Sep
13
to Dec 14

From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

  • Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College (map)
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 From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

Opening Reception September 13, 6-8pm

This exhibition, FROM THE DESERT TO THE CITY: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles,  places textiles from Late Antique Egypt in multiple contexts—their original use in the 3rd-7th centuries, their rediscovery in the early 20th century, and their reception in the present day—bringing these colorful remnants of the ancient past to life for today’s audiences.

Centering on the recent gift of 85 textile pieces from the Rose Choron Collection, the exhibition features other works from the Museum’s permanent collection together with loans from the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Opera Archives, and private collections. Works by contemporary artists Caroline Wells Chandler and Gail Rothschild bring the story of the textiles into the 21st century. 

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Sep
30
to Dec 16

Complicated Territory

Complicated Territory: Exhibition featuring Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle curated by Bridget Donlon

Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle create work that delves into the complicated territory of a specific kind of female identity, psychology, and navigation of life. Each artist takes on a contemporary approach to traditionally feminine subjects and forms — interiors, domesticity, self-reflection; florals, pastels, handicraft — to explore and critique this identity. Craft traditions are increasingly embraced by artists who adopt handmade forms, updating them with contemporary concepts and content. Artists Erin M. Riley and Martha Tuttle each take a different approah to fiber-based art and offer unique, fresh perspectives.

On view at Dorsky Gallery  

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Sep
30
to Oct 16

Run Home Collection for NYTM

The date for this event changed . The event will only open on October 5th

Susan Cianciolo and Kiva Motnyk have partnered on the 4th Run Home Collection opening September 26th in New York City at Bridget Donahue Gallery, annual traveling exhibitions and instillations that allow traditional ideas of art and design to be challenged. Run Home collection was created to explore process and collaboration, inviting artists and artisans to contribute in creating parts of the collection, as well as traveling for workshops, mentoring and building creative support. This refreshing approach to collaborative design reflects the ever-evolving spaces we live in, allowing change and growth to be effortlessly integrated into our lives. This years collaborators include professor and author of “Natural Color” Sasha Duerr, Furniture Designer Leon Ransmeier, Ceramic artist Jan Jasiu Krajewski, artist Johanna Tagda, Designer Jessica Ogden and Textile Artist Cara Marie Piazza.

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Photo by by Anna Falck

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Sep
30
3:00 PM15:00

Designer Talk for TEXTILETHINKING Exhibition

Designer Talk for TEXTILETHINKING Exhibition

Please join us Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 3:00pm for a Designer Talk lead by Pratt Institute School of Design’s Dean Anita Cooney. Dean Cooney will discuss with faculty members, Annie Coggan, Alex Goldberg, Jeannine Han and Deborah Schniederman how textiles inform and shape the Fashion and Interior Design Program’s curriculum and student work. The talk will be in the gallery at Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn and will celebrate the TEXTILETHINKING exhibition of textile work in the Pratt Institute School of Design as well as New York Textile Month.

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Sep
30
3:00 PM15:00

CONDUITION: A Conversation Between Liz Collins, Elissa Auther

CONDUITION: A Conversation Between Liz Collins, Elissa Auther and Li Edelkoort

LMAKgallery is thrilled to invite you to a conversation between Liz Collins and Elissa Auther (author and curator at MAD, Museum for Arts & Design) as part of the exhibition  Conduition and the New York Textile Month. In her work, Collins incorporates a variety of textiles, vivid colors, dynamic patterns, and inventive shapes and structures, blurring the lines between art and design.  Known for her ongoing expertise in this undefined area, Auther focuses on the wide range of the use and understanding of textile, art and design, connecting them through her extensive writing and curatorial practice. In this conversation Collins and Auther will talk about Collins' work in relation to the infinite identities of textile, and the relationship of her work to other artists, to the history of textile, and other ideas. (press release)

If you'd like to join us please send an email to RSVP@LMAKgallery.com  

Please note, initially the conversation was between Liz Collins, Elissa Auther and Lidewij Elderkoort. Unfortunately Edelkoort had to cancel her participation, due to unforeseen circumstances. 

