcock, one of America’s first female scientific illustrators. Her marriage in 1821 to Amherst College professor Edward Hitchcock cemented a years-long friendship and collaboration based on a bedrock of faith and science, mutual respect, close observation, and mental capacity for the largest of ideas. Orra White exhibited a prodigious scientific mind and abundant artistic talent at an early age. The exhibition traces her development from schoolgirl projects to highly accomplished renderings of the natural scenery of the Connecticut River Valley used in her husband’s many geology publications. 

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Mastodon maximus. Cuv. [After Georges Cuvier], Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863), Amherst, Massachusetts, 1828–1840, Pen and ink and watercolor wash on cotton, with woven tape binding, 25 1/2 x 37",  Amherst College Archives & Special Collections

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Sep
2
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Winter’s Friend

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Object Of The Day: Winter’s Friends

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Author: Janine LeBlanc

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

For some time, I’ve been interested in Japanese textiles and the messages they can convey. In a culture where everyone wore essentially the same T-shaped garment, the difference was in the details: color, materials, motifs, as well as their combinations. Each have specific meaning.

This late Edo era (circa 1800) garment is a kosode or small sleeve-opening kimono. It’s meant to be worn as an outer robe over a formal kimono without the use of an obi or sash. Its red lining is rolled outward over a padded hem, which adds weight and allows the kosode to drape onto the floor like a train. The arrangement of motifs follows the open edges of the kosode, placed along the hem and center front, with a symmetry that is associated with late Edo kimono.

The base fabric is a satin damask weave called rinzu. The basket-woven motif is interrupted by a repeat pattern of cranes and turtles, the geometry contrasting with the organic shapes. The crane and the turtle are both considered symbols of longevity.

This kosode is embroidered with silk floss in a satin stitch and couch-stitched with gold-wrapped thread. The imagery is a combination of plum blossoms, willow and pine motifs called “the three friends of winter.” Plum blossoms bloom in early spring, even in the snow. Willows bend in the wind. The pine tree is always green and will grow on difficult terrain. Together they represent steadfastness, flexibility and tenacity. The kosode is also embroidered with red-crowned cranes, which mate for life and are considered an auspicious motif for marriage.

This kosode also has five kamon, or crests, in a traditional arrangement at chest, center back and center of sleeves; kimonos with five crests are considered the most formal. Kamon were originally created as a way to distinguish Samurai warriors on the battlefield and have become a way of identifying family. The circular crest is also embroidered with gold-wrapped thread. It depicts the swallowtail butterfly used by the Taira family.

This kosode with its red padded hem and auspicious motifs of the crane and three friends of winter can be viewed as a precursor to the contemporary wedding uchikake. All of these elements are still used on formal wedding kimono today, more than 200 years later.

Janine LeBlanc works as a Collections Assistant at the Gregg Museum of Art and Design, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

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Sep
3
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Wearing Wealth

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Object Of The Day: Wearing Wealth

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Author: Sumru Belger Krody

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This robe was once adorned a high official of the court of Bukhara, an ancient city nestled in one of Central Asia’s fertile oases. Surrounded by lush orchards and fields, the city was the center of power for the Manghit dynasty’s Bukharan Khanate from 1785 until the 1920 takeover by the Soviet Union.

Centuries of political turmoil and instability in Central Asia preceding the nineteenth century created an environment that compelled people to accumulate and invest their wealth in portable items such as textiles and jewelry. Textiles were light, made with expensive materials, required costly labor to produce, and did not lose their value.

Central Asian costume in the nineteenth century consisting of layered garments made out of luxurious materials and a variety of headgear, jewelry, ornaments, and accessories, was a feast to the eyes of many travelers to the region. Each garment had myriad bright colors, was cut full, and hung loose with flowing lines. Although our contemporary eyes may consider the resulting silhouette bulky, Central Asian people wore many layers of clothing not only to protect themselves from the elements, but also to show off their wealth, and thus their importance in society. This was the accepted aesthetic of the times.

It could be argued that wearing one’s wealth was the vestige of a nomadic past still lingering among the long settled former nomadic societies. Because textiles meant wealth, they were treated with respect. They were kept in the family, recycled for generations, and when they were constructed, fabrics were minimally cut so there was no waste. This practice follows a pattern well known among many textile-producing cultures, where so much effort goes into making the cloth itself that none is wasted, so people in these societies choose to wear garments that are loosely tailored without any angling and sculpting.

The large size of the robe called chapan and straight cut under the arms indicate that it was made for a man. It is also particularly sumptuous, indicating that wearer had wealth to lavish on a garment such as this. The outer layer of the garment was composed of silk fabric embellished with metallic-wrapped silk supplementary weft yarns creating a sumptuous ogival lattice. Photographs taken in Bukhara and Samarkand in the nineteenth-century, show emirs as well as many high officials such as judges wearing this type of robe.

The lining of the robe is also luxurious ikat fabric. Ikat derives its name from the technique used to decorate fabric, wherein parts of the warp or weft yarns are tightly bound in order to resist dye penetration. The bold and colorful designs of ikat fabrics are created before the yarns are woven into cloth. The colors and design of the ikat used inside of this robe indicate that the fabrics were tailored into a robe in the second half of the nineteenth century and trimmed with silk band all along the edges of the robe.

Sumru Belger Krody is Senior Curator at George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum.

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Sep
3
to Sep 29

Fabrications: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

Fabrications: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

The Milliners Guild is comprised of professional hat makers from around the US. This exhibition will showcase the unique designs of 17 Guild members, each creating a hat using innovative millinery techniques and featuring beautiful textiles from premier NYC Garment District supplier B&J Fabrics. Textile categories will include laces, brocades, tweeds and prints.

The Milliners Guild is a non-profit organization committed to increasing the public profile of millinery as well as the public's awareness and interest in millinery products. Through a collective website, special events and educational seminars the Guild provides communication about this thriving and contemporary industry to the public, press and students of the craft.

Participants:

Kathy Anderson, Linda Ashton, Sally Caswell, Wanda Chambers, Ellen Colon Lugo, Rosael Torres Davis, Laura del Villaggio, Jennifer Hoertz, Lisa McFadden, Karen Morris, Evetta Petty, Lisa Shaub, Judith Solodkin, Monika Stebbins, Mergie Trembley, Barbara Volker 

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Sep
3
to Sep 27

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts

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Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends.

Monday - Thursday, 11am - 5pm.

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Map Quilt, artist unidentified, possibly Virginia, 1886, silk and cotton with silk embroidery, 78 3/4 × 82 1/4 in., gift of Dr. and Mrs. C. David McLaughlin, 1987.1.1. Photo by Schecter Lee.

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Sep
4
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Costumes Normands

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Author: Michele Majer

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This roller-printed furnishing cotton dating about 1827 and depicting young women in “costumes normands” illustrates several aspects of early nineteenth-century French textile production including technique, material, and source of inspiration.

The mechanical innovation of printing on cotton with engraved copper rollers was perfected by the British in the early 1780s and brought to France in 1797 by Christopher Oberkampf, the founder of the renowned printed cotton manufactory in Jouy, outside Paris. Over the next decade, machines were installed in other centers of cotton production including Mulhouse and Nantes. Compared to plate printing that had been in use since the mid-eighteenth century, roller printing was considerably faster, allowing for a significantly larger output in the same amount of time. This, in turn, reduced the costs of and expanded the market for these fabrics that were sought after by middle- and working-class consumers, eager for the latest novelties.

In the second half of the eighteenth century, French manufacturers of printed cottons relied heavily on foreign imports, primarily from Britain and India. However, by the second decade of the nineteenth century, French spinners and weavers were making dress and furnishing cottons in a wider range of qualities and greater quantities than previously. By the mid-1820s, the abundance of domestically produced cottons also contributed to the dramatic increase in consumption and lower prices of this commodity.

Both to entice consumers and in response to their demand, manufacturers offered new designs on a frequent basis. As producers of plate-printed cottons had done in the eighteenth century, firms in the early nineteenth century often drew on engraved sources for inspiration. Historical, biblical, allegorical, mythological, and exotic subjects; scenes from novels, plays, and operas; and genre scenes were all highly popular for furnishing cottons during this period.

Many of the figures in this cotton from the Cooper Hewitt collection derive from an 1827 publication, Costumes des femmes du pays de Caux et de plusieurs autres parties de l’ancienne province de Normandie, that attests to the growing interest in regional traditional dress during the Romantic period. The 105 individual figures in the plates were drawn by the well-known painter and illustrator, Louis-Marie Lanté (1789-1871), and engraved by Georges-Jacques Gatine (ca. 1773-after 1841). Lanté frequently contributed illustrations to the renowned French fashion periodical Journal des Dames et des Modes (1797-1839), that were also engraved by Gatine. In fact, apart from their distinctive, towering headdresses, the young women’s high-waisted dresses with puffed upper sleeves, applied decoration on the bodice and at the hem, and frilled collars are very similar to contemporary fashion plates. Requiring hours of washing, starching, and ironing, the forms of these elaborate headpieces identified the wearer’s town or village in the Norman province. Among Lanté’s figures selected by the cotton’s designer and placed on small islands in groups of two, four, and five are: Cauchoise (Nos. 1 and 9); Costume de Coutances (No. 26); Costume de Rollevilledessiné au Hâvre (No. 36); Costume de Rolleville (No. 37); Costume de Lisieux (No. 40); Costume de Caën (No. 43); Jeune fille de Bayeux (Nos. 49 and 52); and Costume de Saint-Valery en Caux (No. 57). The monochromatic palette (here, sepia colored) is characteristic of roller-printed cottons as is the short repeat, disguised by a dense filling pattern of stylized flowers and foliage.

 

Michele Majer is Assistant Professor at Bard Graduate Center in New York, where she teaches courses in eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century fashion and textiles. In 2012, she curated a BGC Focus Gallery exhibition, Staging Fashion, 1880-1920: Jane Hading, Lily Elsie, Billie Burke, and contributed to and edited the accompanying catalogue. She is also Research Associate at Cora Ginsburg LLC and is a regular contributor to the annual catalogues.

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: A Collector’s Eye

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Object Of The Day: A Collector’s Eye

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Author: Donna Ghelerter

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

Cora Ginsburg, who donated this bedcover to the Cooper Hewitt in 1993, knew a bit about eighteenth-century English embroidery. Over her years as an antique dealer in New York specializing in textiles and clothing, Cora held in her hands many pieces of linen and cotton that previously had passed through the hands of the (mostly) anonymous women who took plain-woven cloth and, with their needles, created decorative fantasies. Who wouldn’t want to sleep, and dream, beneath this one?

A peacock flies with angels. Two cranes stand on a sliver of ground. The bedcover’s central medallion, with its border of flame-like leaves, encapsulates both pleasures and dangers. A branching stalk, sinuously growing carnations and pansies, is superimposed on a landscape where a hillock with a hissing snake and placid deer stretches to a faraway castle, and a sky above fades from early morning to midnight blue.
All is impossible yet fully captures the realm of English embroidery where motifs copied from pattern books, bestiaries, and botanical engravings—such as those I poured over with Cora from her collection, including the 1688 A Treatise on Japanning and Varnishin, by John Stalker and George Parker and those by Margaretha Helm from the early eighteenth century that feature motifs similar to those on this bedcover—gave embroiderers license to play with realities of scale, of East and West, of animals actual and mythological.

Cora donated this bedcover in memory of textile scholar Jean Mailey, who worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Textile Study Room from 1959 to 1985. I write this in memory of Cora, whose observant eye and knowing passion for textiles enrich many museum collections today.

Donna Ghelerter is a textile and fashion historian in New York. In 2017, she published Marguerita Mergentime: American Textiles, Modern Ideas, which highlights Mergentime’s life and career as a textile designer in the 1930s.

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Sep
5
to Oct 7

Matthew Larson: Vice Versa

Vice Versa Matthew Larson

September 5 - October 7, 2018

Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 5th 6:00-8:00pm

Massey Klein is pleased to present Vice Versa, a solo exhibition of new works by Matthew Larson. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York.

