exhibitions

Filtering by: exhibitions

Sep
30
to Oct 16

Run Home Collection for NYTM

The date for this event changed . The event will only open on October 5th

Susan Cianciolo and Kiva Motnyk have partnered on the 4th Run Home Collection opening September 26th in New York City at Bridget Donahue Gallery, annual traveling exhibitions and instillations that allow traditional ideas of art and design to be challenged. Run Home collection was created to explore process and collaboration, inviting artists and artisans to contribute in creating parts of the collection, as well as traveling for workshops, mentoring and building creative support. This refreshing approach to collaborative design reflects the ever-evolving spaces we live in, allowing change and growth to be effortlessly integrated into our lives. This years collaborators include professor and author of “Natural Color” Sasha Duerr, Furniture Designer Leon Ransmeier, Ceramic artist Jan Jasiu Krajewski, artist Johanna Tagda, Designer Jessica Ogden and Textile Artist Cara Marie Piazza.

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Photo by by Anna Falck

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Sep
30
3:00 PM15:00

Designer Talk for TEXTILETHINKING Exhibition

Designer Talk for TEXTILETHINKING Exhibition

Please join us Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 3:00pm for a Designer Talk lead by Pratt Institute School of Design’s Dean Anita Cooney. Dean Cooney will discuss with faculty members, Annie Coggan, Alex Goldberg, Jeannine Han and Deborah Schniederman how textiles inform and shape the Fashion and Interior Design Program’s curriculum and student work. The talk will be in the gallery at Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn and will celebrate the TEXTILETHINKING exhibition of textile work in the Pratt Institute School of Design as well as New York Textile Month.

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Sep
30
to Dec 16

Complicated Territory

Complicated Territory: Exhibition featuring Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle curated by Bridget Donlon

Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle create work that delves into the complicated territory of a specific kind of female identity, psychology, and navigation of life. Each artist takes on a contemporary approach to traditionally feminine subjects and forms — interiors, domesticity, self-reflection; florals, pastels, handicraft — to explore and critique this identity. Craft traditions are increasingly embraced by artists who adopt handmade forms, updating them with contemporary concepts and content. Artists Erin M. Riley and Martha Tuttle each take a different approah to fiber-based art and offer unique, fresh perspectives.

On view at Dorsky Gallery  

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Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa                                                                                                                                            Pink color.(noun, Spanish)

Terráqueo                                                                                                                                From planet Earth or related to it. (adjective, Spanish)

Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used, as the colors they yield will shift depending on the alkalinity and hardness of the water they are paired with.

Rosa Terráqueo is a textile exploration of water quality through the lens of botanical dyes. Avocado seeds and a variety of water samples, each with its own level of alkalinity and mineral content, were used to produce a spectrum of pink tones.

The project was inspired by the wide range of pink hues obtained in a series of avocado dye workshops conducted across Europe in the summer of 2017 by Fragmentario.

Upon returning to Brooklyn, experiments began  in order to reproduce the water of various locations using household materials, such as lime and salts to transform the soft, neutral water of New York into a variety of harder, basic and acidic waters. A network of collaborators also provided water samples from around the world– Colombia, France, Greece, India, Japan, Mexico, among others– which were used to map the range of avocado pink hues.

Both experiments were integral in understanding how different markers of water quality affected color. The results were used to infuse a range of hues onto the silk fabrics of the collection.

Rosa Terráqueo seeks to visually illustrate  the significance of water quality and to question how these variables affect our environments and ourselves. Its name is a nod to the global nature of the waters used for the project and the diverse pink hues obtained with  them.

 

Fragmentario

Before the mid-nineteenth century, plants and other natural sources were used across all cultures to color fiber. After the discovery of synthetic dyes, natural dyes were quickly replaced and an important part of civilization was forgotten. Fragmentario seeks to explore natural dyes in a modern context and inspire conversations about cultural heritage and collective memory. 

Fragmentario was founded in Brooklyn in 2016 by Maria Elena Pombo, a fashion design graduate from Parsons School of Design who has worked at Michael Kors and other New York based designers.

Rosa Terráqueo, an accompanying presentation, will be held at A/D/O on 8/28/18 to showcase the ranges of colors achieved with avocado seeds on textiles and clothing.