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Liz Collins, Blue Explosion (detail), 2018, Needlepoint with assorted yarns, 20 x 20 inches (unframed)

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Sep
30
10:00 AM10:00

Victoria Manganiello, Artist Studios at the MAD

Victoria Manganiello, Artist Studios at the MAD

Exploring the intersections between materiality, space, philosophy, and storytelling, An artist-in-residence at the Museum of Arts and Design, Victoria Manganiello (@victoriamanganiello) makes installations, abstract paintings, and performances with hand-woven textiles, using hand-spun yarn and hand-mixed natural and synthetic dyes. Visit Victoria every Sunday at @MADMuseum’s Artist Studios. #MADArtistStudios 

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Sep
29
3:00 PM15:00

DIY Light-up Badges and Signs with Kathleen McDermott

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DIY Light-up Badges and Signs with Kathleen McDermott

DESCRIPTION

Make your own light-up sign or badge with September's Work In Progress resident Kathleen McDermott.

In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of circuit design using copper tape and paper to “write” a word or acronym of their choice in LED lights. Participants will also get an introduction to the software Eagle, and an overview of how to design circuits for professional printing, should they want to one day make multiples of their badge, sign or patch. There will also be an optional opportunity to learn to solder, which is useful for attaching LEDS to clothing and fabric.

Please note that workshop attendance will be first come first served, while supplies last.

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. You visit Kathleen's studio at Work In Progress from September 1-30, at TAC Manhattan, and learn more about her work and process. LEARN MORE HERE.

RSVP

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Sep
29
1:00 PM13:00

Pollution Hues: Exploring Water Quality Through Natural Dyes

Pollution Hues: Exploring Water Quality Through Natural Dyes

Once prevalent across all cultures, natural dyes were quickly replaced by synthetic dyes after their discovery in the nineteenth century. Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used.

High in tannins and readily available, avocado seeds are some of the most reliable colorants from nature. They yield a variety of (mostly pink) hues, depending on the quality of the water it is paired with.

During this workshop, participants will experiment with a variety of water samples from around the world to explore how different characteristics, like alkalinity and mineral content, affect the hues obtained from avocado seeds. Each participant will receive fabric samples to experiment with and a zine with information about natural dyes and water quality. They will also be able to save the fabric samples they will dye during the workshop with their respective notes.

Through this alternative way to explore water quality, participants will engage in different conversations regarding pollution and how seemingly innocuous substances can have harmful effects when present in high concentrations.

Pollution Hues, an accompanying workshop, will be held at A/D/O on 8/29/18 to experiment with color extraction using avocado seeds and a variety of water samples from around the world.

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Sep
29
12:00 PM12:00

Open Studio: Weaving Hand Workshop

Weaving Hand Workshop

Join us for Zero Waste weaving at Weaving Hand.

We will weave our waste on cricket looms, creating a custom fabric. Please bring your own waste to be woven. Any material that can be cut into strips will work- old clothing, plastic bags, towels, sheets, yarn scraps, string, etc.

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Sep
28
7:00 PM19:00

NYS Regional Yarn Sourcebook Launch

NYS Regional Yarn Sourcebook Launch

Join Textile Lab at the Dennings Point Distillery for the launch of the NYS Regional Yarn Sourcebook. We will gather together to welcome new farms to the publication and celebrate the featured farmers, designers, brands, and projects that used the book this past year to inform regional sourcing. Local food and refreshments will be served.

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Sep
28
6:30 PM18:30

Self-Taught Genius Bar | Rosé Wines & Rose Quilts

Self-Taught Genius Bar | Rosé Wines & Rose Quilts

AT THE SELF-TAUGHT GENIUS GALLERY LONG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS

The American Folk Art Museum is extending rosé season into September this year with this special Self-Taught Genius Bar program, sponsored by Archer Roose Wines! Begin your evening with a crash course in Rosé 101. Learn about the varietals and processes behind the wine, and put your knowledge to the test with ample tasting pours.

You will discover that the beauty of rosé is that it pairs with everything—even quilts! The presentation will be followed by a short gallery talk on rose motifs in quilts that delves into the history and symbolism of the iconic bloom.

Please note that this program takes place on the second floor, which is accessed by stairs. For participants who require an elevator, please email stggallery@folkartmuseum.org to make arrangements in advance.