Larson's most recent body of work continues his decade-long exploration with fiber. His practice, a highly unique variation on weaving, uses mass-produced and commonly available materials such as acrylic and wool fiber, and velcro. Following a labor-intensive process developed by the artist, Larson embeds individual strands of fiber into velcro mounted on linen, which he then stretches over a panel. Through controlled use of line, he achieves precise patterns and striations of color and texture. Larson’s process defies categorization, transitioning between drawing, painting, sculpture, and weaving.

In Vice Versa, Larson navigates two compositional structures: linear geometry and organic form. Typical of Larson’s geometric approach, the artist establishes the border of the panel as a constraint to drive the overall composition. As the work progresses, variations of color and thickness mimic the vertical and horizontal architecture of weaving. Optically, these works appear to follow a traditional warp and weft structure, but are built on a single plane.

 Larson’s organically composed work is the result of a departure from his symmetry-based technique. Larson builds upon a curvilinear composition consisting of irregular swoops and turns. The change in direction of each strand allows the piece to transform. Depending on the angle at which it is viewed, contrasting highlights and shadows emerge. This transitory effect of light lends itself even further to the organic nature of the composition.

The exhibition’s organization places linear works across from their organic counterparts. Flat Structure, Double Fiction, and Soft Axis, all geometric in nature, hang opposite the large curvilinear piece, Signal. This comparison of form and design emphasizes the power of color and pattern. The gallery’s back room is devoted to smaller, framed work but continues to follow the juxtaposition of form and composition. Three linear works, Outline 1-3, mirror three organic configurations, Inward 1-3, of the same color and size, allowing the viewer to meditate on the subtle differences between groupings.

Matthew Larson received his BFA in painting in 2006 from the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design and has since exhibited internationally and extensively across the country, including at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. Larson lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Please join us on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8pm for the opening reception. The artist will be in

attendance. For press inquiries or information about works available, please email info@masseyklein.com.

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Sep
5
to Sep 24

Interlaced At Textile Arts Center

Interlaced Exhibition

Opening Reception: September 5, 6-9pm

Viewing Hours: Saturday - Thursday, 11 am - 6pm (Closed Fridays), and by appointment.

In honor of New York Textile Month, the Textile Arts Center is hosting a collection of exhibitions to highlight the richness of contemporary textiles. Reflecting a diversity of material and technique, "Interlaced" features site-specific installation as well as sculpture, collage, weaving, knitting and embroidery. 

Exhibitions Include:

“Evolution: Ursus americanus” featuring the work of Deborah Simon

“The Gloaming” featuring the work of Megan C. Mosholder

“The Quilted Object” featuring the work of Hannah Goff, Monica Hofstadter, Liz Robb and Pedro Silva

“Rapture of the Deep: The Textile Art of Tzuri Gueta” featuring work by Tzuri Gueta and curated by Ya’ara Keydar

For Inquiries: Tegan Roberts at tegan@textileartscenter.com

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins' exhibition, Conduition is an iteration of her dynamic visual language, one in which she explores new materials, hybridizes design with sculptural objects, and experiments with scale. Through Collins' use of texture, material, and vibrant color, she generates evocative flows, fields, and vibrations. Her formal and conceptual elements suggest how liquid  landscapes function as energy conduits across a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional works. Among the works on view is a twenty-foot long jacquard woven landscape based on ancient story scrolls, in which a continuous narrative is told across one expansive piece. In addition, Collins' exhibition includes a variety of sculptures made of glass and found objects, and textile paintings made from stretched woven fabrics.

Opening on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8 pm.
Gallery hours: Wednesday through Sunday from 11-6 pm

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Sep
7
to Sep 30

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

The Museum at FIT presents Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color (September 7, 2018–January 5, 2019), organized by the museum’s director and chief curator, Dr. Valerie Steele. Pink features approximately 80 ensembles from the 18th century to the present, with examples by designers and brands such as Elsa Schiaparelli, Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Alessandro Michele of Gucci, Jeremy Scott of Moschino, and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons. The exhibition will be accompanied by a book published by Thames & Hudson and a free symposium on October 19, 2018, that will be livestreamed.

Pink provokes exceptionally strong feelings of both attraction and repulsion. Indeed, it has been called the most divisive of colors. “Please, sisters, back away from the pink,” urged journalist Petula Dvorak in The Washington Post when she learned that tens of thousands of protesters were planning to wear pink pussy hats at the Women’s March of 2017. The issues facing women are “serious,” she added, and “cute” pink hats risked trivializing these issues. Yet attitudes towards pink are changing, and the color is increasingly regarded as cool and androgynous. 

 

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Comme des Garçons, ensemble, Fall 2016, “18th -Century Punk” Collection, Fall/Winter 2016, Japan, museum purchase.

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Sep
10
to Oct 4

Steam Stretch at Issey Miyake Tribeca

Steam Stretch at Issey Miyake Tribeca

 

Steam Stretch is a technique by which creases are woven into A Piece Of Cloth using heat reactive thread which shrinks when steam is applied to the garment. The two techniques combined to form the basis of Steam Stretch are: PLEATS, which was born in the late 1980s as a result of a constant quest for new material and technique development; and A-POC – an acronym for A Piece Of Cloth - is the approach developed in the late 1990s where garments are made by a single-form creation process. Clothes are first made into shapes and then pleated. Using this “stretchable thread,” both vertically and horizontally in the weave, it enables the fabric to be stretched or shrunk in any direction. By the simple application of steam to the cloth, the fabric that was at first flat, instantly transforms to take on a 3D form with countless surfaces, following the contours of the designed creases.

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Sep
13
to Dec 14

From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

  • Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College (map)
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 From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

Opening Reception September 13, 6-8pm

This exhibition, FROM THE DESERT TO THE CITY: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles,  places textiles from Late Antique Egypt in multiple contexts—their original use in the 3rd-7th centuries, their rediscovery in the early 20th century, and their reception in the present day—bringing these colorful remnants of the ancient past to life for today’s audiences.

Centering on the recent gift of 85 textile pieces from the Rose Choron Collection, the exhibition features other works from the Museum’s permanent collection together with loans from the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Opera Archives, and private collections. Works by contemporary artists Caroline Wells Chandler and Gail Rothschild bring the story of the textiles into the 21st century. 

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Sep
14
to Sep 21

SUPERNATURAE : Artisanal Anthropology

SUPERNATURAE : Artisanal Anthropology


specially sourced, hand-woven and hand-dyed artisanal textiles from India.

dear Dori,

thank you so much!


yes, please add this blurb -- (i couldn't see where to add it -?)



Supernaturae is the culmination of many years research into artisanal textiles. Born to suit a discerning traveler, they use exquisitely hand woven organic cottons and silks, including some special embellished pieces made in West Bengal for a wearable but beautiful loungewear line. All of the collection is made in small villages across India, from the fiber up and with a focus on historical textile practices. 


For NYTM we are offering a special preview of the Summer 19 collection. Open to the public by appointment - please email info@supernaturae.com  


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Sep
15
to Sep 30

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Conversations On Textiles At The School Of Design, Pratt Institute

This exhibition will highlight the vibrant and provocative conversations that the faculty and
students of the School of Design participate in while interrogating textiles. The field of
textiles is a wellspring of inspiration to both the fashion, product and interior design
program’s material explorations and theoretical thinking.

As they work outside of the academic structure of a traditional textile program, the
students and faculty at the School of Design bring energy, focus and a pragmatic naiveté
to the subject of textiles. The exhibition will illustrate this conversation through student
course work and selected professors’ theoretical and professional endeavors relating to
textiles.

Opening hours: 11AM-6PM

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Sep
17
to Sep 21

Talant! Showcasing The Finalists For The Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Talent! exhibit showcasing the finalists for the Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Mohawk proudly sponsors this prize to support emerging textile designers

Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort and fellow curator Philip Fimmano are pleased to announce the creation of a new international design prize to be awarded to a textile or fashion design student who exhibits innovative thinking and inspiring creativity in textiles.

The Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize honors Dorothy Waxman, the original driving force behind Trend Union and EDELKOORT INC. in the United States and contributing reporter to the magazines View on Colour, Textile View and Viewpoint. Waxman’s insatiable curiosity and discerning eye for the avant-garde has inspired Edelkoort and her team for decades. Waxman also introduced the American fashion industry to European textile partners with her work at the Fashion Group. As an avid textile aficionado, she believes that creative fabrics can change the design landscape in profound ways.

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Sep
18
to Oct 4

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Opening Reception, September 20th at 6:00 pm

The work of FIT students and faculty takes center stage in the Gallery FIT exhibition Crafting Change. Organized by the Textile/Surface Design Department in conjunction with New York Textile Month, the works featured in Crafting Change use long established techniques in a modern context to explore the shifting boundaries between art, design, and technology. The use of hand crafting techniques combined with digital processes, preserves tradition while pushing textiles into the future.  Projects bridging science and textiles have the potential to revolutionize the fashion and textile industries, leading us to a more sustainable world. These works are promising examples of how FIT is successfully encouraging interdisciplinary mergers between craft, technology, and sustainability to usher textile arts into the 21st century.

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Sep
18
5:00 PM17:00

Textile Tutorial Night at Purl Soho

Textile Tutorial Night at Purl Soho

Join Purl Soho for Textile Tutorial Night! In celebration of New York Textile Month, our instructors will be offering two hours of fun and informative hands-on tutorials and demonstrations in weaving, knitting, and crochet. Bring your questions and curiosity as we explore all things textile during this free get-together! Come by our shop at 459 Broome Street on September 18th from 5 to 7pm. All craft levels encouraged!

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Sep
19
11:00 AM11:00

HINSON: Burnishing the ON in icONic

HINSON: Burnishing the ON in icONic

HINSON: Burnishing the ON in icONic. When Donghia, Inc. acquired HINSON in 2014 it got a storied brand whose name and product brought wistful memories into the minds of some of the world’s top designers, along with a handful of quirky yet much-adored textiles. Though hearts were full, knowing that the brand would go on, sales weren’t quite reflecting the love. The question quickly become, “Where do we go from here?”

Join David Toback, Donghia’s Director of Textiles, and team HINSON for an informative talk and festive inside look at the process and product associated with restoring relevance to an iconic brand. Also, be among the very first to see HINSON’s latest collection, “Star Power.”

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Sep
19
7:00 PM19:00

Curating Tapestries at The Met

Curating Tapestries at The Met
Elizabeth Cleland, Associate Curator, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Elizabeth Cleland works as a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and is responsible for the museum’s world-class collection of tapestries. She organized 2014’s exhibition Grand Design: Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Renaissance Tapestry, and Relative Values: The Cost of Art in the Northern Renaissancecurrently on view at The Met; right now, she is preparing another big exhibition celebrating the art of The Tudors. At Harrison, she will recount some of the excitements and the challenges encountered in her job, including the nuts and bolts of putting together major loan exhibitions, writing catalogues, acquiring art works, and interacting with the public.

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Sep
20
to Sep 30

Liz Collins: Rays

Liz Collins: Rays

Launched in spring 2018, 1ST SITE is a project space located in MAD’s reception area, dedicated to works that interact with and interpret the interior architecture and ambiance of the entry. This fall, the space will house an installation by Liz Collins, an artist included in the Museum’s permanent collection. The installation is drawn from Collins’ “Rays” wallpaper series, the design of which she completed during her 2015 residency in the MAD Artist Studios Program.

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

  • 40 Ludlow Street New York, NY, 10002 United States (map)
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2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

Piecework Collective brings together artists from around the world, using unique aesthetics, processes, and materials to explore traditional patchwork and quilting. The Collective exists as a means to showcase work by contemporary artists - united by a love of the art form, a sense of community, and its connection to history - in order to communicate and strengthen the value of textiles and craftsmanship. The goal of the Collective is to inspire, educate, and foster community through art.

The 2018 Piecework Collective exhibition will feature new work from:  ace&jig, Abigail Booth of Forest + Found, Lindsay Degen of DEGEN, Season Evans, Coulter Fussell of YaloRUN Textiles, Lesley Gold, Ruby Hoppen, Lucia Lienhard-Giesigner of Bosna Quilt Werstatt, Lauren MacDonald of Working Cloth, Lorena Marañon,Kiva Motnyk of Thompson Street Studio, Kyle Parent of KTWP Quilts, and 

opening reception: Thursday, Sept 20th, 6-10pm

Meet the artists Sunday, September 23, 1pm-3pm

 

Friday, Sept 21, 11am-6pm

Saturday, Sept 22, 11am-6pm

Sunday, Sept 23, 11am-6pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

The Textile Arts Center is pleased to present Three Walls, the culminating exhibition of the 9th cycle of Artists in Residence.  

