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Apr
12
to Jul 12

Nature By Design

  • Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Nature By Design: Selections From The Permanent Collection

To accompany the special exhibition Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, Nature by Design presents nine distinct stories drawn from Cooper Hewitt’s collection of over 210,000 design objects. Throughout history, designers have observed nature, investigated its materials, and imitated and abstracted its patterns and shapes. Textiles, jewelry, furniture, cutlery, and more show how designers have interpreted nature’s rich beauty and astonishing complexity. Across scales from microscopic to monumental, and in forms familiar and unusual, we invite visitors to discover how nature and design have intersected in the past and continue to converge in our world.

Katagami — March 30–oct. 27

This exhibition highlights the traditional Japanese craft of katagami: paper stencils carved by master artisans for use in decorating textiles. These stencils often take nature as their subject, and are made from natural materials. Cooper Hewitt’s collection of katagami mostly dates to the late Edo (1603-1868) and Meiji (1868-1912) eras, when the craft was at its height. The works on view demonstrate a range of styles and cutting techniques, reflecting the great expressive potential of the medium.

To create the stencils, pounded mulberry bark is treated with fermented persimmon juice, resulting in a paper that is strong, flexible, and waterproof. Once the paper has been cut, thin silk threads are sometimes added in order to reinforce the design. These treatments are necessary because, since at least the 16th century, katagami have been employed in a dyeing technique called katazome. In this method, a highly-skilled dyer places the paper stencil over prepared fabric and applies a dye-resistant rice paste (or “resist”) through the stencil. This process is then repeated along the fabric’s length, creating an unbroken pattern. Later, when the fabric is dyed—usually with natural indigo—the areas protected by the resist remain untouched by the color. Finally, when the resist is washed away, the finished textile retains the stencil’s design.

Embroidered And Embellished — March 30–Oct. 27

A fanciful, romantic, and stylized interpretation of nature embellished men’s waistcoats in 18th-century France.  Realistic and exaggerated flowers were the preferred form of decoration and displayed the exceptional skills of France’s embroidery professionals, who employed a painterly approach that required a sophisticated color sense and delicate rendering of light and shadow to amplify the brightness of the florals. A majority of the superb waistcoats and samples in this gallery were bequeathed to Cooper Hewitt by  Richard C. Greenleaf, who in the early 20th century assembled one of the most important collections of European textiles and lace in the United States. The waistcoats, along with embroidery samples and their related designs on paper, illustrate the exquisite artistry and incomparable craftsmanship that made French design the standard for men’s dress across the royal courts of Europe.

Among the most fashionable piece of clothing for a gentleman of the ancien régime, a white silk waistcoat was the perfect canvas for displaying elaborately designed floral frameworks. To set the fashion, a gentleman needed dozens, if not hundreds, of waistcoats festooned not only with beautiful flowers, but clever references that sparked conversation. Faced with a growing demand for novelty, embroidery designers began adding animals, insects, romantic vistas, and even cultural and historical references to heighten the whimsy and topicality of their waistcoat designs. Close examination reveals the gold and silver thread, sequins, seed pearls, faceted glass, and paste beads that elevated men’s clothing to a height of elegance and intricacy rarely seen since.


Paisley — April 12–Nov. 11

Design’s tear-drop shaped motif popularly known as paisley has persisted, and its timeline of design variations reflect a diversity of natural forms. Everything from a flowering plant with its roots attached to a slender cypress tree with bent tip to a serpentine and elongated scroll have been stylized and expressed in paisley’s ornamental grammar. It is a design that for centuries has evolved with the fashion and interior styles of cultures around the world, with a complex history revealing an amalgamation of influences from Persia, India, and Europe. Integrally tied to the shawls handwoven in Kashmir during the 18th and 19th centuries, paisley derives its name from the Scottish town that became famous for producing imitation Kashmir shawls in the 19th century. Often infilled with flowers, more paisleys, and even jewels, the motif is constantly revisited by designers as we see in this display of over 80 objects from the collection—many shown for the first time. Designers, such as Etro, Zandra Rhodes, and Maharam are drawn to this timeless shape and its inherent vitality. And perhaps the secret to paisley’s immortality is the way its traditions have been adapted to combine conformity with the spirit of a wild child.