 RSVP contact info@fragmentario.co

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Sep
28
11:00 AM11:00

Traditional Modern

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Traditional Modern

In this day long, walk-in exhibition, we will be presenting the beautiful handwork from the valleys of Kashmir, the impeccable craftsmanship from the bylanes of Uttar Pradesh and the adornment cultures from the deserts of Gujarat. The folklore of the artisan women from these regions will be further unfolded in the videos and images capturing their clanking bangles and pleasant voices while they sing and precariously embroider the patterns on the cloth.

This display of colorful textiles from the Marasim textile craft library, will be representing that thing of beauty that is a joy forever- showcasing our innovations in the traditional techniques of weaving, felting, embroidering and printing from Gujarat, Jammu & Kashmir and Uttar Pradesh regions of India. Namely- Tangaliya and Patan Patola weaving from Gujarat, Daraz and Mukaish work from Lucknow, Gara and aari embroidery from Gujarat. Sojni and Namdah from Jammu & Kamshmir and many more. You are welcome to sit and watch the videos,  touch and feel the textiles, interact and ask questions. 

Established by Nidhi Garg Allen, a Parsons School of Design graduate and a technologist turned into a fashion Artisan Entrepreneur, Marasim is a NYC based company providing artisanal consultancy, sourcing and manufacturing services to the home, fashion, interior and accessory designers.

There are 10 MM skilled grassroots artisans around the world. Most of them are women. These highly skilled artisans are a part of the world’s biggest untapped and unorganized craft sector. 

Marasim organizes the craft sector- creating opportunities for the millions of artisans at the grassroots. And empowering the designers with the information on processes and cultures associated with various craft techniques and enabling them to collaborate and innovate with the artisans using the lingua franca of design.

This exhibition would not have been possible without the venue support from the very kind Brooklyn fashion and Design Accelerator team.

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Sep
27
to Sep 29

Continuation of Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

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Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by The Stone Barns Center, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 27th to September 30th on view at The Stone Barns Center

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Sep
24
to Sep 30

Josh Faught At MAD

Josh Faught At MAD

Featured in the Museum of Arts and Design’s exhibitions, #MADCollects and the #BurkePrize, Josh Faught (@hjfaught) combines textiles and fiber with found cultural objects to create highly ornamented works that weave together personal and social narratives exploring the history of the queer body. See Josh’s works in ‘MAD Collects: The Future of Craft Part 1’ and ‘The Burke Prize: The Future of Craft Part 2’ at @MADMuseum.  

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Sep
22
to Sep 24

Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by the A/D/O, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 22th to September 24th on view at A/D/O 29 Norman Ave. Brooklyn, NY.

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

The Textile Arts Center is pleased to present Three Walls, the culminating exhibition of the 9th cycle of Artists in Residence.  

During the nine months residency, the eight artists worked alone, together. Their studios comprised only 3 walls; the lack of a fourth wall necessitated that their practices be shared and that their work inspired and conversed with each other.

Sculptural eyes seem to read hidden hand woven messages; a quilt designed to be worn meets a fiber depiction of a body, both crafted to protect; garments that research the dynamic relationship between maker/wearer and explore the complexities of function/value; and found images, layered and transformed, turn into paintings, while found materials are repurposed into sculptures.

The  artists in Three Walls come from a range of creative backgrounds, and the collective body of work featured reflects this variety of experience. However there’s a sense of unity. An empathetic identification. In concept, form, and process, they are companions.

Artists in Three Walls are Jamie Boyle, Rhonda Khalifeh, Junyu Li, Lily Moebes, Meghan O'Sullivan, Cory Siegler, Hannah Whelan and Chang Yuchen.

OPENING RECEPTION: September 20, 6-9pm
ARTIST TALK: September 23, 7pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

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2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

Piecework Collective brings together artists from around the world, using unique aesthetics, processes, and materials to explore traditional patchwork and quilting. The Collective exists as a means to showcase work by contemporary artists - united by a love of the art form, a sense of community, and its connection to history - in order to communicate and strengthen the value of textiles and craftsmanship. The goal of the Collective is to inspire, educate, and foster community through art.