During the nine months residency, the eight artists worked alone, together. Their studios comprised only 3 walls; the lack of a fourth wall necessitated that their practices be shared and that their work inspired and conversed with each other.

Sculptural eyes seem to read hidden hand woven messages; a quilt designed to be worn meets a fiber depiction of a body, both crafted to protect; garments that research the dynamic relationship between maker/wearer and explore the complexities of function/value; and found images, layered and transformed, turn into paintings, while found materials are repurposed into sculptures.

The  artists in Three Walls come from a range of creative backgrounds, and the collective body of work featured reflects this variety of experience. However there’s a sense of unity. An empathetic identification. In concept, form, and process, they are companions.

Artists in Three Walls are Jamie Boyle, Rhonda Khalifeh, Junyu Li, Lily Moebes, Meghan O'Sullivan, Cory Siegler, Hannah Whelan and Chang Yuchen.

OPENING RECEPTION: September 20, 6-9pm
ARTIST TALK: September 23, 7pm

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Sep
20
12:00 PM12:00

TINY PRICKS: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump

TINY PRICKS: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump

Tiny Pricks is a project in which participants stitch quotes by Trump into antique or inherited textiles to create a material record of his presidency. Pieces are donated to a travelling collection to be exhibited around the country. The methodology of the project is based on social media sharing, participatory political protest, and craftivism. To view over 100 pieces created to date, please follow the series on Diana Weymar. Tiny Pricks counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, social media, and Trump’s overall approach to politics.

 

This is a special workshop co-hosted by Planthouse Gallery artist and activist Diana Weymar. Information on creation, documentation, and sharing of your Tiny Prick piece will be outlined at the workshop but here’s a brief introduction to the project. If you are unable to make the workshop, you can email diana@weymar.com for complete instructions and participate remotely.

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HOW TO PARTICIPATE :

 


1. Picking a quote. I generally use Trump’s recent Twitter feed as a guide but have occasionally, as many others have, quoted statements he’s made over the decades. If you have a creative source or other reference material, please let me know. As long as it has a context to the series, it will work. For example, I used a James Comey quote for a piece.
2. Picking a textile. I use inherited textiles from my grandparents, donated by friends and strangers, and iconic textiles relating to the content of the piece. Things to consider when picking your textile: How is it to stitch into? Will the text be easy to read? If not using a hoop - handheld - is it thick or stiff enough to use (see examples of handkerchiefs folding into smaller squares with stitching through all four layers)? Can a washable fabric marker be used on it? (Ink is blue.) Is it the right size for my quote? Can it fit the entire quote? How much “blank space” is there for stitching? Does the design of the textile resonate with the content of my quote? 3. Merging quote and textile. I generally used washable transfer markers (available at craft stores) but I have also used a pencil and, in rare cases with thick textile, a thin Sharpie. Map out your piece, trace the shape of your textile onto a piece of paper, practice spacing and style of your quote on the paper, and then outline final version with a sharpie, lay textile over it, trace the text onto the textile with a washable marker.

 


ONCE YOUR PIECE IS FINISHED:

 After your piece has been stitched, washable marker removed, ironed, and photographed, it’s ready to be published. As you can see from my Instagram account, all pieces are given a number in the series. From there, pieces can have titles, hashtags, quotes, explanations, links, historical documentation, personal statements, or, one of my favorite, lyrics from pop songs. This is your moment to further share the thoughts that didn’t come out in the thread. If you like. I can also provide documentation for your pieces. You’re also welcome to share your piece on social media if you’re on it and to invite others to join you in making pieces.


All original pieces are mailed to me - I provide my contact information in the complete instructions and become a permanent part of the collection. You are credited as the artist of your piece in all documents and exhibits with an Index.

 The ultimate goal is to have thousands of Tiny Pricks created from around the world as a global reaction to this presidency. Making something beautiful out of something unpleasant and, to be frank, that has set off for many a kind of unraveling of values and security. Certainly, this is a way of creating something out of confusion.

 Please email me with questions, comments, concerns ... this project is in its early stages and it grows and evolves as others join it. diana@weymar.com. I am always collecting textiles for the project so please let me know if you have some to donate.

 Thank you,

 Diana Weymar

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Sep
20
6:30 PM18:30

Lidewij Edelkoort & Christie Wright Discuss Moooi's Extinct Animal Collection

  • Moooi New York Showroom & Brand Store (map)
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Lidewij Edelkoort & Christie Wright Discuss Moooi's Extinct Animal Collection 

Come celebrate our launch of the Extinct Animal Fabric collection, during New York Textile Month!

Watch Lidewij Edelkoort, Trend Forecaster and Initiator & Editor of New York Textile Month and Christie Wright, Art Direction at Moooi, discuss textiles during a panel moderated by Metropolis Magazine’s editor-in-chief Avinash Rajagopal.

While you enjoy cocktails & hors d’oeuvres, discover how we push the boundaries withnew textile production processes, how we created a fabric collection inspired by theMuseum of Extinct Animals and how our sketches became reality!

RSVP

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Sep
21
11:00 AM11:00

Repair and Re-dye: Breathe new life into old textiles through sewing and dyeing

  • Parsons Making Center - 2nd floor (map)
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Repair and Re-dye: Breathe new life into old textiles through sewing and dyeing

Workshop description

Add new life to your old textiles through mending and dyeing. Bring your tattered and worn favorite garments and try mending techniques from traditional japanese sashiko, felting, or improvisational stitching. Indigo vats will be available for on site dipping. Learn about the economic benefits and the shift in consumer behavior from disposable fashion to one of personally embedded value. Through sharing knowledge, materials, we build a community of caring and move toward a sustainable future. All levels welcome, bring your garments and supplies, some additional material available in the workshop. Pre-registration is encouraged as this event has limited capacity.

Morning Session 11 am - 1 pm
Afternoon session 2 pm - 4 pm

Organizer description

Laura Sansone is a textile designer, activist, and consultant. She is the creator of Textile Lab, a design and consulting company that supports environmentally responsible textile methods, and regional systems of production. Laura is currently an Assistant Professor of Textiles at Parsons The New School For Design. She has developed initiatives that bring NY designers and farmers together with the goal of creating products that have social and environmental value. Textile Lab’s NYS Regional Textile Initiative is a collection of locally sourced and produced yarns and textiles that are intended to link apparel, product and interior designers to the regional network of farms and fiber processing mills; including spinning, weaving and knitting. This initiative is recognized internationally as a significant economic revitalization effort on the East Coast of the US. In addition, she has designed woven textiles for the following companies: Maharam, New York, NY, American Silk Mills, New York, NY and Burlington House Fabrics, New York, NY.

Donna Maione is a designer, artist, educator and sustainability consultant focused on system change and closed loop design. She continuously seeks to improve the creative and business process to adapt to the environment.
She was the founding designer of her own clothing line and had designed for national brands. Currently, she serves as a sustainable development consultant for Brick by Brick Partners, an NGO committed to improving lives in rural communities in Uganda, There, she advises on program development, training and implementation of strategy and policy. She teaches Sustainable Systems part-time at Parsons The New School For Design, and is a visual artist exploring environmental, ethical and practical issues in the textile industry.
Donna holds an MS in Organizational Change Management, and a Certificate in Sustainability Strategies from The New School. She studied at NYU and has a BA with a concentration in Organizational Behavior, and at the Fashion Institute of Technology with an AAS with a specialization in Knitwear Design.

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Sep
21
3:00 PM15:00

Open Studio: Suzanne Tick

Open Studio: Suzanne Tick

Suzanne Tick is the founder of Suzanne Tick Inc., specializing in materials brand strategy, product design, development, and direction for commercial interiors. Suzanne is currently partnering with Tarkett on Brand Strategy and Product Development, Creative Director for LUUM textiles, and Design Consultant for Tandus Centiva.

Tick Studio operates out of a townhouse in the East Village, where Suzanne works and lives. The building was the site of the Reuben Gallery in the late fifties and early sixties, where Anita Reuben invented art Happenings and where artists such as Jim Dine, Allan Kaprow, Robert Whitman, Claes Oldenburg, Red Grooms, and many more exhibited their work. This rich tradition of creativity and exploration carries on into the present day, where the newly renovated Tick Studio develops a range of products including glass, floorcovering, upholstery, drapery, and wallcovering. Suzanne also maintains a fine art hand weaving practice and creates woven sculptures from repurposed materials that are collected and exhibited worldwide.

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Sep
22
to Sep 24

Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by the A/D/O, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 22th to September 24th on view at A/D/O 29 Norman Ave. Brooklyn, NY.

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Sep
22
11:00 AM11:00

Design Kids: Fun With Textiles

  • Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (map)
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Design Kids: Fun With Textiles

Participants will explore pattern making with Wolf Gordon Design Studio. Attendees will create wallpaper pattern designs inspired by elements found in nature. Workshops are geared toward kids ages 5 through 12.

Session 1: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Session 2: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

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FAMILY PROGRAMS FAQ

CAN I BRING MY GROUP TO THE PROGRAM?

Design Kids programs are intended for families. We are unable to accommodate groups.

CAN I LEAVE MY CHILD?

Caretakers must remain with their child for the duration of the program.

WHAT IS MY ROLE AS THE CAREGIVER IN THIS PROGRAM?

We require that caregivers actively participate in our workshops. Cooper Hewitt educators lead and facilitate a fun, family-friendly design project. Caregivers are responsible for helping their child with their individual projects and are expected to manage any behavioral challenges that might be disruptive to the group. Caretakers must stay with their child for the duration of the program.

HOW DO I REGISTER FOR A PROGRAM?

All family programming is on a first-come, first-serve basis. You cannot reserve a ticket online. We recommend arriving to the event location fifteen minutes before scheduled programming begins to ensure a spot.  If the program is full when you arrive, we invite you to join a later session.

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Sep
22
11:00 AM11:00

Open Studio: Lori Weitzner

Lori Weitzner Design Studio Tour

Meet Lori Weitzner and view her inspirational Chelsea based "white box sanctuary", where you can learn about the creative process behind the eponymous Weitzner brand of textiles and wallcoverings.

In addition, get a first look at Lori's latest venture-a jewelry collection launching in November. Unique beaded and embroidered pieces rooted in age-old artisan techniques- made for the modern woman.

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Sep
22
1:00 PM13:00

A Joint Open Studio at Brooklyn Fire Proof Studios

Fragmentario – Ste 417

Before the mid-nineteenth century, plants and other natural sources were used across all cultures to color fiber. After the discovery of synthetic dyes, natural dyes were quickly replaced and an important part of civilization was forgotten. Fragmentario seeks to explore natural dyes in a modern context and inspire conversations about cultural heritage and collective memory. 

Fragmentario was founded in Brooklyn in 2016 by Maria Elena Pombo, a fashion design graduate from Parsons School of Design who has worked at Michael Kors and other New York based designers.

@Fragmentario_

 

Pouch NYC – Ste 317

Founded in 2017, Pouch is a New York-based furniture design studio in the business of reconceptualizing comfort. In collaboration with artisans in Chalate, El Salvador, the Pouch design collective consists of New York-based artisans and designers contributing their craft and creative perspectives to a common platform. The resulting product integrates timeless handwoven techniques from Central America with endless customization options for an elevated style of hammocks that challenges existing modern environments. Pouch extends the versatility of hammocks and hanging chairs, aiming to make the physical experience of leisure readily available within the parameters of contemporary living.

@ pouchnyc

 

Anthemia – Ste 305

Anthemia is created by farmer, herbalist, and artist Barrie Cohen. 

 Barrie grew up in New York City but always felt a deep connection to nature. In her early twenties, she began working on organic vegetable farms, first in New Zealand, and then across the U.S., from California to New York. Through years of farming and study, Barrie became increasingly well-versed in plants and their medicinal properties, eventually falling in love with the traditional practice of plant dyeing.