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May
9
to Sep 8

Camp: Notes on Fashion

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Camp: Notes on Fashion

On view at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art Through more than 250 objects dating from the seventeenth century to the present, The Costume Institute's spring 2019 exhibition explores the origins of camp's exuberant aesthetic. Susan Sontag's 1964 essay "Notes on 'Camp'" provides the framework for the exhibition, which examines how the elements of irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration are expressed in fashion.

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Jun
4
to Sep 29

Phenomenal Nature : Mrinalini Mukherjee

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015).  Vriksh Nata  ( Arboreal Enactment ), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015). Vriksh Nata (Arboreal Enactment), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

Phenomenal Nature : Mrinalini Mukherjee

Phenomenal Nature marks the first retrospective of the artist in the United States. The exhibition brings together fifty-seven works by Mukherjee and explores the artist's longstanding engagement with fiber, along with her significant forays into ceramic and bronze towards the middle and latter half of her career.

A committed sculptor who worked intuitively, Mukherjee explored the divide between figuration and abstraction. Nature was her primary inspiration, and she was further informed by her enthusiasm for Indian historic sculpture, modern design, and local crafts and textile traditions. Phenomenal Nature highlights the radical intervention Mukherjee made in her adaptation of crafting techniques with a modernist formalism.

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015). Vriksh Nata (Arboreal Enactment), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

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Jun
6
to Sep 8

Diedrick Brackens: darling divined

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Diedrick Brackens: Darling Divined

For the artist’s first institutional solo exhibition in New York, Brackens presents a new installation of weavings in the New Museum’s Lobby Gallery.

Cover Image:

Diedrick Brackensthe cup is a cloud, 2018. Cotton yarn, acrylic yarn, and mirrors, 74 × 78 in (188 × 198.1 cm). Courtesy the artist

Diedrick Brackens (b. 1989, Mexia, TX) constructs intricately woven textiles that speak to the complexities of black and queer identity in the United States. Interlacing diverse traditions, including West African weaving, European tapestries, and quilting from the American south, Brackens creates cosmographic abstractions and figurative narratives that lyrically merge lived experience, commemoration, and allegory. He uses both commercial dyes and unconventional colorants such as wine, tea, and bleach, and foregrounds the loaded symbolism of materials like cotton, with its links to the transatlantic slave trade.

This exhibition is curated by Margot Norton, Curator, and Francesca Altamura, Curatorial Assistant.

Diedrick Brackens (b. 1989, Mexia, TX) lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. Recent solo exhibitions include “hearts, hands, and other members,” Conduit Gallery, Dallas (2015); “a slow reckoning,” Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University (2017); and “unholy ghosts,” Various Small Fires, Los Angeles (2019). Group exhibitions include Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; McColl Center for Art+Innovation, Charlotte; Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; Dimensions Variable, Miami; Denny Gallery, New York; Biola University, La Mirada; Patterson-Appleton Arts Center, Denton; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery; Marin Community Foundation, Novato; Work Gallery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; SOMArts, San Francisco; and the 3rd Ghetto Biennale, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Brackens was in residence at Long Beach Museum of Art in 2017, and at the Joan Michell Center in 2016.


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Jun
10
to Jan 20

Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

  • Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

Designers are forging meaningful connections with nature, inspired by its properties and resources. Their collaborative processes—working with nature and in teams across multiple disciplines—are optimistic responses at this moment when humans contend with the complexities and conditions of our planet. Compelled by a sense of urgency, designers look to nature as a guide and partner.

With projects ranging from experimental prototypes to consumer products, immersive installations, and architectural constructions, Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, co-organized with Cube design museum, presents the work of sixty-two international design teams. Collaborations involve scientists, engineers, advocates for social and environmental justice, artists, and philosophers. They are engaging with nature in innovative and ground-breaking ways, driven by a profound awareness of climate change and ecological crises as much as advances in science and technology.

The exhibition themes explore seven strategies that designers are using to collaborate with nature—to understand, remediate, simulate, salvage, nurture, augment, and facilitate. The outcomes are speculative or practical and reveal new materials, creative methods, and inventive technologies. These provocations and solutions put forth by today’s extraordinary design teams serve as encouragement for an enduring and more respectful partnership with nature.