Named for Edith Wharton’s Newland Archer and Teddy Roosevelt, Archer Roose Wines is inspired by the boundary pushers, feather rufflers, and unconventional explorers. Co-founders Marian and Dave purposefully designed their wines to be as well-suited for fine dining as they are for unrefined adventuring. By becoming their own importers and using alternative packaging, Archer Roose is able to ship wine in bulk to the United States at a much lower cost, meaning luxury-at-a-discount-wines in planet-friendly formats. Since 2015, Marian and Dave haven’t lost the clear ambition and adventurous spirit on which Archer Roose was founded. They continue to scour the best wine regions in the world to find partners who produce varietals every bit as luxurious as they are respectful to the environment.

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Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa                                                                                                                                            Pink color.(noun, Spanish)

Terráqueo                                                                                                                                From planet Earth or related to it. (adjective, Spanish)

Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used, as the colors they yield will shift depending on the alkalinity and hardness of the water they are paired with.

Rosa Terráqueo is a textile exploration of water quality through the lens of botanical dyes. Avocado seeds and a variety of water samples, each with its own level of alkalinity and mineral content, were used to produce a spectrum of pink tones.

The project was inspired by the wide range of pink hues obtained in a series of avocado dye workshops conducted across Europe in the summer of 2017 by Fragmentario.

Upon returning to Brooklyn, experiments began  in order to reproduce the water of various locations using household materials, such as lime and salts to transform the soft, neutral water of New York into a variety of harder, basic and acidic waters. A network of collaborators also provided water samples from around the world– Colombia, France, Greece, India, Japan, Mexico, among others– which were used to map the range of avocado pink hues.

Both experiments were integral in understanding how different markers of water quality affected color. The results were used to infuse a range of hues onto the silk fabrics of the collection.

Rosa Terráqueo seeks to visually illustrate  the significance of water quality and to question how these variables affect our environments and ourselves. Its name is a nod to the global nature of the waters used for the project and the diverse pink hues obtained with  them.

 

Fragmentario

Before the mid-nineteenth century, plants and other natural sources were used across all cultures to color fiber. After the discovery of synthetic dyes, natural dyes were quickly replaced and an important part of civilization was forgotten. Fragmentario seeks to explore natural dyes in a modern context and inspire conversations about cultural heritage and collective memory. 

Fragmentario was founded in Brooklyn in 2016 by Maria Elena Pombo, a fashion design graduate from Parsons School of Design who has worked at Michael Kors and other New York based designers.

Rosa Terráqueo, an accompanying presentation, will be held at A/D/O on 8/28/18 to showcase the ranges of colors achieved with avocado seeds on textiles and clothing.

 RSVP contact info@fragmentario.co

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Sep
28
11:00 AM11:00

Traditional Modern

  • Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator (map)
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Traditional Modern

In this day long, walk-in exhibition, we will be presenting the beautiful handwork from the valleys of Kashmir, the impeccable craftsmanship from the bylanes of Uttar Pradesh and the adornment cultures from the deserts of Gujarat. The folklore of the artisan women from these regions will be further unfolded in the videos and images capturing their clanking bangles and pleasant voices while they sing and precariously embroider the patterns on the cloth.

This display of colorful textiles from the Marasim textile craft library, will be representing that thing of beauty that is a joy forever- showcasing our innovations in the traditional techniques of weaving, felting, embroidering and printing from Gujarat, Jammu & Kashmir and Uttar Pradesh regions of India. Namely- Tangaliya and Patan Patola weaving from Gujarat, Daraz and Mukaish work from Lucknow, Gara and aari embroidery from Gujarat. Sojni and Namdah from Jammu & Kamshmir and many more. You are welcome to sit and watch the videos,  touch and feel the textiles, interact and ask questions. 

Established by Nidhi Garg Allen, a Parsons School of Design graduate and a technologist turned into a fashion Artisan Entrepreneur, Marasim is a NYC based company providing artisanal consultancy, sourcing and manufacturing services to the home, fashion, interior and accessory designers.

There are 10 MM skilled grassroots artisans around the world. Most of them are women. These highly skilled artisans are a part of the world’s biggest untapped and unorganized craft sector. 