 Today, Barrie works out of her studio in Brooklyn but still frequents local farms where she collects flowers and dye plants. Through Anthemia , Barrie combines her artistry in dyeing with her training in tarot. The result is one-of-a-kind garments that reflect the magic possibilities of dressing with intention

@anthemia.co

 

Laine + Alliage NY – Ste 301

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Sep
22
2:00 PM14:00

Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident

  • Textile Arts Center - Manhattan Studio (map)
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Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident At Tac

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. In addition to her artistic practice, she is an advocate for accessible technology education, sharing tutorials for working with DIY electronics on urbanarmor.org. 

During her time at the WIP Residency, McDermott will be completing a large skirt covered in speakers, titled Urban Armor #8: The Public Speaker. Production research for this project has included the creation of numerous custom speaker experiments using materials such as conductive thread and magnets. The current iteration of the project uses low-cost, pre-fabricated speakers, individually soldered to mini-amplifiers, and sewn into the garment. The Public Speaker will ultimately be linked to a microphone, and will playback sounds it picks up as the wearer moves through the city, as a kind of mockingbird/surveillance machine. The Public Speaker is part of Urban Armor, a larger series of experimental wearable electronics which respond to environmental and urban data in unique and ridiculous ways, in an effort to bridge the gap between speculative, virtual and physical spaces.  

Kathleen holds a BFA in Sculpture from Cornell University, an MFA in Creative Media from City University of Hong Kong, and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Electronic Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is currently a Visiting Industry Assistant Professor of Integrated Digital Media (IDM) at NYU

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Sep
22
2:00 PM14:00

Open Studio: Thompson Street Studio experimental quilting workshop

Kiva Motnyk, founder of Thompson Street Studio, invites you to her Soho studio for a tour and short experimental quilting workshop. We will learn the hands on process of creating a small quilted textile using repurposed, or naturally dyed materials in free form way. Materials will be provided however Students are invited to bring meaningful textiles they would like to incorporate into the piece. 

Thompson Street Studio designs objects for the home with a focus on experimental textiles. We explore connections between art, industry and nature through a process of conception, collaboration and innovation. 

Our goal is to inspire community, building on traditional techniques to create heirlooms with modernist sensibility.

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Sep
23
1:00 PM13:00

Open Studio: Jeannine Han

New York Textile Month is pleased to announce an invitation to Jeannine Han’s Open Studio on September 23rd from 1pm - 4pm. She has participated in our annual open studios in the past and this year she will discuss her current work in hand weaving processes. There will be light refreshments served, all are welcome!

Jeannine Han, lives and works in NY

Jeannine Han is an artist and designer living and working in New York where you’ll
often find her in the studio exploring materiality through textiles, fashion and film. Her
works have also involved developing highly technical sound sensor textile materials
developed a way of creating new instrument interfaces, synthesizer sources, and
tones in music harmony. Currently Jeannine is teaching at several different academic
institutions in NYC; Parsons, FIT and Pratt Institute in various disciplines and
technologies. She focuses on opening a trans-disciplinary dialogue in fashion and
textile forms.
Jeannine holds a Masters in Fine Arts degree from the Swedish School of
Textiles and completed a post studies program at The Royal Institute of Art,
Stockholm in Fine Art, and holds a B.F.A degree in Design/ Media Arts from
University of California Los Angeles(UCLA). Her most recent works have
been exhibited at Entrée Gallery, Bergen, Norway, Sculpture Center, NY,
Bard Graduate Center of Material Studies, NY, ICA London (in collaboration
with Tamara Henderson), and Performa 13

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Sep
23
1:00 PM13:00

'Meet The Artist' Piecework Collective

  • 40 Ludlow Street New York, NY US (map)
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'Meet The Artist' Piecework Collective

Several participating artists will be at the gallery during these hours for an intimate gathering to discuss their work. It is a great opportunity to meet some of the artists and learn more about their process. This is a free event with no rsvp necessary. Attending artists include :
Abigail Booth of Forest + Found
Lindsay Degen of DEGEN
Coulter Fussell of YaloRUN Textiles
Lesley Gold
Ruby Hoppen
Kiva Motnyk of Thompson Street Studio
Kyle Parent of KTWP Quilts
Lindsay Stead

Piecework Collective brings together artists from around the world, using unique aesthetics, processes, and materials to explore traditional patchwork and quilting. The Collective exists as a means to showcase work by contemporary artists - united by a love of the art form, a sense of community, and its connection to history - in order to communicate and strengthen the value of textiles and craftsmanship. The goal of the Collective is to inspire, educate, and foster community through art.

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Sep
25
2:00 PM14:00

Conserving Tapestries at The Met

Conserving Tapestries at The Met
Kisook Suh, associate conservator, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Kisook Suh cares for tapestries in the Medieval Art and The Cloisters collections in the Department of Textile Conservation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met). She will discuss conservators’ role and the complexities of historic tapestry conservation. She will also present highlights of major medieval tapestry projects from the last four decades that reflect the changes and advancement of ethics and methodologies within the practice of textile conservation. 

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Sep
25
5:00 PM17:00

Knit Night at Purl Soho

Knit Night at Purl Soho

Join Purl Soho for Knit Night! Gather around our shop table with other local fiber lovers, and knit whatever's on your needles, chat about all things knitting, and get to know each other. Come to our shop at 459 Broome Street on September 25th from 5-7pm... It's a free get together and all knitting levels are welcome!

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Sep
25
6:30 PM18:30

Parsons Healthy Materials Lab welcomes Dutch Textile Artist Claudy Jongstra

  • The Auditorium at The New School (map)
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Parsons Healthy Materials Lab welcomes Dutch Textile Artist Claudy Jongstra

Parsons Healthy Materials Lab is excited to welcome Dutch Textile Artist, Claudy Jongstra, for a lecture at The New School. Claudy Jongstra's holistic practice is intertwined with the natural cycle of her native landscape.

Jongstra's artworks and architectural installations embody environmental advocacy, placing ancient materials and processes within the contemporary context of global ecological degradation. Her work parallels closely with the tenets that support the work of Parsons Healthier Materials Lab, which is dedicated to fostering knowledge and raising awareness about toxics in the products that surround us, advocating for a world in which human and environmental health is placed at the center of all design decisions.

Each hand-felted piece, composed of Drenthe Heath sheep wool and biodynamic botanical dye pigments, stimulates the local ecology and economy.

Lidewij Edelkoort, internationally recognized design forecaster, strategist and educator, she is Dean of Hybrid Design Studies at Parsons The New School for Design, and founder of MFA Textiles program at Parsons which is currently in its first year. Lidewji has also initiated a September celebration of textile culture - New York Textile Month.

Reception to follow.

RSVP

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Sep
25
6:30 PM18:30

Artist Talk + Workshop | Natalia Nakazawa: Unarchiving Woven Histories

Artist Talk + Workshop | Natalia Nakazawa: Unarchiving Woven Histories

American Folk Art Museum Self-Taught Genius Gallery

Natalia Nakazawa is a Queens-based artist working across multiple disciplines, including painting, textiles, and social practice. In conjunction with Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts, Natalia will present “Unarchiving Woven Histories,” an artist talk, exhibition walk-through, and collaborative quilt-making workshop that explore the stories embedded in everyday materials and things.

This three-part program begins with a presentation on Natalia’s practice, touching on Orhan Pamuk’s “Modest Manifesto for Museums.” Her current traveling tapestry project, Our Stories of Migration, reconsiders objects from the collections of major institutions as tangible and intimate textiles for individuals to engage with through personal mapping and hand sewing. In the gallery, Natalia and exhibition curator Sarah Margolis-Pineo will unpack a selection of works on view, examining what material, pattern, and motif can reveal about quilts and the women who stitched them. To wrap up the program, participants will be invited to create a quilt square using materials brought to the workshop for their history and personal significance. Completed quilt squares will be cataloged and digitized to create a zine that will be distributed to participants and entered into the American Folk Art Museum archive. Following the program, light refreshments will be served.

Free; registration recommended. Capacity is limited for the workshop component.

To be placed on the waitlist, send an email to: stggallery@folkartmuseum.org

Please Note: this program takes place on the second floor, which is accessed by stairs. For participants who require an elevator, please email to make arrangements in advance: stggallery@folkartmuseum.org

Natalia Nakazawa received her MFA in studio practice from California College of the Arts, a MSEd from Queens College, and a BFA in painting from the Rhode Island School of Design. Her work has been exhibited at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan (New York, NY), Wassaic Project (Wassaic, NY), Museum of Arts and Design (New York, NY), The Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, NY), The Noyes Museum of Art (Atlantic City, NJ), Old Stone House (Brooklyn, NY), Project for Empty Space (Newark, NJ), The Space for Public Art (New York, NY), Blackburn 20|20 Gallery (New York, NY), Casa de la Ciudad (Oaxaca, Mexico), Queens Museum of Art (Queens, NY), Topaz Arts Inc. (Queens, NY), and ISE Cultural Foundation (New York, NY).

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Sep
26
6:00 PM18:00

*Bobble* Club House

*Bobble* Club House

*Bobble* Club House is a Knitting Social Club where knitters and crocheters from all over the city come together to make something new, binge our favorite tv shows/movie, and build a supportive community. Escape the stresses of your daily life with a little yarn therapy. Tickets are $18. Tickets cover entry into the event, snacks, gift bags (full of new yarns, discount codes, patterns, and products), and entry into the raffle. 
Commonly Asked Questions:
Can Anyone Join?
If you know how to knit or crochet and you want to meet other people who are into the same things then you are welcome to come!
What You Need To Bring?
Your favorite knitting needles or crochet hook
Something to work on (could be a new project or that project that you’ve been working on for months but haven’t had the time to finish it)

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Sep
27
9:30 AM09:30

Experience Story Cloths

Experience Story Cloths

“The threads, the scraps of cloth, the wool, the lace, and the stitching are all manifestations of beauty, resistance, courage and the possibility to embroider the world with grace and light.” ~Marjorie Agosin 

Explore the concepts of resistance, courage, and beauty through this interactive presentation about the Storycloth Database, an online compilation of narrative textile collections.  We will discuss some of the historical, cultural, political and therapeutic aspects of creating stories in cloth. There will be an opportunity for hand sewing to illustrate some of the points of the presentation.  Lisa Raye Garlock is an artist, art therapist and full-time assistant professor at the George Washington University in Washington, DC. As a credentialed and licensed art therapist, she has worked with adults, adolescents and children in hospitals, schools, community-based organizations and shelters. She works with the international non-profit, Common Threads Project, co-training therapists in using story cloths to help survivors recover from the trauma of gender-based violence.

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Sep
27
to Sep 29

Continuation of Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

  • The Stone Barns Center (map)
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Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by The Stone Barns Center, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 27th to September 30th on view at The Stone Barns Center

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Sep
27
5:30 PM17:30

Feed Sacks: The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric

  • Parsons School of Design - Johnson/Kaplan - Auditorium - A 106 (map)
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Feed Sacks: The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric
A lecture by the Author Linzee Kull McCray  

In the United States in the 1940s, more than three million men, women, and children wore clothing made of feed sacks, the generic name for the cotton bags that once held everything from animal feed and agricultural seed to flour and sugar to hams, laxatives, and ballots. In an era where nothing went to waste, feed sacks were seen as “free fabric” and prized by women on farms and in town. 

It didn’t take long for manufacturers to realize the opportunities this created for industry and marketing. What were once plain sacks printed with a company logo evolved into bags stamped with cut-and-sew dolls and embroidery patterns. By the late 1930s it was possible to buy sacks printed with patterns that rivaled those found in the latest fashions—more than 18,000 different prints and colorways have been documented. Manufacturers joined forces with the cotton industry to keep sewists loyal to cotton sacks, sponsoring feed sack-sewing contests at county and state fairs, with prizes for national winners that included automobiles and trips to Hollywood. 

Author Linzee McCray’s lecture features historic photos, vintage advertising, and fabric patterns, as well as actual sacks and the clothing, quilts, and other items made from them. It will be of interest to lovers of fashion, textiles and design, historians, and those with an interest in sustainability.