Curatorial teams from both museums developed the exhibition content, including Cooper Hewitt’s Caitlin Condell, associate curator and head of Drawings, Prints & Graphic Design; Andrea Lipps, associate curator of contemporary design; Matilda McQuaid, deputy director of curatorial and head of Textiles; and Caroline O’Connell, curatorial assistant; and Cube’s Gene Bertrand, program and development director; and Hans Gubbels, director of Cube.

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Jun
20
to Sep 29

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

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Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is the first New York retrospective in forty years to focus on the legendary couturier. Drawn primarily from Pierre Cardin’s archive, the exhibition traverses the designer’s decades-long career at the forefront of fashion invention. Known today for his bold, futuristic looks of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, Cardin extended his design concepts from fashion to furniture, industrial design, and beyond.

The exhibition presents over 170 objects drawn from his atelier and archive, including historical and contemporary haute couture, prêt-à-porter, trademark accessories, “couture” furniture, lighting, fashion sketches, personal photographs, and excerpts from television, documentaries, and feature films. The objects are displayed in an immersive environment inspired by Cardin’s unique atelier designs, showrooms, and homes.

Highlights of Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion include rare designs in luxury fabrics from the 1950s; a large grouping from the landmark 1964 “Cosmocorps” collection, which sought to streamline menswear by eliminating excessive detailing; creations that incorporate vinyls, plastics, and the self-named Cardine synthetic fabric; signature unisex ensembles featuring full knit bodysuits with layered skirts, vests, bibs, and jewelry; iconic broad-shouldered jackets from the 1980s based on Japanese origami, Chinese architecture, and American football uniforms; “illuminated” jumpsuits and dresses; recent couture eveningwear; and an extensive overview of Cardin’s recently designed couture menswear.

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is curated and designed by Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum

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Aug
7
to Sep 29

Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall

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Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall

On view at the Brooklyn Museum: Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall Commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising—a six-day clash between police and civilians ignited by a routine raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City—and explores its profound legacy within contemporary art and visual culture today. The exhibition draws its title from the rallying words of transgender artist and activist Marsha P. Johnson, underscoring both the precariousness and the vitality of LGBTQ+ communities. The exhibition presents twenty-eight LGBTQ+ artists born after 1969 whose works grapple with the unique conditions of our political time, and question how moments become monuments. Through painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and video, these artists engage interconnected themes of revolt, commemoration, care, and desire.


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Aug
8
to Jan 26

Vera Paints a Scarf

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Vera Paints a Scarf

Vera Paints a Scarf celebrates the work of artist Vera Neumann (1907-1993) and her contributions to the field of American design. Neumann was among the most successful female design entrepreneurs of the 20th century, and an originator of the American lifestyle brand. Over the course of her career, which spanned from her label’s debut in 1942 to her death in 1993, Neumann produced an iconic line of women's scarves all signed with a cursive “Vera” and stamped with a ladybug, as well as thousands of textile patterns based on her drawings, paintings, and collages. This exhibition will be the first to comprehensively examine her career—and highlights the keys to her success: her joyful and inventive aesthetic, democratic design ethos, fusion of craft and mass production, and clever marketing.

Telling the story of the artist behind the Vera brand, Vera Paints a Scarf  will offer a selection of paintings produced in Neumann’s preferred technique, Japanese sumi-e (ink painting), from which her textile designs derive. The exhibition will then continue with a broad exploration of her design work through over two hundred objects from her lines for the home and women’s fashion produced between 1950 and 1980, including original works on paper, textiles and garments, archival photographs and video, as well as the ephemera related to the company’s marketing campaigns, which ingeniously used the tagline “Vera paints” to promote her mass-market label.

Vera Paints a Scarf: The Art and Design of Vera Neumann is curated by Elissa Auther, MAD’s Windgate Research and Collections Curator with the support of Curatorial Assistant Alida Jekabson. Additional support was provided by Rachael Schwabe and George Tiger Liu.

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Sep
3
to Sep 30

A Milliner's Studio: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

  • 215 West 38th Street, New York, NY 10018 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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A Milliner's Studio: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

To celebrate NY Textile Month, the Milliners Guild will have hats on display in the Garment Center’s 38th Street window, sponsored by the Garment District Alliance. The space will be designed as a vignette of a milliner’s studio with hats displayed throughout.