The 2018 Piecework Collective exhibition will feature new work from:  ace&jig, Abigail Booth of Forest + Found, Lindsay Degen of DEGEN, Season Evans, Coulter Fussell of YaloRUN Textiles, Lesley Gold, Ruby Hoppen, Lucia Lienhard-Giesigner of Bosna Quilt Werstatt, Lauren MacDonald of Working Cloth, Lorena Marañon,Kiva Motnyk of Thompson Street Studio, Kyle Parent of KTWP Quilts, and 

opening reception: Thursday, Sept 20th, 6-10pm

Meet the artists Sunday, September 23, 1pm-3pm

 

Friday, Sept 21, 11am-6pm

Saturday, Sept 22, 11am-6pm

Sunday, Sept 23, 11am-6pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 30

Liz Collins: Rays

Liz Collins: Rays

Launched in spring 2018, 1ST SITE is a project space located in MAD’s reception area, dedicated to works that interact with and interpret the interior architecture and ambiance of the entry. This fall, the space will house an installation by Liz Collins, an artist included in the Museum’s permanent collection. The installation is drawn from Collins’ “Rays” wallpaper series, the design of which she completed during her 2015 residency in the MAD Artist Studios Program.

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Sep
18
to Oct 4

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Opening Reception, September 20th at 6:00 pm

The work of FIT students and faculty takes center stage in the Gallery FIT exhibition Crafting Change. Organized by the Textile/Surface Design Department in conjunction with New York Textile Month, the works featured in Crafting Change use long established techniques in a modern context to explore the shifting boundaries between art, design, and technology. The use of hand crafting techniques combined with digital processes, preserves tradition while pushing textiles into the future.  Projects bridging science and textiles have the potential to revolutionize the fashion and textile industries, leading us to a more sustainable world. These works are promising examples of how FIT is successfully encouraging interdisciplinary mergers between craft, technology, and sustainability to usher textile arts into the 21st century.

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Sep
17
to Sep 21

Talant! Showcasing The Finalists For The Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Talent! exhibit showcasing the finalists for the Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Mohawk proudly sponsors this prize to support emerging textile designers

Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort and fellow curator Philip Fimmano are pleased to announce the creation of a new international design prize to be awarded to a textile or fashion design student who exhibits innovative thinking and inspiring creativity in textiles.

The Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize honors Dorothy Waxman, the original driving force behind Trend Union and EDELKOORT INC. in the United States and contributing reporter to the magazines View on Colour, Textile View and Viewpoint. Waxman’s insatiable curiosity and discerning eye for the avant-garde has inspired Edelkoort and her team for decades. Waxman also introduced the American fashion industry to European textile partners with her work at the Fashion Group. As an avid textile aficionado, she believes that creative fabrics can change the design landscape in profound ways.

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Sep
15
to Sep 30

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Conversations On Textiles At The School Of Design, Pratt Institute

This exhibition will highlight the vibrant and provocative conversations that the faculty and
students of the School of Design participate in while interrogating textiles. The field of
textiles is a wellspring of inspiration to both the fashion, product and interior design
program’s material explorations and theoretical thinking.

As they work outside of the academic structure of a traditional textile program, the
students and faculty at the School of Design bring energy, focus and a pragmatic naiveté
to the subject of textiles. The exhibition will illustrate this conversation through student
course work and selected professors’ theoretical and professional endeavors relating to
textiles.

Opening hours: 11AM-6PM

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

The Lori Weitzner Design studio is hosting a one-day, pop-up exhibition of imaginative work created by Textile Design students from Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). The curated designs showcase undergraduate and graduate Textile Designers’ innovations, highlighting the marriage of artisanal processes and the latest technologies. Sustainability, international cultures and maker spaces are emphasized. Join alumni, faculty and students for this exclusive look into the Jefferson Textile Design Bachelor of Science and Master of Science programs.

12pm - 1pm

2pm-3pm

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Sep
13
to Dec 14

From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

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 From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

Opening Reception September 13, 6-8pm

This exhibition, FROM THE DESERT TO THE CITY: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles,  places textiles from Late Antique Egypt in multiple contexts—their original use in the 3rd-7th centuries, their rediscovery in the early 20th century, and their reception in the present day—bringing these colorful remnants of the ancient past to life for today’s audiences.

Centering on the recent gift of 85 textile pieces from the Rose Choron Collection, the exhibition features other works from the Museum’s permanent collection together with loans from the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Opera Archives, and private collections. Works by contemporary artists Caroline Wells Chandler and Gail Rothschild bring the story of the textiles into the 21st century. 