Linzee Kull McCray is a writer with a focus on textile-, craft-, and art-related topics. She is the author of Feed Sacks: The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric (UPPERCASE, 2016) and of Art Quilts of the Midwest (University of Iowa Press, 2015).  She has spoken nationally and internationally on topics related to both books, and served as an independent curator for exhibitions at the National Quilt Museum, Iowa Quilt Museum, and Texas Quilt Museum. She continues to research feed sacks, and regularly writes profiles and features for several magazines and blogs. She grew up in California and now resides in Iowa.  

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Sep
27
6:00 PM18:00

A talk on Bizarre Silks and Ikat traditions

A talk on Bizarre Silks and Ikat traditions

Established by Yosi Barzilai in SoHo in 1989, Sarajo is a destination for those in search of exquisite antique textiles and ethnographica.  Culled from the four corners of the earth, the gallery showcases an assortment of over 1,500 one-of-a-kind items.  Over the course of nearly three decades, Sarajo has established itself as a treasured source for designers, collectors and museums.

Join Yosi Barzilai for a talk on Bizarre Silks and Ikat traditions in their Soho store 31 Howard Street on September 27.

Ikat textiles are made by applying a pattern onto a textile by resist dying the yarns before they are woven into the fabric.  A predetermined amount of yarns are tightly wrapped and then dyed in one color.  Then the binding is altered and the yarns are dyed again in a different color.  This process can be repeated several times to produce polychromatic patterns once the dyeing is finished and the yarns are woven into fabric.

Bizarre silks were popular in Italy, France, and England at the end of the 17th century through the beginning of the 18th century. Antique bizarre silk textiles are easily identifiable with their strange asymmetrical design, bold colors, and lavish use of gold and silk threads.  They are woven on a draw loom, with the motifs brocaded in supplementary weft or with floating pattern weft (lampas).

 

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Sep
27
6:15 PM18:15

Textile Design Workshop: Embroidery for Change

  • Fashion Institute of Technology (map)
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Textile Design Workshop: Embroidery for Change

In this workshop we will explore the tactile medium of embroidery as a way to address public as well as personal issues during this time of social discord.

Working with simple embroidery stitches, up-cycled fabric and thread, workshop participants will create their own personalized embroidered button to take home at the end of the night.

Join us, as we harness the power of craft in a communal setting to create change and healing. No experience necessary, beginners are welcome!

This is a free event. Space is limited. Registration is required

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Sep
27
7:30 PM19:30

Gabbeh, Poetic Protest

Gabbeh, Poetic Protest

Heirloom works to cultivate a deeper understanding and appreciation of handmade rugs. We strive to keep this ancient tradition relevant to this generation and the next. We supply rugs to everyone from the sets of feature films to boutique hotels to local New Yorkers.

Almost three decades ago, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, one of the most popular post-revolutionary Iranian directors, was approached by a local organization to make a documentary about the nomadic Qashqa'i tribe from southern Iran. With the intention to promote the sale of gabbeh rugs, more coarsely knotted, thick, village rugs, often depicting animals and humans in a more simple geometric design. 

While this project has the content of a staged documentary of the Qashqa'i tribe, Gabbeh is a visually enticing experience exploring the creation of a local carpet, and the weaver's and their community that literally weave their life stories into the rug. As with gabbeh carpets, color is a key visual element in this film, and at the time, a protest to the recently tightened dress code of black for all women. Makhmalbaf connects the illegality of colorful clothing with the suppression of nature and life. Taking after the poetic tradition of Rumi, Hafez and Attar, Gabbeh longs for the realm of imagination, of heightened colors and magical elusions of time and space.

Gabbeh is an epic tale of the forbidden passion that shapes the legend of a magical carpet. 
"Dazzling! The bold, almost psychedelically vivid images are woven together with a dreamlike density as pure as that of 'The Blood of a Poet' or 'Natural Born Killers'" - Entertainment Weekly, 1995.

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Sep
28
11:00 AM11:00

Marguerita Mergentime's Food for Thought

Marguerita Mergentime's Food for Thought

In the 1930s, Marguerita Mergentime, a native New Yorker, reimagined table linens as a modernist canvas. A pioneer of abstracted graphics, striking color and radical table settings, she sought to capture a nascent American spirit in her designs.

Being a good host was serious business to Mergentime, and so was starting a conversation. Her diverse interests converged in the seminal Food for Thought tablecloth that featured 98 American political slogans, each in the typeface of its period. Designs like Food for Thought were destined to trigger “inevitable arguments caused by eating of this cloth” and guaranteed that a meal would anything but boring. (Another example is her Americana wall hanging for the San Francisco Worlds Fair in 1939.)

Li Edelkoort invites you to join her and Mergentime’s granddaughter Virginia Bayer at a conversation-filled lunch around Food for Thought and more. The ticket price includes lunch and one actual Food for Thought tablecloth being reproduced for the first time since 1936 which you will be the first to receive later this fall.  

Details to be announced.

 

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Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa                                                                                                                                            Pink color.(noun, Spanish)

Terráqueo                                                                                                                                From planet Earth or related to it. (adjective, Spanish)

Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used, as the colors they yield will shift depending on the alkalinity and hardness of the water they are paired with.

Rosa Terráqueo is a textile exploration of water quality through the lens of botanical dyes. Avocado seeds and a variety of water samples, each with its own level of alkalinity and mineral content, were used to produce a spectrum of pink tones.

The project was inspired by the wide range of pink hues obtained in a series of avocado dye workshops conducted across Europe in the summer of 2017 by Fragmentario.

Upon returning to Brooklyn, experiments began  in order to reproduce the water of various locations using household materials, such as lime and salts to transform the soft, neutral water of New York into a variety of harder, basic and acidic waters. A network of collaborators also provided water samples from around the world– Colombia, France, Greece, India, Japan, Mexico, among others– which were used to map the range of avocado pink hues.

Both experiments were integral in understanding how different markers of water quality affected color. The results were used to infuse a range of hues onto the silk fabrics of the collection.

Rosa Terráqueo seeks to visually illustrate  the significance of water quality and to question how these variables affect our environments and ourselves. Its name is a nod to the global nature of the waters used for the project and the diverse pink hues obtained with  them.

 

Fragmentario

Before the mid-nineteenth century, plants and other natural sources were used across all cultures to color fiber. After the discovery of synthetic dyes, natural dyes were quickly replaced and an important part of civilization was forgotten. Fragmentario seeks to explore natural dyes in a modern context and inspire conversations about cultural heritage and collective memory. 

Fragmentario was founded in Brooklyn in 2016 by Maria Elena Pombo, a fashion design graduate from Parsons School of Design who has worked at Michael Kors and other New York based designers.

Rosa Terráqueo, an accompanying presentation, will be held at A/D/O on 8/28/18 to showcase the ranges of colors achieved with avocado seeds on textiles and clothing.

 RSVP contact info@fragmentario.co

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Sep
28
6:30 PM18:30

Self-Taught Genius Bar | Rosé Wines & Rose Quilts

Self-Taught Genius Bar | Rosé Wines & Rose Quilts

AT THE SELF-TAUGHT GENIUS GALLERY LONG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS

The American Folk Art Museum is extending rosé season into September this year with this special Self-Taught Genius Bar program, sponsored by Archer Roose Wines! Begin your evening with a crash course in Rosé 101. Learn about the varietals and processes behind the wine, and put your knowledge to the test with ample tasting pours.

You will discover that the beauty of rosé is that it pairs with everything—even quilts! The presentation will be followed by a short gallery talk on rose motifs in quilts that delves into the history and symbolism of the iconic bloom.

Please note that this program takes place on the second floor, which is accessed by stairs. For participants who require an elevator, please email stggallery@folkartmuseum.org to make arrangements in advance.

Named for Edith Wharton’s Newland Archer and Teddy Roosevelt, Archer Roose Wines is inspired by the boundary pushers, feather rufflers, and unconventional explorers. Co-founders Marian and Dave purposefully designed their wines to be as well-suited for fine dining as they are for unrefined adventuring. By becoming their own importers and using alternative packaging, Archer Roose is able to ship wine in bulk to the United States at a much lower cost, meaning luxury-at-a-discount-wines in planet-friendly formats. Since 2015, Marian and Dave haven’t lost the clear ambition and adventurous spirit on which Archer Roose was founded. They continue to scour the best wine regions in the world to find partners who produce varietals every bit as luxurious as they are respectful to the environment.

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Sep
28
7:00 PM19:00

NYS Regional Yarn Sourcebook Launch

NYS Regional Yarn Sourcebook Launch

Join Textile Lab at the Dennings Point Distillery for the launch of the NYS Regional Yarn Sourcebook. We will gather together to welcome new farms to the publication and celebrate the featured farmers, designers, brands, and projects that used the book this past year to inform regional sourcing. Local food and refreshments will be served.

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Sep
29
1:00 PM13:00

Pollution Hues: Exploring Water Quality Through Natural Dyes

Pollution Hues: Exploring Water Quality Through Natural Dyes

Once prevalent across all cultures, natural dyes were quickly replaced by synthetic dyes after their discovery in the nineteenth century. Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used.

High in tannins and readily available, avocado seeds are some of the most reliable colorants from nature. They yield a variety of (mostly pink) hues, depending on the quality of the water it is paired with.

During this workshop, participants will experiment with a variety of water samples from around the world to explore how different characteristics, like alkalinity and mineral content, affect the hues obtained from avocado seeds. Each participant will receive fabric samples to experiment with and a zine with information about natural dyes and water quality. They will also be able to save the fabric samples they will dye during the workshop with their respective notes.

Through this alternative way to explore water quality, participants will engage in different conversations regarding pollution and how seemingly innocuous substances can have harmful effects when present in high concentrations.

Pollution Hues, an accompanying workshop, will be held at A/D/O on 8/29/18 to experiment with color extraction using avocado seeds and a variety of water samples from around the world.

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Sep
29
3:00 PM15:00

DIY Light-up Badges and Signs with Kathleen McDermott

  • Textile Arts Center - Manhattan Studio (map)
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DIY Light-up Badges and Signs with Kathleen McDermott

DESCRIPTION

Make your own light-up sign or badge with September's Work In Progress resident Kathleen McDermott.

In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of circuit design using copper tape and paper to “write” a word or acronym of their choice in LED lights. Participants will also get an introduction to the software Eagle, and an overview of how to design circuits for professional printing, should they want to one day make multiples of their badge, sign or patch. There will also be an optional opportunity to learn to solder, which is useful for attaching LEDS to clothing and fabric.

Please note that workshop attendance will be first come first served, while supplies last.

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. You visit Kathleen's studio at Work In Progress from September 1-30, at TAC Manhattan, and learn more about her work and process. LEARN MORE HERE.

RSVP

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Sep
30
to Dec 16

Complicated Territory

Complicated Territory: Exhibition featuring Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle curated by Bridget Donlon

Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle create work that delves into the complicated territory of a specific kind of female identity, psychology, and navigation of life. Each artist takes on a contemporary approach to traditionally feminine subjects and forms — interiors, domesticity, self-reflection; florals, pastels, handicraft — to explore and critique this identity. Craft traditions are increasingly embraced by artists who adopt handmade forms, updating them with contemporary concepts and content. Artists Erin M. Riley and Martha Tuttle each take a different approah to fiber-based art and offer unique, fresh perspectives.

On view at Dorsky Gallery  

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Sep
30
3:00 PM15:00

CONDUITION: A Conversation Between Liz Collins, Elissa Auther and Li Edelkoort

CONDUITION: A Conversation Between Liz Collins, Elissa Auther and Li Edelkoort

LMAKGallery is pleased to present a conversation between Liz Collins, Elissa Auther and Li Edelkoort, as part of the exhibition Conduition and the New York Textile Month. In her work, , Collins incorporates a variety of textiles, vivid colors, dynamic patterns, and inventive shapes and structures, blurring the lines between art and fashion. Both Auther and Edelkoort are known for their ongoing expertise in this undefined area, focusing on the wide range of the use and understanding of textile and design. While Auther mainly focuses on the connection between art and design through her extensive writing and curatorial experience, Edelkoort’s main subject is fashion, using it to delve more deeply into the factors of the use, transformation and understanding of various materials. In this conversation, Collins, Auther and Edelkoort will come together to talk about Collins’ work in relation to the infinite identities of textile, and the relationship of Collins’ work to other artists, to the history of textile, and other ideas.