The Milliners Guild is comprised of professional hat makers from around the US. This exhibition will showcase the designs of 24 Guild members, each creating a Fall hat using using our Guild brand colors. There will be a range of innovative millinery techniques and beautiful textiles including fur felts, silk, leather and wool.

Please stop by the window and take a look when you visit the Garment District during Textile Month.

The Milliners Guild is a non-profit organization committed to increasing the public profile of millinery as well as the public's awareness and interest in millinery products. Through a collective website, special events and educational seminars the Guild provides communication about this thriving and contemporary industry to the public, press and students of the craft.

Participating milliners include:
Linda Ashton (NY), Kathy Anderson (NY), Laura Moser (KY), Ellen Christine (NY), Evetta Petty (NY), Wanda Chambers (NY), Katie Props-Allen (NC), Jennifer Hoertz (NY), Lisa McFadden (NY), Sally Caswell (NY), Amy Fowler (CA), Judith Solodkin (NY), Sheree Tams (NY), Laura Del Villaggio (TX), Barbara Volker (NY), Kim Fraser (NC), Monika Stebbins (NJ), Amina Hood (MO) Lisa Shaub (NY), Michael McCants (NY), Maria Koruz (NY), June Gumbel (NY), Maria Etkind (LA), Karen Morris (MN)


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Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

Threads: Changing Lives Stitch by Stitch

  • Fashion Institute of Technology, Katie Murphy Amphitheater (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Threads: Changing Lives Stitch by Stitch

Please join us for a screening of the documentary film THREADS, followed by a discussion with the filmmaker and FIT graduate Yasmine Dabbous.

THREADS tells the story of Surayia Rahman, a Bangladeshi artist, who uses the ancient Bengali quilt work tradition of Kantha to help other women rise from the despair of poverty to support their families, leaving a legacy of beauty and sustainable livelihoods behind. Surayia Rahman’s designs, stitched by artisans of Bangladesh are in the permanent collections of Royal Collection Trust (United Kingdom), Textile Museum of Canada, the Embroiderer’s Guild of America, Fukuoka Asian Art Museum (Japan), and Powerhouse Museum (Australia).

After the film there will be discussion and q&a with the filmmaker Cathy Stevaluk and FIT graduate Yasmine Dabbous. 


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Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

NYTM Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

Intermediate/ Beginner Level Knitting- Intro to Color Work, Intro to Cables

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Sep
15
1:00 PM13:00

Open Studio: WE GATHER

WE GATHER Weaving Circle

Celebrate the magic of making textiles by hand and join us at WE GATHER’s Weaving Circle. Bring your own loom or come as you are and use one of ours. All skill levels are welcome, from complete beginner to total master. WE GATHER owner and textile artist Whitney Crutchfield will offer short tutorials on basic weaving skills, and we’ll have some of our favorite studio yarns on hand for textile experimentation. Stay all afternoon or just for a few minutes, and enjoy the company of others and the satisfaction of creating cloth. 

WE GATHER is a Brooklyn-based educational textile studio and brand of hand-dyed, handwoven textiles. Whether through thoughtfully and ethically-made products made right in the Brooklyn studio, at-home weaving and dyeing kits, or workshops and private events that put the skills directly in your hands, our goal is to bring the magic of textiles to all.    This event is free and open to the public, though limited spaces are available. Kindly RSVP to reserve a spot. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

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Sep
15
11:00 AM11:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

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Sep
13
7:00 PM19:00

Techno-Love Series At Fridman Gallery

Techno-Love Series Fridman Gallery, September 2018

For New York Textile Month, Weaving Hand  will participate by offering workshops for the duration of the month as well as hosting an interactive wearable dance performance towards the middle of September in lower Manhattan. The performance will be a celebratory experience that includes participants of other NYTM events, in addition to creating a fun and engaging atmosphere for everyone involved. During the course of the month, the company will be offering workshops and studio tours as well.