Marasim organizes the craft sector- creating opportunities for the millions of artisans at the grassroots. And empowering the designers with the information on processes and cultures associated with various craft techniques and enabling them to collaborate and innovate with the artisans using the lingua franca of design.

This exhibition would not have been possible without the venue support from the very kind Brooklyn fashion and Design Accelerator team.

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Sep
28
10:00 AM10:00

Jesse Harrod MAD artist-in-residence

Jesse Harrod MAD artist-in-residence

Using rope to create sculptural installations, Museum of Arts and Design artist-in-residence, #JesseHarrod manipulates and transforms materials to animate their sexual and sensual qualities and explore the intersections between queer kinship, support, and sexuality. In her sculptural installations, she works with rope as a pliable element that she regards much like a drawing tool, specifically utilizing knot-making techniques such as macrame in ways that can be understood as simultaneously restraining and supporting. Visit Jesse Harrod every Friday at @MADMuseum’s Artist Studios.

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Sep
27
10:30 PM22:30

DESIGN BY HAND | FORM WORKSHOP WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

  • Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (map)
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DESIGN BY HAND | FORM WORKSHOP WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS


Through their masterful examination of elasticity of form in their Vegetables project, Scholten & Baijings will guide participants through a process of transforming complex forms into simple shapes.

Founded in 2000 by industrial designers Stefan Scholten and Carole Baijings, the studio is known for its minimalist aesthetic and rich explorations in graphics and color informed by investigations of hand craftsmanship. Works by the atelier have been highlighted in major museums around the world, including Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, the V&A, The Art Institute of Chicago, and Rijksmuseum.

ABOUT THE DESIGN BY HAND SERIES
Launched in partnership with Van Cleef & Arpels in fall 2013, the Design by Hand series focuses on the craftsmanship, innovations, and merits of contemporary global designers. Special programs connect university students, high school students, adults, and families with design.

Design by Hand is made possible by the support of Van Clef & Arpels.

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Sep
27
7:30 PM19:30

Gabbeh, Poetic Protest

Gabbeh, Poetic Protest

Heirloom works to cultivate a deeper understanding and appreciation of handmade rugs. We strive to keep this ancient tradition relevant to this generation and the next. We supply rugs to everyone from the sets of feature films to boutique hotels to local New Yorkers.

Almost three decades ago, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, one of the most popular post-revolutionary Iranian directors, was approached by a local organization to make a documentary about the nomadic Qashqa'i tribe from southern Iran. With the intention to promote the sale of gabbeh rugs, more coarsely knotted, thick, village rugs, often depicting animals and humans in a more simple geometric design. 

While this project has the content of a staged documentary of the Qashqa'i tribe, Gabbeh is a visually enticing experience exploring the creation of a local carpet, and the weaver's and their community that literally weave their life stories into the rug. As with gabbeh carpets, color is a key visual element in this film, and at the time, a protest to the recently tightened dress code of black for all women. Makhmalbaf connects the illegality of colorful clothing with the suppression of nature and life. Taking after the poetic tradition of Rumi, Hafez and Attar, Gabbeh longs for the realm of imagination, of heightened colors and magical elusions of time and space.

Gabbeh is an epic tale of the forbidden passion that shapes the legend of a magical carpet. 
"Dazzling! The bold, almost psychedelically vivid images are woven together with a dreamlike density as pure as that of 'The Blood of a Poet' or 'Natural Born Killers'" - Entertainment Weekly, 1995.

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Sep
27
7:00 PM19:00

FRINGE: Critical Insights into New Fashion Systems

FRINGE: Critical Insights into New Fashion Systems

Presented by Kordal Studio

In conversation with:

Arianne Engelberg, Creative Director of The New Denim Project

Jaadi Fonseca, BFA Fashion Design student at Parsons School of Design

Carmen Gama, Renew Designer at Eileen Fisher

Khira Goins-Paxton, Founder of Portion Magazine

Moderated by Brittany Dickinson, designer and educator

Please join us for a special evening celebrating circular fashion systems with a positive impact on our world. This invitation-only event, part of the Kordal Studio pop-up at the Wythe Hotel, will bring together designers, students, makers, systems thinkers, and other fashion activists who are seeking ways to shape their careers without compromising their ethics.