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Liz Collins, Blue Explosion (detail), 2018, Needlepoint with assorted yarns, 20 x 20 inches (unframed)

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Sep
30
to Oct 16

Run Home Collection for NYTM

The date for this event changed . The event will only open on October 5th

Susan Cianciolo and Kiva Motnyk have partnered on the 4th Run Home Collection opening September 26th in New York City at Bridget Donahue Gallery, annual traveling exhibitions and instillations that allow traditional ideas of art and design to be challenged. Run Home collection was created to explore process and collaboration, inviting artists and artisans to contribute in creating parts of the collection, as well as traveling for workshops, mentoring and building creative support. This refreshing approach to collaborative design reflects the ever-evolving spaces we live in, allowing change and growth to be effortlessly integrated into our lives. This years collaborators include professor and author of “Natural Color” Sasha Duerr, Furniture Designer Leon Ransmeier, Ceramic artist Jan Jasiu Krajewski, artist Johanna Tagda, Designer Jessica Ogden and Textile Artist Cara Marie Piazza.

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Photo by by Anna Falck

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Sep
17
6:30 PM18:30

Folk + Feminism Book Club | Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

Folk + Feminism Book Club | Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

AT THE SELF-TAUGHT GENIUS GALLERY LONG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS

Criminality and handcraft coexist as the predominant themes of Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace. The book is based on the true crime account of nineteenth-century author Susanna Moodie. Atwood constructs an imagined biography of infamous murderess Grace Marks (1828–c.1873), an Irish-born Canadian domestic servant, convicted in 1843 of murdering her employer, Thomas Kinnear, and his housekeeper, Nancy Montgomery. The novel unfolds through a series of conversations between Grace and fictional psychiatrist Dr. Simon Jordan. Sedately stitching away, Grace reveals fragments of her memories, piecing together details of her life story and alleged crime that come together like the blocks of a patchwork quilt.

In the spirit of the novel, this Folk + Feminism Book Club explores craft and crime, and memory and history, through a two-part talk inspired by the idea of the quilt as a metaphor. First, dilettante and cultural historian Sara Clugage will address the sociopolitical context of Atwood’s novel, delving into systems of gender, craft, and labor in the mid-nineteenth century. Following, New York Times bestselling novelist Kimberly McCreight will unpack the craft of psychological crime fiction, speaking to the ways that writers piece together narratives across time, merging memory and experience to bring new meaning to the present.

Please be assured that familiarity with Alias Grace is not required to attend this inaugural Folk + Feminism Book Talk. This program is organized in conjunction with Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts, an exhibition prompting visitors to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends.

Light refreshments will be served.

Please note that this program takes place on the second floor, which is accessed by stairs. For participants who require an elevator, please email stggallery@folkartmuseum.org to make arrangements in advance.

 

Sara Clugage is a dilettante. She lives and works in Brooklyn, where she is the editor-in-chief of Dilettante Army, an online publication for art and critical theory. In addition to weaving and writing, she acts as a director for the Craft Advanced Research Projects Agency (CARPA), is part of the Leadership Collective for the Wikipedia campaign Art+Feminism, and hosts a series of salon dinners themed on the artistic production models and culinary histories of diverse times and places. She holds an MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Kimberly McCreight  is the New York Times bestselling author of Reconstructing Amelia, optioned for film by HBO and Nicole Kidman’s Blossom Films; Where They Found Her; and The Outliers, a young adult trilogy. The Collide, the final book in The Outliers trilogy, was published this July. Ms. McCreight has been nominated for the Edgar, Anthony, and Alex Awards. She attended Vassar College and graduated cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and two daughters.

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Sep
16
12:00 PM12:00

Open Studio: Weaving Hand Workshop

Weaving Hand Workshop

Join us for Zero Waste weaving at Weaving Hand.

We will weave our waste on cricket looms, creating a custom fabric. Please bring your own waste to be woven. Any material that can be cut into strips will work- old clothing, plastic bags, towels, sheets, yarn scraps, string, etc.

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Sep
16
10:00 AM10:00

Sashiko Workshop at Purl Soho

ashiko Workshop at Purl Soho

Purl Soho is thrilled to host third-generation Sashiko artist Atsushi Futatsuya for a very special workshop! He will expose you to the rich tradition of beautiful Sashiko embroidery, teaching the ins and outs of this meditative art with hands-on instruction. This workshop includes all the materials you'll need to complete an indigo printed pattern (which you can later turn into a tote bag, a pillow, a wall hanging, or whatever you like!). A full day of wonderful learning from a wonderful teacher, plus a midday break to explore neighborhood lunch spots... Please join us!

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Sep
15
3:00 PM15:00

Textile Design Workshop — Explore Weaving Techniques

Textile Design Workshop  — Explore Weaving Techniques

Make your own textile with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio! Learn the traditional indigenous back strap weaving technique, and leave with your own sample weaving. All materials will be provided. Recommended for audiences 18 years and older. Registration is required. $30 General Admission; $20 Cooper Hewitt Member, Student, Educator; $10 Seniors.

This event is free. Registration is not required. (official page)

Celebrate NYC Textile Month with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center! Join us on Saturday, September 15 at Brooklyn’s Industry City, 220 36th Street, for design workshops. We invite all audiences to come gain exposure to design and the design process. No prior experience with design is needed to participate.

Register today.

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PJ GUBATINA POLICARPIO is a San Francisco-based artist, educator, curator, programmer, writer and community organizer. His multidisciplinary practice utilizes research, writing, collaboration, programming, publications, pedagogy and public engagement as both art and tool. PJ creates intersections for meaningful connections between communities and art, especially addressing a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural audience. His publication Textiles of the Philippines is in the collection of The Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

SUSAN BROWN is Associate Curator of Textiles at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, where she has organized numerous highly successful exhibitions with accompanying publications, including Fashioning Felt,  Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, David Adjaye Selects, and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile, and also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design.

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Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident

  • Textile Arts Center - Manhattan Studio (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident At Tac

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. In addition to her artistic practice, she is an advocate for accessible technology education, sharing tutorials for working with DIY electronics on urbanarmor.org. 

During her time at the WIP Residency, McDermott will be completing a large skirt covered in speakers, titled Urban Armor #8: The Public Speaker. Production research for this project has included the creation of numerous custom speaker experiments using materials such as conductive thread and magnets. The current iteration of the project uses low-cost, pre-fabricated speakers, individually soldered to mini-amplifiers, and sewn into the garment. The Public Speaker will ultimately be linked to a microphone, and will playback sounds it picks up as the wearer moves through the city, as a kind of mockingbird/surveillance machine. The Public Speaker is part of Urban Armor, a larger series of experimental wearable electronics which respond to environmental and urban data in unique and ridiculous ways, in an effort to bridge the gap between speculative, virtual and physical spaces.  

Kathleen holds a BFA in Sculpture from Cornell University, an MFA in Creative Media from City University of Hong Kong, and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Electronic Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is currently a Visiting Industry Assistant Professor of Integrated Digital Media (IDM) at NYU

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Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

NYTM Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

Intermediate/ Beginner Level Knitting- Intro to Color Work, Intro to Cables

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Sep
15
1:00 PM13:00

Open Studio: WE GATHER

WE GATHER Weaving Circle

Celebrate the magic of making textiles by hand and join us at WE GATHER’s Weaving Circle. Bring your own loom or come as you are and use one of ours. All skill levels are welcome, from complete beginner to total master. WE GATHER owner and textile artist Whitney Crutchfield will offer short tutorials on basic weaving skills, and we’ll have some of our favorite studio yarns on hand for textile experimentation. Stay all afternoon or just for a few minutes, and enjoy the company of others and the satisfaction of creating cloth. 

WE GATHER is a Brooklyn-based educational textile studio and brand of hand-dyed, handwoven textiles. Whether through thoughtfully and ethically-made products made right in the Brooklyn studio, at-home weaving and dyeing kits, or workshops and private events that put the skills directly in your hands, our goal is to bring the magic of textiles to all.    This event is free and open to the public, though limited spaces are available. Kindly RSVP to reserve a spot. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

The Lori Weitzner Design studio is hosting a one-day, pop-up exhibition of imaginative work created by Textile Design students from Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). The curated designs showcase undergraduate and graduate Textile Designers’ innovations, highlighting the marriage of artisanal processes and the latest technologies. Sustainability, international cultures and maker spaces are emphasized. Join alumni, faculty and students for this exclusive look into the Jefferson Textile Design Bachelor of Science and Master of Science programs.

12pm - 1pm

2pm-3pm

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Textile Design Workshop — Explore Color and Pattern

Textile Design Workshop — Explore Color and Pattern

Participants will play with color, pattern and other design elements to design textiles with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio and Cynthia Alberto, Founder and Director of Weaving Hand. This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages. Children must be over the age of 5 to participate.

This event is free. Registration is not required.

This event is free. Registration is not required. (official page)

Celebrate NYC Textile Month with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center! Join us on Saturday, September 15 at Brooklyn’s Industry City, 220 36th Street, for design workshops. We invite all audiences to come gain exposure to design and the design process. No prior experience with design is needed to participate.

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PJ GUBATINA POLICARPIO is a San Francisco-based artist, educator, curator, programmer, writer and community organizer. His multidisciplinary practice utilizes research, writing, collaboration, programming, publications, pedagogy and public engagement as both art and tool. PJ creates intersections for meaningful connections between communities and art, especially addressing a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural audience. His publication Textiles of the Philippines is in the collection of The Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

CYNTHIA  ALBERTO is Filipina, an artist, weaver, weaving activist,  teacher, and founder/director of the Brooklyn-based weaving studio, Weaving Hand.  Her personal work as a fiber artist bridges traditional and contemporary weaving: drawing inspiration from ancient communities of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Cynthia honors the artisanal process of weaving while using unconventional materials to create expressions of form, structure, and function, often addressing themes such as femininity, age, and beauty as it relates to our culture today. 

nspired by her studio practice and teaching, Cynthia continuously explores diverse relationships between weaving, healing, inclusive art, craft, and sustainability.  In 2014 at Weaving Hand, Cynthia developed "Weaving Together":  a series of ongoing collaborative weaving events that focus on healing the community and create interpersonal relationships through the act of weaving together. Members of different communities are invited to bring recycled materials to weave alongside their neighbors. "Weaving Together" events were held at Pioneer WorksQueens MuseumAce Hotel, and Bldg 92 Brooklyn Navy Yard

SUSAN BROWN is Associate Curator of Textiles at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, where she has organized numerous highly successful exhibitions with accompanying publications, including Fashioning Felt,  Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, David Adjaye Selects, and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile, and also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design.

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Cooper Hewitt Conversations

Cooper Hewitt Conversations

Join Cooper Hewitt curator Susan Brown in conversation with PJ Gubatina Policarpio to discover how the rich history of textiles informs current techniques and innovations. Geek out on the past, present, and future of textile design! This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages.

This event is free. Registration is not required. (official page)

Celebrate NYC Textile Month with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center! Join us on Saturday, September 15 at Brooklyn’s Industry City, 220 36th Street, for design workshops. We invite all audiences to come gain exposure to design and the design process. No prior experience with design is needed to participate.

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12:00 PM–2:00 PM: TEXTILE DESIGN WORKSHOP— EXPLORE COLOR AND PATTERN

Participants will play with color, pattern and other design elements to design textiles with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio and Cynthia Alberto, Founder and Director of  Weaving Hand. This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages. Children must be over the age of 5 to participate.

2:30–3:00 PM: COOPER HEWITT CONVERSATIONS

Join Cooper Hewitt curator Matilda McQuaid in conversation with PJ Gubatina Policarpio to discover how the rich history of textiles informs current techniques and innovations. Geek out on the past, present, and future of textile design! This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages.

3:00–4:00 PM: TEXTILE DESIGN WORKSHOP— EXPLORE WEAVING TECHNIQUES

Make your own textile with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio and  Cynthia Alberto, Founder and Director of Weaving Hand! Learn the traditional indigenous back strap weaving technique, and leave with your own sample weaving. All materials will be provided. Recommended for audiences 18 years and older. Registration is required. $30 General Admission; $20 Cooper Hewitt Member, Student, Educator; $10 Seniors.