“Techno-Love Series 2018” 

fridman gallery will host a performative series of wearable woven cocoons, Techno-Love Series, an interactive audiovisual exhibit featured in the MAD Museum (madmuseum.org/events/ techno-love-series). They are inspired by the experiences of a recent revelatory experience enjoyed by artist Cynthia Alberto at a desert musical festival. The shape and style of the cocoons are meant to mirror the functions of Sensory Pressure Vests, which are weighted vests that are to be placed onto children or individuals who are overly stimulated to weigh them into place. They will be statically placed, but visitors can take them down and wear them on their bodies. The cocoons are built using traditional weaving methods, and utilize recycled rope from another project - MoMA’s 2016 “Weaving the Courtyard” exhibit. On the evening of September 13th, 2018 at 7PM, there will be a choreographed live performance of the pieces in a 20-minute show with electronic music, and a troupe of dancers.

Zakhele Zamisa is a New York-based music producer with a knack for hip-hop, electronic music, and their respective subgenres. He is curating the soundtrack that will serve as the backdrop to Cynthia Alberto’s interactive audiovisual exhibit Techno-Love Series.

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Sep
10
to Oct 4

Steam Stretch at Issey Miyake Tribeca

Steam Stretch at Issey Miyake Tribeca

 

Steam Stretch is a technique by which creases are woven into A Piece Of Cloth using heat reactive thread which shrinks when steam is applied to the garment. The two techniques combined to form the basis of Steam Stretch are: PLEATS, which was born in the late 1980s as a result of a constant quest for new material and technique development; and A-POC – an acronym for A Piece Of Cloth - is the approach developed in the late 1990s where garments are made by a single-form creation process. Clothes are first made into shapes and then pleated. Using this “stretchable thread,” both vertically and horizontally in the weave, it enables the fabric to be stretched or shrunk in any direction. By the simple application of steam to the cloth, the fabric that was at first flat, instantly transforms to take on a 3D form with countless surfaces, following the contours of the designed creases.

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Sep
10
10:00 AM10:00

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Mid-Career Solo Exhibition
Drawing and Sculpture with Stitch

Through her art practice, internationally celebrated Dublin artist Bernie Leahy picks apart visceral human connections, finding and laying bare the vulnerability in each chosen subject  matter. In this exhibition, Leahy has created an evocative series of stitched drawings and small sculptures, embodied with a variety of media including gold leaf, uncut diamonds and acrylic on linen and canvas. Fragments of the human form—eyes, mouths, glances—capture Leahy’s personal moments and stories and imbues them with a sense of passion and energy.

Her work plays many emotional chords, there is a common thread of kindness and humanity behind all the piecesIrish Arts Review Magazine

Prolific and brave in her use of materials – Dr. Audrey Whitty, National Museum of Ireland

September  10 - December  14  
Gallery  hours  by  appointment    
Monday  –  Friday  |  10  AM  –  6  PM    
Please  call  212-757-3318
 

Artist  Talk  &  Reception  
Monday September  10  
5:30  PM
FREE
Reservations  Encouraged

AT IRISH ARTS CENTER

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Sep
9
10:00 AM10:00

Fellow Focus: Lexy Ho-Tai

Fellow Focus: Lexy Ho-Tai

In Kookerville, MAD’s Fall 2017 Van Lier Fellow Lexy Ho-Tai presents mixed-media artworks and soft sculptures crafted from found and recycled materials, exploring the intersection between craft and play. As part of the Museum’s Fellow Focus series, the exhibition considers art and accessibility in the context of Kookerville, an imagined world created by Ho-Tai, which will be activated by a culminating participatory performance.

In Kookerville, our inner children are manifested in brightly colored creatures called Kookers, constructed with detachable parts such as instruments and masks to encourage public participation. The creatures’ large scale, bright colors, and whimsical demeanor spark spontaneous moments of human connection and social disruption through play and absurdity.

Ho-Tai conceived the ongoing project in 2015, as a temporary escape—a world of healing through joy, color, and imagination—and a catalyst for unleashing viewers’ creativity and self-expression. She offers the alternative world as an opportunity for visitors to reevaluate their own world and imagine new possibilities, however unexpected or “kooky” they may be. 

On view in the sixth-floor Project Space, Kookerville is the fourth installation of the MAD Education Department’s Fellow Focus series. Dedicated to highlighting the work of alumni of the Van Lier Fellowship, part of MAD’s Artist Studios program, Fellow Focus invites these emerging artists to showcase the artwork they produced while in residence at the Museum. Funds for the Van Lier Fellowship are provided by the New York Community Trust Van Lier Fellowship Program, which supports talented, culturally diverse, economically challenged young people who are seriously dedicated to careers in the arts.