In fashion, and in society today, there are rarely prescribed linear pathways with clear end goals but rather an ever-shifting series of unexpected events which must be navigated in creative ways. In this spirit, we are bringing together a panel of four inspiring women who are each crafting innovative pathways at the fringes of the fashion industry. We hope this discussion will inspire both young creatives and industry professionals to challenge the status quo and reimagine their participation in the fashion system.

Tickets are $20 and include drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and opportunities for insightful conversations and new connections.


When:

Thursday September 27 2018

7:00-7:30pm: Check-in

7:30-9:00pm: Panel Discussion + Q&A

9:00-10:00pm: Reception



Where:

Wythe Hotel Screening Room & Bar

80 Wythe Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11249



Prior to the event, please visit our pop-up shop in the hotel lobby and get 20% off by presenting your ticket to this event!

Please check out our calendar of workshops leading up to the event: https://kordalstudio.com/blogs/journal/on-the-fringe-pop-up

Address: 80 Wythe Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11249 United States

 http://www.eventbrite.com/e/fringe-critical-insights-into-new-fashion-systems-presented-by-kordal-studio-wythe-hotel-tickets-50152977907



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Sep
27
6:15 PM18:15

Textile Design Workshop: Embroidery for Change

  • Fashion Institute of Technology (map)
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Textile Design Workshop: Embroidery for Change

In this workshop we will explore the tactile medium of embroidery as a way to address public as well as personal issues during this time of social discord.

Working with simple embroidery stitches, up-cycled fabric and thread, workshop participants will create their own personalized embroidered button to take home at the end of the night.

Join us, as we harness the power of craft in a communal setting to create change and healing. No experience necessary, beginners are welcome!

This is a free event. Space is limited. Registration is required

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Sep
27
6:00 PM18:00

A talk on Bizarre Silks and Ikat traditions

A talk on Bizarre Silks and Ikat traditions

Established by Yosi Barzilai in SoHo in 1989, Sarajo is a destination for those in search of exquisite antique textiles and ethnographica.  Culled from the four corners of the earth, the gallery showcases an assortment of over 1,500 one-of-a-kind items.  Over the course of nearly three decades, Sarajo has established itself as a treasured source for designers, collectors and museums.

Join Yosi Barzilai for a talk on Bizarre Silks and Ikat traditions in their Soho store 31 Howard Street on September 27.

Ikat textiles are made by applying a pattern onto a textile by resist dying the yarns before they are woven into the fabric.  A predetermined amount of yarns are tightly wrapped and then dyed in one color.  Then the binding is altered and the yarns are dyed again in a different color.  This process can be repeated several times to produce polychromatic patterns once the dyeing is finished and the yarns are woven into fabric.

Bizarre silks were popular in Italy, France, and England at the end of the 17th century through the beginning of the 18th century. Antique bizarre silk textiles are easily identifiable with their strange asymmetrical design, bold colors, and lavish use of gold and silk threads.  They are woven on a draw loom, with the motifs brocaded in supplementary weft or with floating pattern weft (lampas).

 

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Sep
27
5:30 PM17:30

Feed Sacks: The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric

  • Parsons School of Design - Johnson/Kaplan - Auditorium - A 106 (map)
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Feed Sacks: The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric
A lecture by the Author Linzee Kull McCray  

In the United States in the 1940s, more than three million men, women, and children wore clothing made of feed sacks, the generic name for the cotton bags that once held everything from animal feed and agricultural seed to flour and sugar to hams, laxatives, and ballots. In an era where nothing went to waste, feed sacks were seen as “free fabric” and prized by women on farms and in town. 

It didn’t take long for manufacturers to realize the opportunities this created for industry and marketing. What were once plain sacks printed with a company logo evolved into bags stamped with cut-and-sew dolls and embroidery patterns. By the late 1930s it was possible to buy sacks printed with patterns that rivaled those found in the latest fashions—more than 18,000 different prints and colorways have been documented. Manufacturers joined forces with the cotton industry to keep sewists loyal to cotton sacks, sponsoring feed sack-sewing contests at county and state fairs, with prizes for national winners that included automobiles and trips to Hollywood. 