PJ GUBATINA POLICARPIO is a San Francisco-based artist, educator, curator, programmer, writer and community organizer. His multidisciplinary practice utilizes research, writing, collaboration, programming, publications, pedagogy and public engagement as both art and tool. PJ creates intersections for meaningful connections between communities and art, especially addressing a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural audience. His publication Textiles of the Philippines is in the collection of The Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

SUSAN BROWN is Associate Curator of Textiles at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, where she has organized numerous highly successful exhibitions with accompanying publications, including Fashioning Felt,  Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, David Adjaye Selects, and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile, and also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design.

View Event →
Sep
15
11:00 AM11:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

image2.jpeg
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Sep
14
6:30 PM18:30

Panel Discussion | Queens Memory Program: Quilting Memories of Migration

  • Self-Taught Genius Gallery American Folk Art Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Queens Memory Program: Quilting Memories of Migration

Gather with a team of quilters and storytellers to celebrate the completion of Common Thread, a twelve-week series of workshops to create a community story quilt. Organized by local artist Naomi Kuo, Common Thread invited several local quilting instructors to teach participants quilting basics, and help them explore their own family traditions of craft and creativity. The result is a community project illuminating stories of migration—memories that are illustrated visually through the quilts themselves, and relayed aurally through embedded electronics that play recorded oral histories.

Join us to hear participants reflect on their experience contributing to Common Thread, and share your own memories of migration to Queens. Alisa Martin, vice president of educational operations at the Tenement Museum (New York), will be moderating this discussion. Following the panel discussion, take a look at the Self-Taught Genius Gallery’s current exhibition, Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts, and add your own Queens memory to the ongoing participatory embroidery project, Our Queens. Light refreshments will be served. Come celebrate with us!

Common Thread was the second “story quilt” workshop series developed by the Queens Memory Program as part of the Memories of Migration initiative, funded by a grant from Institute of Museum and Library Services. Memories of Migration was conceived by the Santa Ana Public Library (Santa Ana, CA) in partnership with Queens Library (Queens, NY), West Hartford Public Library, (West Hartford, CT), the State of New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, and New Mexico Highlands University (Las Vegas, NM). It is a three-year community memory project that gives voice to immigrant communities through the digitization and dissemination of oral histories that develop cultural heritage collections around the shared stories of migration in America.

Alisa Martin, vice president of educational operations at the Tenement Museum, is a senior arts and cultural administrator and project consultant with expertise working in organizations to align internal operations and product offerings with their strategic goals and branding efforts. Alisa led brand management and visitor services at the Brooklyn Museum, and has served as an adjunct faculty member at Baruch College and The New School. Alisa has led cross-functional teams through change management, process improvement, and audience research initiatives. Her consulting clients include the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Lincoln Center Education, BAM Local Development Corporation, and Columbia University. Before shifting her focus to the arts, Alisa spent the early years of her professional life in marketing, service quality, and human resources at MetLife and American Express. She is a graduate of Vassar College and New York University.

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Sep
14
9:30 AM09:30

Iconic Textiles

  • The Auditorium - Parsons School of Design (map)
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Iconic Textiles

Under Marimekko Umbrella.jpg

 

Textiles have the power to brand a collection, communicating a company’s heritage far beyond the talents of mere marketing. Traditional fabrics have traveled from region to region throughout history, recognisable because of their unique motifs, their authentic weaves, and their local colour. Today, luxury houses build empires on the strength of their textiles, allowing the fabrics to do all the talking, narrating stories and advertising craftsmanship just like a woven billboard. Prints, tweeds, stripes and pleats are just some of the mediums that brands claim as their own; putting textiles front and centre as a business strategy in itself.

As part of NYTM, the 2018 Talking Textiles Conference will host an array of international speakers revealing the secrets and techniques behind the seams of their garments and home textiles; fuelling trends and creating icons for the decades to come.

ICONIC TEXTILES

Eventbrite - ICONIC TEXTILES

TALKING TEXTILES CONFERENCE

Full-day Ticket: $150 per person

Students & Faculty: FREE! (with valid ID)

Textiles have the power to brand a collection, communicating a company’s heritage far beyond the talents of mere marketing. Traditional fabrics have traveled from region to region throughout history, recognizable because of their unique motifs, their authentic weaves, and their local colour. Today, luxury houses build empires on the strength of their textiles, allowing the fabrics to do all the talking, narrating stories and advertising craftsmanship just like a woven billboard. Prints, stripes and pleats are just some of the mediums that brands claim as their own; putting textiles front and center as a business strategy in itself.

As part of NYTM, the 2018 Talking Textiles Conference will host an array of international speakers revealing the secrets and techniques behind the seams of their garments and home textiles; fuelling trends and creating icons for the decades to come.

9:00
Doors Open


9:30
WELCOME TO NEW YORK TEXTILE MONTH 2018
Lidewij Edelkoort, Trend Forecaster, Trend Union & Dean of Hybrid Studies, Parsons


10:00
THE TEXTILE SKIN OF MOROSO
Mirko van den Winkel, Executive Vice President, Moroso USA


10:30

PLEATS, PRINTS & THE MAGIC OF FORTUNY
Mickey Riad, Creative Director, Fortuny Venezia


11:00
Touch Break


11:30
THE PRINTS THAT BRAND US
Peter Koepke, Owner & Director, Design Library, Hudson Valley and London

12:00

ICONS FROM SCANDINAVIA: the print vocabulary of Marimekko
Anna Hakkarainen, Marimekko North America


12:30
A BRAND MADE BY HAND
Natalie Chanin, Founder & Designer, Alabama Chanin


1:00
Lunch Break


2:00
MORE PLEATS PLEASE: the folded textiles of Issey Miyake
Philip Fimmano, Director, Edelkoort Inc.


2:30
HEAVENLY TEXTILES: Divine Inspiration at the Met
Mellissa Huber, Assistant Curator, The Costume Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art


3:00
PAPISM: an iconoclastic shade of crimson
Lidewij Edelkoort, Trend Forecaster, Trend Union & Dean of Hybrid Studies, Parsons


3:15
Touch Break


3:45
THE IMPACT OF THREAD
Bernie Leahy, Artist


4:00
THE POWER OF CLOTH: the printed work of Marguerita Mergentime
Virginia Bayer, Author & Granddaughter of Miss Mergentime


4:30
2018 Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize Finalists & Winner Announcement
Philip Fimmano & Dorothy Waxman; presented by Justin Hicks, Mohawk Group


4:45
approximate end
* programme subject to minor changes

Eventbrite - ICONIC TEXTILES

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Sep
13
7:00 PM19:00

Techno-Love Series At Fridman Gallery

Techno-Love Series Fridman Gallery, September 2018

For New York Textile Month, Weaving Hand  will participate by offering workshops for the duration of the month as well as hosting an interactive wearable dance performance towards the middle of September in lower Manhattan. The performance will be a celebratory experience that includes participants of other NYTM events, in addition to creating a fun and engaging atmosphere for everyone involved. During the course of the month, the company will be offering workshops and studio tours as well.

“Techno-Love Series 2018” 

fridman gallery will host a performative series of wearable woven cocoons, Techno-Love Series, an interactive audiovisual exhibit featured in the MAD Museum (madmuseum.org/events/ techno-love-series). They are inspired by the experiences of a recent revelatory experience enjoyed by artist Cynthia Alberto at a desert musical festival. The shape and style of the cocoons are meant to mirror the functions of Sensory Pressure Vests, which are weighted vests that are to be placed onto children or individuals who are overly stimulated to weigh them into place. They will be statically placed, but visitors can take them down and wear them on their bodies. The cocoons are built using traditional weaving methods, and utilize recycled rope from another project - MoMA’s 2016 “Weaving the Courtyard” exhibit. On the evening of September 13th, 2018 at 7PM, there will be a choreographed live performance of the pieces in a 20-minute show with electronic music, and a troupe of dancers.

Zakhele Zamisa is a New York-based music producer with a knack for hip-hop, electronic music, and their respective subgenres. He is curating the soundtrack that will serve as the backdrop to Cynthia Alberto’s interactive audiovisual exhibit Techno-Love Series.

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Sep
13
6:30 PM18:30

Kurdish Rugs: A Devotion to Color

Kurdish Rugs: A Devotion to Color

Heirloom works to cultivate a deeper understanding and appreciation of handmade rugs. We strive to keep this ancient tradition relevant to this generation and the next. We supply rugs to everyone from the sets of feature films to boutique hotels to local New Yorkers.

Please join Zach Zaman and the Heirloom team for an evening celebrating the exquisite craft of Kurdish weaving from Anatolia to Iran. During the evening, Heirloom will have their extensive collection of Kurdish rugs on display and will be offering some snacks and refreshments with a connection to the region. There will also be a short presentation.

While Kurdish peoples inhabit areas mainly from Eastern Anatolia in modern-day Turkey through to Northwestern Iran, they also have smaller numbers in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Syria. Perhaps due to a lack of national identity, labeling rugs as 'Kurdish' has been lacking in most literature until more recently. With their large geographic spread, they have a great variety of designs and structures, with the most freely designed nomadic rugs to the most minutely drawn and executed city-woven Senneh pieces. The coloring in Kurdish rugs often stands out, as they are renowned for their natural dyeing ability and are able to achieve the most spectacular jewel tones. From the most delicate and fine weave of Senneh pieces to the extraordinarily playful Anatolian village weaves, Kurdish rugs certainly stand out.

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Sep
13
9:30 AM09:30

Common Threads Project: narrative textiles and healing

Common Threads Project:  narrative textiles and healing

Discover the power of textile as a form of healing trauma, achieving advocacy, and offering a voice to victims of oppression. In many cultures and historical periods, story cloths have been an important vehicle for self-expression as women who have experienced unspeakable atrocities come together to sew their stories into representations in cloth. Rachel Cohen, PhD., clinical psychologist, founder and executive director of Common Threads Project, will present an audio visual talk about her path-breaking work with survivors of sexual violence in Democratic Republic of Congo, Bosnia, Nepal and Ecuador.  Dr. Cohen has developed an innovative approach for healing from the severe psychological consequences of war, sexual violence, and displacement that uses story cloths as a therapeutic tool. 

She will give an overview of the ubiquitous cultural practice of story-cloth making, and an introduction to Common Threads healing circles that take place around the world. 

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Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

Barbara MacCallum for TSGNY

  • The Community Church of New York (map)
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Barbara MacCallum for TSGNY

Textile Study Group of New York's monthly speaker's program. Guest speaker this month is Irish-born artist Barbara MacCallum who uses the scientific papers of her husband, Robert Johnson, an engineering professor at the University of Virginia, as well as casts of his body, to create beautiful, powerful, and provocative works of art. TSGNY members free. $15 fee for guests.

Artist Statement: In a society that places science above art in its educational systems, its financial rewards and its methods of recognition, I am reversing the relationship by appropriating the materials of science, obliterating their usual function and reconfiguring science into art. My work has evolved through a collaborative relationship with my husband who is a physicist; I cast his body and recycle his published papers giving a new existence to the detritus of science.

 

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Sep
11
5:00 PM17:00

Knit Night at Purl Soho

Knit Night at Purl Soho

Join Purl Soho for Knit Night! Gather around our shop table with other local fiber lovers, and knit whatever's on your needles, chat about all things knitting, and get to know each other. Come to our shop at 459 Broome Street on September 11th from 5-7pm... It's a free get together and all knitting levels are welcome!

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Sep
10
10:00 AM10:00

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Mid-Career Solo Exhibition
Drawing and Sculpture with Stitch

Through her art practice, internationally celebrated Dublin artist Bernie Leahy picks apart visceral human connections, finding and laying bare the vulnerability in each chosen subject  matter. In this exhibition, Leahy has created an evocative series of stitched drawings and small sculptures, embodied with a variety of media including gold leaf, uncut diamonds and acrylic on linen and canvas. Fragments of the human form—eyes, mouths, glances—capture Leahy’s personal moments and stories and imbues them with a sense of passion and energy.