Lexy Ho-Tai is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily with found and recycled materials using traditional craft techniques. As a teaching artist, she emphasizes collaboration, engagement, and participatory projects as integral to her practice. Interested in the intersection between art making and social change, she explores themes of human connectivity and female empowerment as well as narratives of the inner child to produce work that is humorous, playful, and interactive. Ho-Tai earned a BFA in Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design and also studied textiles at Central Saint Martins, London.

Kookerville is organized by Cathleen Lewis, Vice President of Education and Programs, and Marissa Passi, Coordinator of Public Programs, for the MAD Education Department. 

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Sep
8
8:00 PM20:00

SHAWNA WU TEXTILE & GARMENT ARTIST - PRESENTED ANTIANTI VIDEOVIDEO W LIVE PERFORMANCE BY SLODOWN

  • 338 Moffat Street, Unif F, Brooklyn, NY 11237 US (map)
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Shawna Wu Textile & Garment Artist - Presented Antianti Videovideo W Live Performance By Slodown

As part of Design Agency ANTIANTI studio's VIDEOVIDEO Series, Shawna Wu is presenting a live fashion installation and artist video, featuring handcrafted textiles and natural dyeing with Asian ingredients. 

Shawna Wu (b. Singapore) is a New York based Taiwanese artist who works sensuously with garments and textiles. "A dressing is for a wound..." - Her work explores the ways in which materials address our understandings of (and gaps in) intimacy, empathy and cultural nuance. Much of her practice draws influence from her Eastern-Western cultural hybridity to find ways to learn and innovate from ancient, alternative sources of knowledge and culture. In a similar vein, she is interested in sustainable practices in fashion and textiles, and her works are labors of love elevated through handweaving and handknit craftsmanship, reiterating the idea of a deliberate, thoughtful material consciousness.

Soul RnB singer SLODOWN will also be cohosting with a live performance and dropping the debut of his latest music video! Stop by to learn and share with one another! See you there!

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Sep
8
2:00 PM14:00

Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott At Tac

  • Textile Arts Center - Manhattan Studio (map)
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Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident At Tac

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. In addition to her artistic practice, she is an advocate for accessible technology education, sharing tutorials for working with DIY electronics on urbanarmor.org. 

During her time at the WIP Residency, McDermott will be completing a large skirt covered in speakers, titled Urban Armor #8: The Public Speaker. Production research for this project has included the creation of numerous custom speaker experiments using materials such as conductive thread and magnets. The current iteration of the project uses low-cost, pre-fabricated speakers, individually soldered to mini-amplifiers, and sewn into the garment. The Public Speaker will ultimately be linked to a microphone, and will playback sounds it picks up as the wearer moves through the city, as a kind of mockingbird/surveillance machine. The Public Speaker is part of Urban Armor, a larger series of experimental wearable electronics which respond to environmental and urban data in unique and ridiculous ways, in an effort to bridge the gap between speculative, virtual and physical spaces.  

Kathleen holds a BFA in Sculpture from Cornell University, an MFA in Creative Media from City University of Hong Kong, and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Electronic Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is currently a Visiting Industry Assistant Professor of Integrated Digital Media (IDM) at NYU

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Sep
7
to Sep 30

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

The Museum at FIT presents Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color (September 7, 2018–January 5, 2019), organized by the museum’s director and chief curator, Dr. Valerie Steele. Pink features approximately 80 ensembles from the 18th century to the present, with examples by designers and brands such as Elsa Schiaparelli, Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Alessandro Michele of Gucci, Jeremy Scott of Moschino, and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons. The exhibition will be accompanied by a book published by Thames & Hudson and a free symposium on October 19, 2018, that will be livestreamed.

Pink provokes exceptionally strong feelings of both attraction and repulsion. Indeed, it has been called the most divisive of colors. “Please, sisters, back away from the pink,” urged journalist Petula Dvorak in The Washington Post when she learned that tens of thousands of protesters were planning to wear pink pussy hats at the Women’s March of 2017. The issues facing women are “serious,” she added, and “cute” pink hats risked trivializing these issues. Yet attitudes towards pink are changing, and the color is increasingly regarded as cool and androgynous. 