Author Linzee McCray’s lecture features historic photos, vintage advertising, and fabric patterns, as well as actual sacks and the clothing, quilts, and other items made from them. It will be of interest to lovers of fashion, textiles and design, historians, and those with an interest in sustainability.

Linzee Kull McCray is a writer with a focus on textile-, craft-, and art-related topics. She is the author of Feed Sacks: The Colourful History of a Frugal Fabric (UPPERCASE, 2016) and of Art Quilts of the Midwest (University of Iowa Press, 2015).  She has spoken nationally and internationally on topics related to both books, and served as an independent curator for exhibitions at the National Quilt Museum, Iowa Quilt Museum, and Texas Quilt Museum. She continues to research feed sacks, and regularly writes profiles and features for several magazines and blogs. She grew up in California and now resides in Iowa.  

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Sep
27
2:00 PM14:00

DESIGN BY HAND | MATERIAL AND PROTOTYPE WORKSHOP WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

  • Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (map)
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DESIGN BY HAND | MATERIAL AND PROTOTYPE WORKSHOP WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

Inspired by Scholten & Baijings’ Paper Porcelain project, participants will create prototypes of everyday objects by taking cues from the materials makeup.

All materials will be provided. Participants are encouraged to bring their favorite cup or mug to reference during program.

Founded in 2000 by industrial designers Stefan Scholten and Carole Baijings, the studio is known for its minimalist aesthetic and rich explorations in graphics and color informed by investigations of hand craftsmanship. Works by the atelier have been highlighted in major museums around the world, including Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, the V&A, The Art Institute of Chicago, and Rijksmuseum.

ABOUT THE DESIGN BY HAND SERIES
Launched in partnership with Van Cleef & Arpels in fall 2013, the Design by Hand series focuses on the craftsmanship, innovations, and merits of contemporary global designers. Special programs connect university students, high school students, adults, and families with design.

Design by Hand is made possible by the support of Van Clef & Arpels.

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Sep
27
to Sep 29

Continuation of Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

  • The Stone Barns Center (map)
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Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by The Stone Barns Center, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 27th to September 30th on view at The Stone Barns Center

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Sep
27
9:30 AM09:30

Experience Story Cloths

Experience Story Cloths

“The threads, the scraps of cloth, the wool, the lace, and the stitching are all manifestations of beauty, resistance, courage and the possibility to embroider the world with grace and light.” ~Marjorie Agosin 

Explore the concepts of resistance, courage, and beauty through this interactive presentation about the Storycloth Database, an online compilation of narrative textile collections.  We will discuss some of the historical, cultural, political and therapeutic aspects of creating stories in cloth. There will be an opportunity for hand sewing to illustrate some of the points of the presentation.  Lisa Raye Garlock is an artist, art therapist and full-time assistant professor at the George Washington University in Washington, DC. As a credentialed and licensed art therapist, she has worked with adults, adolescents and children in hospitals, schools, community-based organizations and shelters. She works with the international non-profit, Common Threads Project, co-training therapists in using story cloths to help survivors recover from the trauma of gender-based violence.

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Sep
26
6:00 PM18:00

*Bobble* Club House

*Bobble* Club House

*Bobble* Club House is a Knitting Social Club where knitters and crocheters from all over the city come together to make something new, binge our favorite tv shows/movie, and build a supportive community. Escape the stresses of your daily life with a little yarn therapy. Tickets are $18. Tickets cover entry into the event, snacks, gift bags (full of new yarns, discount codes, patterns, and products), and entry into the raffle. 
Commonly Asked Questions:
Can Anyone Join?
If you know how to knit or crochet and you want to meet other people who are into the same things then you are welcome to come!
What You Need To Bring?
Your favorite knitting needles or crochet hook
Something to work on (could be a new project or that project that you’ve been working on for months but haven’t had the time to finish it)

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Sep
26
2:00 PM14:00

DESIGN BY HAND | COLOR WORKSHOP WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

  • Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (map)
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DESIGN BY HAND | COLOR WORKSHOP WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

Scholten & Baijings will share the studio’s investigations into the dynamic interaction of color through their Maharam Darning Sampler project. Participants will use various materials to explore how layering, opacity, and proximity can transform relationships between colors.