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Sep
10
10:00 AM10:00

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Mid-Career Solo Exhibition
Drawing and Sculpture with Stitch

Through her art practice, internationally celebrated Dublin artist Bernie Leahy picks apart visceral human connections, finding and laying bare the vulnerability in each chosen subject  matter. In this exhibition, Leahy has created an evocative series of stitched drawings and small sculptures, embodied with a variety of media including gold leaf, uncut diamonds and acrylic on linen and canvas. Fragments of the human form—eyes, mouths, glances—capture Leahy’s personal moments and stories and imbues them with a sense of passion and energy.

Her work plays many emotional chords, there is a common thread of kindness and humanity behind all the piecesIrish Arts Review Magazine

Prolific and brave in her use of materials – Dr. Audrey Whitty, National Museum of Ireland

September  10 - December  14  
Gallery  hours  by  appointment    
Monday  –  Friday  |  10  AM  –  6  PM    
Please  call  212-757-3318
 

Artist  Talk  &  Reception  
Monday September  10  
5:30  PM
FREE
Reservations  Encouraged

AT IRISH ARTS CENTER

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Sep
7
to Sep 30

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

The Museum at FIT presents Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color (September 7, 2018–January 5, 2019), organized by the museum’s director and chief curator, Dr. Valerie Steele. Pink features approximately 80 ensembles from the 18th century to the present, with examples by designers and brands such as Elsa Schiaparelli, Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Alessandro Michele of Gucci, Jeremy Scott of Moschino, and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons. The exhibition will be accompanied by a book published by Thames & Hudson and a free symposium on October 19, 2018, that will be livestreamed.

Pink provokes exceptionally strong feelings of both attraction and repulsion. Indeed, it has been called the most divisive of colors. “Please, sisters, back away from the pink,” urged journalist Petula Dvorak in The Washington Post when she learned that tens of thousands of protesters were planning to wear pink pussy hats at the Women’s March of 2017. The issues facing women are “serious,” she added, and “cute” pink hats risked trivializing these issues. Yet attitudes towards pink are changing, and the color is increasingly regarded as cool and androgynous. 

 

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Comme des Garçons, ensemble, Fall 2016, “18th -Century Punk” Collection, Fall/Winter 2016, Japan, museum purchase.

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins' exhibition, Conduition is an iteration of her dynamic visual language, one in which she explores new materials, hybridizes design with sculptural objects, and experiments with scale. Through Collins' use of texture, material, and vibrant color, she generates evocative flows, fields, and vibrations. Her formal and conceptual elements suggest how liquid  landscapes function as energy conduits across a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional works. Among the works on view is a twenty-foot long jacquard woven landscape based on ancient story scrolls, in which a continuous narrative is told across one expansive piece. In addition, Collins' exhibition includes a variety of sculptures made of glass and found objects, and textile paintings made from stretched woven fabrics.

Opening on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8 pm.
Gallery hours: Wednesday through Sunday from 11-6 pm

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Sep
5
to Sep 24

Interlaced At Textile Arts Center

Interlaced Exhibition

Opening Reception: September 5, 6-9pm

Viewing Hours: Saturday - Thursday, 11 am - 6pm (Closed Fridays), and by appointment.

In honor of New York Textile Month, the Textile Arts Center is hosting a collection of exhibitions to highlight the richness of contemporary textiles. Reflecting a diversity of material and technique, "Interlaced" features site-specific installation as well as sculpture, collage, weaving, knitting and embroidery. 

Exhibitions Include:

“Evolution: Ursus americanus” featuring the work of Deborah Simon

“The Gloaming” featuring the work of Megan C. Mosholder

“The Quilted Object” featuring the work of Hannah Goff, Monica Hofstadter, Liz Robb and Pedro Silva

“Rapture of the Deep: The Textile Art of Tzuri Gueta” featuring work by Tzuri Gueta and curated by Ya’ara Keydar

For Inquiries: Tegan Roberts at tegan@textileartscenter.com

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Sep
5
to Oct 7

Matthew Larson: Vice Versa

Vice Versa Matthew Larson

September 5 - October 7, 2018

Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 5th 6:00-8:00pm

Massey Klein is pleased to present Vice Versa, a solo exhibition of new works by Matthew Larson. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York.