 

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Comme des Garçons, ensemble, Fall 2016, “18th -Century Punk” Collection, Fall/Winter 2016, Japan, museum purchase.

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins' exhibition, Conduition is an iteration of her dynamic visual language, one in which she explores new materials, hybridizes design with sculptural objects, and experiments with scale. Through Collins' use of texture, material, and vibrant color, she generates evocative flows, fields, and vibrations. Her formal and conceptual elements suggest how liquid  landscapes function as energy conduits across a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional works. Among the works on view is a twenty-foot long jacquard woven landscape based on ancient story scrolls, in which a continuous narrative is told across one expansive piece. In addition, Collins' exhibition includes a variety of sculptures made of glass and found objects, and textile paintings made from stretched woven fabrics.

Opening on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8 pm.
Gallery hours: Wednesday through Sunday from 11-6 pm

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Sep
5
to Sep 24

Interlaced At Textile Arts Center

Interlaced Exhibition

Opening Reception: September 5, 6-9pm

Viewing Hours: Saturday - Thursday, 11 am - 6pm (Closed Fridays), and by appointment.

In honor of New York Textile Month, the Textile Arts Center is hosting a collection of exhibitions to highlight the richness of contemporary textiles. Reflecting a diversity of material and technique, "Interlaced" features site-specific installation as well as sculpture, collage, weaving, knitting and embroidery. 

Exhibitions Include:

“Evolution: Ursus americanus” featuring the work of Deborah Simon

“The Gloaming” featuring the work of Megan C. Mosholder

“The Quilted Object” featuring the work of Hannah Goff, Monica Hofstadter, Liz Robb and Pedro Silva

“Rapture of the Deep: The Textile Art of Tzuri Gueta” featuring work by Tzuri Gueta and curated by Ya’ara Keydar

For Inquiries: Tegan Roberts at tegan@textileartscenter.com

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Sep
5
to Oct 7

Matthew Larson: Vice Versa

Vice Versa Matthew Larson

September 5 - October 7, 2018

Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 5th 6:00-8:00pm

Massey Klein is pleased to present Vice Versa, a solo exhibition of new works by Matthew Larson. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York.

Larson's most recent body of work continues his decade-long exploration with fiber. His practice, a highly unique variation on weaving, uses mass-produced and commonly available materials such as acrylic and wool fiber, and velcro. Following a labor-intensive process developed by the artist, Larson embeds individual strands of fiber into velcro mounted on linen, which he then stretches over a panel. Through controlled use of line, he achieves precise patterns and striations of color and texture. Larson’s process defies categorization, transitioning between drawing, painting, sculpture, and weaving.

In Vice Versa, Larson navigates two compositional structures: linear geometry and organic form. Typical of Larson’s geometric approach, the artist establishes the border of the panel as a constraint to drive the overall composition. As the work progresses, variations of color and thickness mimic the vertical and horizontal architecture of weaving. Optically, these works appear to follow a traditional warp and weft structure, but are built on a single plane.

 Larson’s organically composed work is the result of a departure from his symmetry-based technique. Larson builds upon a curvilinear composition consisting of irregular swoops and turns. The change in direction of each strand allows the piece to transform. Depending on the angle at which it is viewed, contrasting highlights and shadows emerge. This transitory effect of light lends itself even further to the organic nature of the composition.

The exhibition’s organization places linear works across from their organic counterparts. Flat Structure, Double Fiction, and Soft Axis, all geometric in nature, hang opposite the large curvilinear piece, Signal. This comparison of form and design emphasizes the power of color and pattern. The gallery’s back room is devoted to smaller, framed work but continues to follow the juxtaposition of form and composition. Three linear works, Outline 1-3, mirror three organic configurations, Inward 1-3, of the same color and size, allowing the viewer to meditate on the subtle differences between groupings.

Matthew Larson received his BFA in painting in 2006 from the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design and has since exhibited internationally and extensively across the country, including at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. Larson lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Please join us on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8pm for the opening reception. The artist will be in

attendance. For press inquiries or information about works available, please email info@masseyklein.com.

