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TINY PRICKS: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump

  • Planthouse Gallery 55 W 28th St New York, NY 10001 US (map)

TINY PRICKS: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump

Tiny Pricks is a project in which participants stitch quotes by Trump into antique or inherited textiles to create a material record of his presidency. Pieces are donated to a travelling collection to be exhibited around the country. The methodology of the project is based on social media sharing, participatory political protest, and craftivism. To view over 100 pieces created to date, please follow the series on Diana Weymar. Tiny Pricks counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, social media, and Trump’s overall approach to politics.

 

This is a special workshop co-hosted by Planthouse Gallery artist and activist Diana Weymar. Information on creation, documentation, and sharing of your Tiny Prick piece will be outlined at the workshop but here’s a brief introduction to the project. If you are unable to make the workshop, you can email diana@weymar.com for complete instructions and participate remotely.

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HOW TO PARTICIPATE :

 


1. Picking a quote. I generally use Trump’s recent Twitter feed as a guide but have occasionally, as many others have, quoted statements he’s made over the decades. If you have a creative source or other reference material, please let me know. As long as it has a context to the series, it will work. For example, I used a James Comey quote for a piece.
2. Picking a textile. I use inherited textiles from my grandparents, donated by friends and strangers, and iconic textiles relating to the content of the piece. Things to consider when picking your textile: How is it to stitch into? Will the text be easy to read? If not using a hoop - handheld - is it thick or stiff enough to use (see examples of handkerchiefs folding into smaller squares with stitching through all four layers)? Can a washable fabric marker be used on it? (Ink is blue.) Is it the right size for my quote? Can it fit the entire quote? How much “blank space” is there for stitching? Does the design of the textile resonate with the content of my quote? 3. Merging quote and textile. I generally used washable transfer markers (available at craft stores) but I have also used a pencil and, in rare cases with thick textile, a thin Sharpie. Map out your piece, trace the shape of your textile onto a piece of paper, practice spacing and style of your quote on the paper, and then outline final version with a sharpie, lay textile over it, trace the text onto the textile with a washable marker.

 


ONCE YOUR PIECE IS FINISHED:

 After your piece has been stitched, washable marker removed, ironed, and photographed, it’s ready to be published. As you can see from my Instagram account, all pieces are given a number in the series. From there, pieces can have titles, hashtags, quotes, explanations, links, historical documentation, personal statements, or, one of my favorite, lyrics from pop songs. This is your moment to further share the thoughts that didn’t come out in the thread. If you like. I can also provide documentation for your pieces. You’re also welcome to share your piece on social media if you’re on it and to invite others to join you in making pieces.


All original pieces are mailed to me - I provide my contact information in the complete instructions and become a permanent part of the collection. You are credited as the artist of your piece in all documents and exhibits with an Index.

 The ultimate goal is to have thousands of Tiny Pricks created from around the world as a global reaction to this presidency. Making something beautiful out of something unpleasant and, to be frank, that has set off for many a kind of unraveling of values and security. Certainly, this is a way of creating something out of confusion.

 Please email me with questions, comments, concerns ... this project is in its early stages and it grows and evolves as others join it. diana@weymar.com. I am always collecting textiles for the project so please let me know if you have some to donate.

 Thank you,

 Diana Weymar