Larson's most recent body of work continues his decade-long exploration with fiber. His practice, a highly unique variation on weaving, uses mass-produced and commonly available materials such as acrylic and wool fiber, and velcro. Following a labor-intensive process developed by the artist, Larson embeds individual strands of fiber into velcro mounted on linen, which he then stretches over a panel. Through controlled use of line, he achieves precise patterns and striations of color and texture. Larson’s process defies categorization, transitioning between drawing, painting, sculpture, and weaving.

In Vice Versa, Larson navigates two compositional structures: linear geometry and organic form. Typical of Larson’s geometric approach, the artist establishes the border of the panel as a constraint to drive the overall composition. As the work progresses, variations of color and thickness mimic the vertical and horizontal architecture of weaving. Optically, these works appear to follow a traditional warp and weft structure, but are built on a single plane.

 Larson’s organically composed work is the result of a departure from his symmetry-based technique. Larson builds upon a curvilinear composition consisting of irregular swoops and turns. The change in direction of each strand allows the piece to transform. Depending on the angle at which it is viewed, contrasting highlights and shadows emerge. This transitory effect of light lends itself even further to the organic nature of the composition.

The exhibition’s organization places linear works across from their organic counterparts. Flat Structure, Double Fiction, and Soft Axis, all geometric in nature, hang opposite the large curvilinear piece, Signal. This comparison of form and design emphasizes the power of color and pattern. The gallery’s back room is devoted to smaller, framed work but continues to follow the juxtaposition of form and composition. Three linear works, Outline 1-3, mirror three organic configurations, Inward 1-3, of the same color and size, allowing the viewer to meditate on the subtle differences between groupings.

Matthew Larson received his BFA in painting in 2006 from the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design and has since exhibited internationally and extensively across the country, including at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. Larson lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Please join us on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8pm for the opening reception. The artist will be in

attendance. For press inquiries or information about works available, please email info@masseyklein.com.

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: A Collector’s Eye

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Object Of The Day: A Collector’s Eye

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Author: Donna Ghelerter

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

Cora Ginsburg, who donated this bedcover to the Cooper Hewitt in 1993, knew a bit about eighteenth-century English embroidery. Over her years as an antique dealer in New York specializing in textiles and clothing, Cora held in her hands many pieces of linen and cotton that previously had passed through the hands of the (mostly) anonymous women who took plain-woven cloth and, with their needles, created decorative fantasies. Who wouldn’t want to sleep, and dream, beneath this one?

A peacock flies with angels. Two cranes stand on a sliver of ground. The bedcover’s central medallion, with its border of flame-like leaves, encapsulates both pleasures and dangers. A branching stalk, sinuously growing carnations and pansies, is superimposed on a landscape where a hillock with a hissing snake and placid deer stretches to a faraway castle, and a sky above fades from early morning to midnight blue.
All is impossible yet fully captures the realm of English embroidery where motifs copied from pattern books, bestiaries, and botanical engravings—such as those I poured over with Cora from her collection, including the 1688 A Treatise on Japanning and Varnishin, by John Stalker and George Parker and those by Margaretha Helm from the early eighteenth century that feature motifs similar to those on this bedcover—gave embroiderers license to play with realities of scale, of East and West, of animals actual and mythological.

Cora donated this bedcover in memory of textile scholar Jean Mailey, who worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Textile Study Room from 1959 to 1985. I write this in memory of Cora, whose observant eye and knowing passion for textiles enrich many museum collections today.

Donna Ghelerter is a textile and fashion historian in New York. In 2017, she published Marguerita Mergentime: American Textiles, Modern Ideas, which highlights Mergentime’s life and career as a textile designer in the 1930s.

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Sep
4
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Costumes Normands

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Author: Michele Majer

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This roller-printed furnishing cotton dating about 1827 and depicting young women in “costumes normands” illustrates several aspects of early nineteenth-century French textile production including technique, material, and source of inspiration.

The mechanical innovation of printing on cotton with engraved copper rollers was perfected by the British in the early 1780s and brought to France in 1797 by Christopher Oberkampf, the founder of the renowned printed cotton manufactory in Jouy, outside Paris. Over the next decade, machines were installed in other centers of cotton production including Mulhouse and Nantes. Compared to plate printing that had been in use since the mid-eighteenth century, roller printing was considerably faster, allowing for a significantly larger output in the same amount of time. This, in turn, reduced the costs of and expanded the market for these fabrics that were sought after by middle- and working-class consumers, eager for the latest novelties.