Her work plays many emotional chords, there is a common thread of kindness and humanity behind all the piecesIrish Arts Review Magazine

Prolific and brave in her use of materials – Dr. Audrey Whitty, National Museum of Ireland

September  10 - December  14  
Gallery  hours  by  appointment    
Monday  –  Friday  |  10  AM  –  6  PM    
Please  call  212-757-3318
 

Artist  Talk  &  Reception  
Monday September  10  
5:30  PM
FREE
Reservations  Encouraged

AT IRISH ARTS CENTER

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Sep
9
10:00 AM10:00

Fellow Focus: Lexy Ho-Tai

Fellow Focus: Lexy Ho-Tai

In Kookerville, MAD’s Fall 2017 Van Lier Fellow Lexy Ho-Tai presents mixed-media artworks and soft sculptures crafted from found and recycled materials, exploring the intersection between craft and play. As part of the Museum’s Fellow Focus series, the exhibition considers art and accessibility in the context of Kookerville, an imagined world created by Ho-Tai, which will be activated by a culminating participatory performance.

In Kookerville, our inner children are manifested in brightly colored creatures called Kookers, constructed with detachable parts such as instruments and masks to encourage public participation. The creatures’ large scale, bright colors, and whimsical demeanor spark spontaneous moments of human connection and social disruption through play and absurdity.

Ho-Tai conceived the ongoing project in 2015, as a temporary escape—a world of healing through joy, color, and imagination—and a catalyst for unleashing viewers’ creativity and self-expression. She offers the alternative world as an opportunity for visitors to reevaluate their own world and imagine new possibilities, however unexpected or “kooky” they may be. 

On view in the sixth-floor Project Space, Kookerville is the fourth installation of the MAD Education Department’s Fellow Focus series. Dedicated to highlighting the work of alumni of the Van Lier Fellowship, part of MAD’s Artist Studios program, Fellow Focus invites these emerging artists to showcase the artwork they produced while in residence at the Museum. Funds for the Van Lier Fellowship are provided by the New York Community Trust Van Lier Fellowship Program, which supports talented, culturally diverse, economically challenged young people who are seriously dedicated to careers in the arts.

Lexy Ho-Tai is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily with found and recycled materials using traditional craft techniques. As a teaching artist, she emphasizes collaboration, engagement, and participatory projects as integral to her practice. Interested in the intersection between art making and social change, she explores themes of human connectivity and female empowerment as well as narratives of the inner child to produce work that is humorous, playful, and interactive. Ho-Tai earned a BFA in Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design and also studied textiles at Central Saint Martins, London.

Kookerville is organized by Cathleen Lewis, Vice President of Education and Programs, and Marissa Passi, Coordinator of Public Programs, for the MAD Education Department. 

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Sep
8
8:00 PM20:00

SHAWNA WU TEXTILE & GARMENT ARTIST - PRESENTED ANTIANTI VIDEOVIDEO W LIVE PERFORMANCE BY SLODOWN

  • 338 Moffat Street, Unif F, Brooklyn, NY 11237 US (map)
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Shawna Wu Textile & Garment Artist - Presented Antianti Videovideo W Live Performance By Slodown

As part of Design Agency ANTIANTI studio's VIDEOVIDEO Series, Shawna Wu is presenting a live fashion installation and artist video, featuring handcrafted textiles and natural dyeing with Asian ingredients. 

Shawna Wu (b. Singapore) is a New York based Taiwanese artist who works sensuously with garments and textiles. "A dressing is for a wound..." - Her work explores the ways in which materials address our understandings of (and gaps in) intimacy, empathy and cultural nuance. Much of her practice draws influence from her Eastern-Western cultural hybridity to find ways to learn and innovate from ancient, alternative sources of knowledge and culture. In a similar vein, she is interested in sustainable practices in fashion and textiles, and her works are labors of love elevated through handweaving and handknit craftsmanship, reiterating the idea of a deliberate, thoughtful material consciousness.

Soul RnB singer SLODOWN will also be cohosting with a live performance and dropping the debut of his latest music video! Stop by to learn and share with one another! See you there!

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Sep
8
2:00 PM14:00

Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott At Tac

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Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident At Tac

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. In addition to her artistic practice, she is an advocate for accessible technology education, sharing tutorials for working with DIY electronics on urbanarmor.org. 

During her time at the WIP Residency, McDermott will be completing a large skirt covered in speakers, titled Urban Armor #8: The Public Speaker. Production research for this project has included the creation of numerous custom speaker experiments using materials such as conductive thread and magnets. The current iteration of the project uses low-cost, pre-fabricated speakers, individually soldered to mini-amplifiers, and sewn into the garment. The Public Speaker will ultimately be linked to a microphone, and will playback sounds it picks up as the wearer moves through the city, as a kind of mockingbird/surveillance machine. The Public Speaker is part of Urban Armor, a larger series of experimental wearable electronics which respond to environmental and urban data in unique and ridiculous ways, in an effort to bridge the gap between speculative, virtual and physical spaces.  

Kathleen holds a BFA in Sculpture from Cornell University, an MFA in Creative Media from City University of Hong Kong, and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Electronic Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is currently a Visiting Industry Assistant Professor of Integrated Digital Media (IDM) at NYU

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Sep
1
to Sep 2

Thomas Bayrle: Playtime

Thomas Bayrle: Playtime

This solo exhibition—Bayrle’s first major New York museum survey—brings together works from the last fifty years, highlighting Bayrle’s experiments across media and their prescient commentary on the relationship between consumerism, technology, propaganda, and desire.

One of the most important artists to have emerged during the 1960s West German economic boom, Bayrle has received belated recognition for his influential works and processes. Long before the advent of current visual technologies, he foresaw our digital reality, employing photocopy machines and other midcentury tools in his early works to create analog visualizations of what are now fundamental traits of our digital culture. Bayrle’s thematic investigations have ranged from a visual analysis of mass culture and consumerism to reflections on the intersection of technology with global politics.

The exhibition highlights how the artist has expanded his serial patterns beyond traditional artworks into textiles, wallpaper, carpeting, and garments.

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iPhone Pietà, 2017 Silk, linen, cotton, and natural viscose Tapestry by Atelier Patrick Guillot, Aubusson 98 1/2 x 98 1/2 in (250 x 250 cm) Produced in cooperation with MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art, Vienna Courtesy the artist

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Sep
1
to Sep 9

Tony Vaccaro's iconic Marimekko photography from 1964

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Tony Vaccaro's iconic Marimekko photography from 1964

On show at Marimekko's NYC flagship store August 13th - September 9th 2018

Photographer Tony Vaccaro (born in 1922) has captured a broad range of our world during his almost 80-year career. He is best known for his photos taken in Europe in the 1940s. Later, he became a renowned fashion and lifestyle photographer. 

Tony Vaccaro has photographed kings and queens, presidents and popes, writers and actors, artists and scientists. In 1964, LIFE magazine sent him to Finland - to Marimekko.

This photoshoot gave us one of the most iconic sets of Marimekko photography, which today acts as an enchanting visit to the joyous and colourful 1960s, the origin of Marimekko. One of the models, Anja, was to become Tony Vaccaro's wife. What a story!

Please join at our flagship store to view in person.

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Sep
28
7:00 PM19:00

Lenore Tawney's Handmade Garments

Lenore Tawney's Handmade Garments

Friends of light and the Lenore Tawney Foundation invite you to join in the first ever public viewing of Lenore Tawney's handmade garments, and a conversation around clothing as an extension of one’s artistic practice facilitated by friends of light.  

Lenore Tawney (1907-2007) was a pioneering artist whose transcendent woven forms helped shape the course of American fiber art during the second half of the twentieth century. Less known are her garments, which she created for her own use from lengths of silk collected during her travels, and which reveal an artistic presence animated and extended through cloth.    

Friends of light develops and produces jackets woven to form for each client. They source materials from small-scale producers and construct their own looms to create pattern pieces that have complete woven edges (selvages) and do not need to be cut. The design emerges from the materials and from methods developed to weave two-dimensional cloth into three-dimensional form.

Please join us for this special event  

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Credit: Adam Reich, 2017

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Sep
28
6:30 PM18:30

Cornell Costume & Textile Collection Fashion Show & Auction

Take in the ambience of an elegant turn-of-the-century Prince George Ballroom while enjoying drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and festivities with alumni, friends and special guests. View designer garments in a dynamic fashion presentation, delve into fashion antiquity with CCTC Director and Assistant Professor Denise Green, and take home a piece of history during the evening’s silent auction. Proceeds from the auction go directly to the CCTC.  Learn more about the garments featured in the auction’s collection portfolio.

Event Details:
Date: Thursday, September 28, 2017

Cost: $125 Alumni & Friends, $95 Recent grads 2008-2017
Tickets Here I See who's Coming

Time: 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.     doors open I reception I silent auction opens
7:00 p.m.     fashion presentation begins
7:45 p.m.     intermission I silent auction open
8:05 p.m.     fashion show presentation continues
8:50 p.m.     silent auction closes and winning bids announced
9:00 p.m.     event concludes

Location: The Prince George Ballroom
15 East 27th Street (Between 5th and Madison Avenues), New York, NY 10016

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Sep
28
6:30 PM18:30

Julia Bryan-Wilson on Gender, Politics, and Textiles

Julia Bryan-Wilson on Gender, Politics, and Textiles

Art historian Julia Bryan-Wilson will present an illustrated overview of her recent publication Fray: Art and Textile Politics (University of Chicago Press, 2017). Discussing the works on view in the War and Pieced exhibition, as well as modern counterparts, Julia will explore the relationship between textiles, gender, and war. A book signing will follow the discussion.

Read more about the publication at the University of Chicago Press Books website.

$8 members, students, seniors; $10 non-members

Purchase your tickets here!

Julia Bryan-Wilson is professor of modern and contemporary art at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests include theories of artistic labor, feminist and queer theory, performance, craft histories, photography, video, visual culture of the nuclear age, and collaborative practices. She is the author of Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era (University of California Press, 2009), and editor of OCTOBER Files: Robert Morris (MIT Press, 2013). With Glenn Adamson, she co-wrote Art in the Making: Artists and Their Materials from the Studio to Crowdsourcing (Thames & Hudson, 2016). A scholar and a critic, Julia has written articles that have appeared in Art BulletinArt JournalArtforumBookforumCamera ObscuradifferencesFriezeGrey RoomOctoberParkett, the Journal of Modern Craft, and Oxford Art Journal, and many other venues. Her article “Invisible Products” received the 2013 Art Journal Award from the College Art Association. Julia has held fellowships from the Clark Art Institute, the Henry Moore Institute, the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, the Terra Foundation, the Mellon, and the Getty Research Institute. She was a recipient of a Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant, and has won several awards for her teaching. With Andrea Andersson, she curated the first major exhibition dedicated to the Chilean poet/artist Cecilia Vicuña

 

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Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

Open Studios with Studio Views Artists LJ Roberts and Sarah Zapata with Special Guests

Open Studios with Studio Views Artists LJ Roberts and Sarah Zapata with Special Guests

Join Studio Views artist-in-residence LJ Roberts and Sara Zapata for an evening of conversation with special guests the artist’s have invited to the Museum of a public studio-visit. Spending an hour with each artist, this program will offer insights into the work of both artists offered by experts in the fields of contemporary art, craft, and design.

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Sep
28
5:00 PM17:00

Maker Talk by MakersFinders

Maker Talk by MakersFinders

You are invited to attend a talk with three textile makers from the MakersFinders platform. Please RSVP if you would like to attend the talk (as seating is limited).

Talk 5PM to 6PM, Gathering and cocktails to follow afterwards until 7PM.

Mikaela Bradbury, founder of Arjuna AG, a 21st century luxury protective fashion company that uses silver-enhanced and sustainable materials to offer health and environmental benefits for urban living and travel.

Martyn Thompson, founder of Martyn Thompson Studio, A New York based multidisciplinary studio working across photography, textile and wallpaper design, editioned art and publishing.

Daniel Silverstein, founder of Zero Waste Daniel, the first line of zero waste clothing made from reroll, the fabric of the future. Zero Waste Daniel is composed of 100% scrap material.

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