Founded in 2000 by industrial designers Stefan Scholten and Carole Baijings, the studio is known for its minimalist aesthetic and rich explorations in graphics and color informed by investigations of hand craftsmanship. Works by the atelier have been highlighted in major museums around the world, including Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, the V&A, The Art Institute of Chicago, and Rijksmuseum.

ABOUT THE DESIGN BY HAND SERIES
Launched in partnership with Van Cleef & Arpels in fall 2013, the Design by Hand series focuses on the craftsmanship, innovations, and merits of contemporary global designers. Special programs connect university students, high school students, adults, and families with design

Design by Hand is made possible by the support of Van Clef & Arpels.


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Sep
26
10:00 AM10:00

Lily Moebes MAD artist-in-residence

Lily Moebes MAD artist-in-residence

Lily Moebes’s (@lolmoebes) is an artist-in-residence at the Museum of Arts and Design. Her practice includes textile arts, printmaking, and sculpture which she uses to study how dissociation affects agency in the traumatized body and explores the politics of details and their erasure, with a focus on the body, the family, and the public sphere. Visit Lily every Wednesday at @MADMuseum’s Artist Studios. #MADArtistStudios 

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Sep
25
7:00 PM19:00

DESIGN BY HAND | DESIGN TALK WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

  • Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

DESIGN BY HAND | DESIGN TALK WITH SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS

Carole Baijings, of the Amsterdam-based design studio Scholten & Baijings, will be the featured speaker for Cooper Hewitt’s 2018 Design by Hand series. Founded in 2000 by industrial designers Stefan Scholten and Carole Baijings, the studio is known for its minimalist aesthetic and rich explorations in graphics and color informed by investigations of hand craftsmanship. Baijings will discuss the uses of color, form, and material in the studio’s work; the guiding ethos and philosophy of the design process, and the nuances of art and design in practice. Scholten & Baijings designs have been highlighted in major museums around the world, including Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, the V&A, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the TextielMuseum and the Rijksmuseum in the Netherlands.

Lecture, followed by "Scholten & Baijings: Lessons From the Studio" Exhibition Viewing.


ABOUT THE DESIGN BY HAND SERIES
Launched in partnership with Van Cleef & Arpels in fall 2013, the Design by Hand series focuses on the craftsmanship, innovations, and merits of contemporary global designers. Special programs connect university students, high school students, adults, and families with design.

Design by Hand is made possible by the support of Van Clef & Arpels

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Sep
25
6:30 PM18:30

Artist Talk + Workshop | Natalia Nakazawa: Unarchiving Woven Histories

Artist Talk + Workshop | Natalia Nakazawa: Unarchiving Woven Histories

American Folk Art Museum Self-Taught Genius Gallery

Natalia Nakazawa is a Queens-based artist working across multiple disciplines, including painting, textiles, and social practice. In conjunction with Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts, Natalia will present “Unarchiving Woven Histories,” an artist talk, exhibition walk-through, and collaborative quilt-making workshop that explore the stories embedded in everyday materials and things.

This three-part program begins with a presentation on Natalia’s practice, touching on Orhan Pamuk’s “Modest Manifesto for Museums.” Her current traveling tapestry project, Our Stories of Migration, reconsiders objects from the collections of major institutions as tangible and intimate textiles for individuals to engage with through personal mapping and hand sewing. In the gallery, Natalia and exhibition curator Sarah Margolis-Pineo will unpack a selection of works on view, examining what material, pattern, and motif can reveal about quilts and the women who stitched them. To wrap up the program, participants will be invited to create a quilt square using materials brought to the workshop for their history and personal significance. Completed quilt squares will be cataloged and digitized to create a zine that will be distributed to participants and entered into the American Folk Art Museum archive. Following the program, light refreshments will be served.

Free; registration recommended. Capacity is limited for the workshop component.