In the second half of the eighteenth century, French manufacturers of printed cottons relied heavily on foreign imports, primarily from Britain and India. However, by the second decade of the nineteenth century, French spinners and weavers were making dress and furnishing cottons in a wider range of qualities and greater quantities than previously. By the mid-1820s, the abundance of domestically produced cottons also contributed to the dramatic increase in consumption and lower prices of this commodity.

Both to entice consumers and in response to their demand, manufacturers offered new designs on a frequent basis. As producers of plate-printed cottons had done in the eighteenth century, firms in the early nineteenth century often drew on engraved sources for inspiration. Historical, biblical, allegorical, mythological, and exotic subjects; scenes from novels, plays, and operas; and genre scenes were all highly popular for furnishing cottons during this period.

Many of the figures in this cotton from the Cooper Hewitt collection derive from an 1827 publication, Costumes des femmes du pays de Caux et de plusieurs autres parties de l’ancienne province de Normandie, that attests to the growing interest in regional traditional dress during the Romantic period. The 105 individual figures in the plates were drawn by the well-known painter and illustrator, Louis-Marie Lanté (1789-1871), and engraved by Georges-Jacques Gatine (ca. 1773-after 1841). Lanté frequently contributed illustrations to the renowned French fashion periodical Journal des Dames et des Modes (1797-1839), that were also engraved by Gatine. In fact, apart from their distinctive, towering headdresses, the young women’s high-waisted dresses with puffed upper sleeves, applied decoration on the bodice and at the hem, and frilled collars are very similar to contemporary fashion plates. Requiring hours of washing, starching, and ironing, the forms of these elaborate headpieces identified the wearer’s town or village in the Norman province. Among Lanté’s figures selected by the cotton’s designer and placed on small islands in groups of two, four, and five are: Cauchoise (Nos. 1 and 9); Costume de Coutances (No. 26); Costume de Rollevilledessiné au Hâvre (No. 36); Costume de Rolleville (No. 37); Costume de Lisieux (No. 40); Costume de Caën (No. 43); Jeune fille de Bayeux (Nos. 49 and 52); and Costume de Saint-Valery en Caux (No. 57). The monochromatic palette (here, sepia colored) is characteristic of roller-printed cottons as is the short repeat, disguised by a dense filling pattern of stylized flowers and foliage.

 

Michele Majer is Assistant Professor at Bard Graduate Center in New York, where she teaches courses in eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century fashion and textiles. In 2012, she curated a BGC Focus Gallery exhibition, Staging Fashion, 1880-1920: Jane Hading, Lily Elsie, Billie Burke, and contributed to and edited the accompanying catalogue. She is also Research Associate at Cora Ginsburg LLC and is a regular contributor to the annual catalogues.

Click here


 

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Sep
3
to Sep 27

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts

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Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends.

Monday - Thursday, 11am - 5pm.

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Map Quilt, artist unidentified, possibly Virginia, 1886, silk and cotton with silk embroidery, 78 3/4 × 82 1/4 in., gift of Dr. and Mrs. C. David McLaughlin, 1987.1.1. Photo by Schecter Lee.

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Sep
3
to Sep 29

Fabrications: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

Fabrications: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

The Milliners Guild is comprised of professional hat makers from around the US. This exhibition will showcase the unique designs of 17 Guild members, each creating a hat using innovative millinery techniques and featuring beautiful textiles from premier NYC Garment District supplier B&J Fabrics. Textile categories will include laces, brocades, tweeds and prints.

The Milliners Guild is a non-profit organization committed to increasing the public profile of millinery as well as the public's awareness and interest in millinery products. Through a collective website, special events and educational seminars the Guild provides communication about this thriving and contemporary industry to the public, press and students of the craft.

Participants:

Kathy Anderson, Linda Ashton, Sally Caswell, Wanda Chambers, Ellen Colon Lugo, Rosael Torres Davis, Laura del Villaggio, Jennifer Hoertz, Lisa McFadden, Karen Morris, Evetta Petty, Lisa Shaub, Judith Solodkin, Monika Stebbins, Mergie Trembley, Barbara Volker 

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Sep
3
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Wearing Wealth

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Object Of The Day: Wearing Wealth

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Author: Sumru Belger Krody

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This robe was once adorned a high official of the court of Bukhara, an ancient city nestled in one of Central Asia’s fertile oases. Surrounded by lush orchards and fields, the city was the center of power for the Manghit dynasty’s Bukharan Khanate from 1785 until the 1920 takeover by the Soviet Union.