To be placed on the waitlist, send an email to: stggallery@folkartmuseum.org

Please Note: this program takes place on the second floor, which is accessed by stairs. For participants who require an elevator, please email to make arrangements in advance: stggallery@folkartmuseum.org

Natalia Nakazawa received her MFA in studio practice from California College of the Arts, a MSEd from Queens College, and a BFA in painting from the Rhode Island School of Design. Her work has been exhibited at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan (New York, NY), Wassaic Project (Wassaic, NY), Museum of Arts and Design (New York, NY), The Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, NY), The Noyes Museum of Art (Atlantic City, NJ), Old Stone House (Brooklyn, NY), Project for Empty Space (Newark, NJ), The Space for Public Art (New York, NY), Blackburn 20|20 Gallery (New York, NY), Casa de la Ciudad (Oaxaca, Mexico), Queens Museum of Art (Queens, NY), Topaz Arts Inc. (Queens, NY), and ISE Cultural Foundation (New York, NY).

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Sep
25
6:30 PM18:30

Parsons Healthy Materials Lab welcomes Dutch Textile Artist Claudy Jongstra

  • The Auditorium at The New School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Parsons Healthy Materials Lab welcomes Dutch Textile Artist Claudy Jongstra

Parsons Healthy Materials Lab is excited to welcome Dutch Textile Artist, Claudy Jongstra, for a lecture at The New School. Claudy Jongstra's holistic practice is intertwined with the natural cycle of her native landscape.

Jongstra's artworks and architectural installations embody environmental advocacy, placing ancient materials and processes within the contemporary context of global ecological degradation. Her work parallels closely with the tenets that support the work of Parsons Healthier Materials Lab, which is dedicated to fostering knowledge and raising awareness about toxics in the products that surround us, advocating for a world in which human and environmental health is placed at the center of all design decisions.

Each hand-felted piece, composed of Drenthe Heath sheep wool and biodynamic botanical dye pigments, stimulates the local ecology and economy.

Lidewij Edelkoort, internationally recognized design forecaster, strategist and educator, she is Dean of Hybrid Design Studies at Parsons The New School for Design, and founder of MFA Textiles program at Parsons which is currently in its first year. Lidewji has also initiated a September celebration of textile culture - New York Textile Month.

Reception to follow.

RSVP

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Sep
25
5:00 PM17:00

Knit Night at Purl Soho

Knit Night at Purl Soho

Join Purl Soho for Knit Night! Gather around our shop table with other local fiber lovers, and knit whatever's on your needles, chat about all things knitting, and get to know each other. Come to our shop at 459 Broome Street on September 25th from 5-7pm... It's a free get together and all knitting levels are welcome!

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Sep
25
2:00 PM14:00

Conserving Tapestries at The Met

Conserving Tapestries at The Met
Kisook Suh, associate conservator, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Kisook Suh cares for tapestries in the Medieval Art and The Cloisters collections in the Department of Textile Conservation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met). She will discuss conservators’ role and the complexities of historic tapestry conservation. She will also present highlights of major medieval tapestry projects from the last four decades that reflect the changes and advancement of ethics and methodologies within the practice of textile conservation. 

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Sep
24
12:00 PM12:00

“Pixels, Carpets, Knots, and Knowledge” An artist’s talk by Faig Ahmed

“Pixels, Carpets, Knots, and Knowledge” An artist’s talk by Faig Ahmed

In conversation with faculty from The New School

Lidewij Edelkoort, fashion & design trend forecaster; Dean of Hybrid Studies, Parsons/The New School; Founder, New York Textile Month  
Pamela Liou, Creative Technologist; Eyebeam Resident; and Lecturer, The New School
Seph Rodney, art critic, Hyperallergic; Lecturer, The New School
Marisa Jahn, artist, Assistant Prof, The New School

A conceptual artist from Baku, Azerbaijan, Faig Ahmed has been recognized for integrating memes from digital culture and the visual language of carpets to reimagine contemporary sculpture and question ways of knowing. Ahmed represented Azerbaijan at the Venice Biennial in 2013 and 2007, exhibited work in New York, Paris, London, Berlin, Moscow, Mumbai, Rome, Sydney and Dubai. In 2013, he was nominated for the Jameel Prize 3 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. His works are in public collections including Los Angeles County Museum of Art, RISD Museum of Art, Art Institute of Chicago; Chrysler Museum of Art, VA, Art The National Gallery of Victoria, Australia; Arsenal art contemporain Montréal, Canada; as well as various private collections.

Coherence. Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of the Artist and Sapar Contemporary_Small.jpg



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