Centuries of political turmoil and instability in Central Asia preceding the nineteenth century created an environment that compelled people to accumulate and invest their wealth in portable items such as textiles and jewelry. Textiles were light, made with expensive materials, required costly labor to produce, and did not lose their value.

Central Asian costume in the nineteenth century consisting of layered garments made out of luxurious materials and a variety of headgear, jewelry, ornaments, and accessories, was a feast to the eyes of many travelers to the region. Each garment had myriad bright colors, was cut full, and hung loose with flowing lines. Although our contemporary eyes may consider the resulting silhouette bulky, Central Asian people wore many layers of clothing not only to protect themselves from the elements, but also to show off their wealth, and thus their importance in society. This was the accepted aesthetic of the times.

It could be argued that wearing one’s wealth was the vestige of a nomadic past still lingering among the long settled former nomadic societies. Because textiles meant wealth, they were treated with respect. They were kept in the family, recycled for generations, and when they were constructed, fabrics were minimally cut so there was no waste. This practice follows a pattern well known among many textile-producing cultures, where so much effort goes into making the cloth itself that none is wasted, so people in these societies choose to wear garments that are loosely tailored without any angling and sculpting.

The large size of the robe called chapan and straight cut under the arms indicate that it was made for a man. It is also particularly sumptuous, indicating that wearer had wealth to lavish on a garment such as this. The outer layer of the garment was composed of silk fabric embellished with metallic-wrapped silk supplementary weft yarns creating a sumptuous ogival lattice. Photographs taken in Bukhara and Samarkand in the nineteenth-century, show emirs as well as many high officials such as judges wearing this type of robe.

The lining of the robe is also luxurious ikat fabric. Ikat derives its name from the technique used to decorate fabric, wherein parts of the warp or weft yarns are tightly bound in order to resist dye penetration. The bold and colorful designs of ikat fabrics are created before the yarns are woven into cloth. The colors and design of the ikat used inside of this robe indicate that the fabrics were tailored into a robe in the second half of the nineteenth century and trimmed with silk band all along the edges of the robe.

Sumru Belger Krody is Senior Curator at George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863)"

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Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863)

Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863) explores the confluence of art, love, science, and religion in the extraordinary art of Orra White Hitchcock, one of America’s first female scientific illustrators. Her marriage in 1821 to Amherst College professor Edward Hitchcock cemented a years-long friendship and collaboration based on a bedrock of faith and science, mutual respect, close observation, and mental capacity for the largest of ideas. Orra White exhibited a prodigious scientific mind and abundant artistic talent at an early age. The exhibition traces her development from schoolgirl projects to highly accomplished renderings of the natural scenery of the Connecticut River Valley used in her husband’s many geology publications. 

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Mastodon maximus. Cuv. [After Georges Cuvier], Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863), Amherst, Massachusetts, 1828–1840, Pen and ink and watercolor wash on cotton, with woven tape binding, 25 1/2 x 37",  Amherst College Archives & Special Collections

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Sep
1
to Sep 2

Thomas Bayrle: Playtime

Thomas Bayrle: Playtime

This solo exhibition—Bayrle’s first major New York museum survey—brings together works from the last fifty years, highlighting Bayrle’s experiments across media and their prescient commentary on the relationship between consumerism, technology, propaganda, and desire.

One of the most important artists to have emerged during the 1960s West German economic boom, Bayrle has received belated recognition for his influential works and processes. Long before the advent of current visual technologies, he foresaw our digital reality, employing photocopy machines and other midcentury tools in his early works to create analog visualizations of what are now fundamental traits of our digital culture. Bayrle’s thematic investigations have ranged from a visual analysis of mass culture and consumerism to reflections on the intersection of technology with global politics.

The exhibition highlights how the artist has expanded his serial patterns beyond traditional artworks into textiles, wallpaper, carpeting, and garments.

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iPhone Pietà, 2017 Silk, linen, cotton, and natural viscose Tapestry by Atelier Patrick Guillot, Aubusson 98 1/2 x 98 1/2 in (250 x 250 cm) Produced in cooperation with MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art, Vienna Courtesy the artist

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