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: A Collector’s Eye

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Object Of The Day: A Collector’s Eye

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Author: Donna Ghelerter

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

Cora Ginsburg, who donated this bedcover to the Cooper Hewitt in 1993, knew a bit about eighteenth-century English embroidery. Over her years as an antique dealer in New York specializing in textiles and clothing, Cora held in her hands many pieces of linen and cotton that previously had passed through the hands of the (mostly) anonymous women who took plain-woven cloth and, with their needles, created decorative fantasies. Who wouldn’t want to sleep, and dream, beneath this one?

A peacock flies with angels. Two cranes stand on a sliver of ground. The bedcover’s central medallion, with its border of flame-like leaves, encapsulates both pleasures and dangers. A branching stalk, sinuously growing carnations and pansies, is superimposed on a landscape where a hillock with a hissing snake and placid deer stretches to a faraway castle, and a sky above fades from early morning to midnight blue.
All is impossible yet fully captures the realm of English embroidery where motifs copied from pattern books, bestiaries, and botanical engravings—such as those I poured over with Cora from her collection, including the 1688 A Treatise on Japanning and Varnishin, by John Stalker and George Parker and those by Margaretha Helm from the early eighteenth century that feature motifs similar to those on this bedcover—gave embroiderers license to play with realities of scale, of East and West, of animals actual and mythological.

Cora donated this bedcover in memory of textile scholar Jean Mailey, who worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Textile Study Room from 1959 to 1985. I write this in memory of Cora, whose observant eye and knowing passion for textiles enrich many museum collections today.

Donna Ghelerter is a textile and fashion historian in New York. In 2017, she published Marguerita Mergentime: American Textiles, Modern Ideas, which highlights Mergentime’s life and career as a textile designer in the 1930s.

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Sep
4
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Costumes Normands

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Author: Michele Majer

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This roller-printed furnishing cotton dating about 1827 and depicting young women in “costumes normands” illustrates several aspects of early nineteenth-century French textile production including technique, material, and source of inspiration.

The mechanical innovation of printing on cotton with engraved copper rollers was perfected by the British in the early 1780s and brought to France in 1797 by Christopher Oberkampf, the founder of the renowned printed cotton manufactory in Jouy, outside Paris. Over the next decade, machines were installed in other centers of cotton production including Mulhouse and Nantes. Compared to plate printing that had been in use since the mid-eighteenth century, roller printing was considerably faster, allowing for a significantly larger output in the same amount of time. This, in turn, reduced the costs of and expanded the market for these fabrics that were sought after by middle- and working-class consumers, eager for the latest novelties.

In the second half of the eighteenth century, French manufacturers of printed cottons relied heavily on foreign imports, primarily from Britain and India. However, by the second decade of the nineteenth century, French spinners and weavers were making dress and furnishing cottons in a wider range of qualities and greater quantities than previously. By the mid-1820s, the abundance of domestically produced cottons also contributed to the dramatic increase in consumption and lower prices of this commodity.

Both to entice consumers and in response to their demand, manufacturers offered new designs on a frequent basis. As producers of plate-printed cottons had done in the eighteenth century, firms in the early nineteenth century often drew on engraved sources for inspiration. Historical, biblical, allegorical, mythological, and exotic subjects; scenes from novels, plays, and operas; and genre scenes were all highly popular for furnishing cottons during this period.

Many of the figures in this cotton from the Cooper Hewitt collection derive from an 1827 publication, Costumes des femmes du pays de Caux et de plusieurs autres parties de l’ancienne province de Normandie, that attests to the growing interest in regional traditional dress during the Romantic period. The 105 individual figures in the plates were drawn by the well-known painter and illustrator, Louis-Marie Lanté (1789-1871), and engraved by Georges-Jacques Gatine (ca. 1773-after 1841). Lanté frequently contributed illustrations to the renowned French fashion periodical Journal des Dames et des Modes (1797-1839), that were also engraved by Gatine. In fact, apart from their distinctive, towering headdresses, the young women’s high-waisted dresses with puffed upper sleeves, applied decoration on the bodice and at the hem, and frilled collars are very similar to contemporary fashion plates. Requiring hours of washing, starching, and ironing, the forms of these elaborate headpieces identified the wearer’s town or village in the Norman province. Among Lanté’s figures selected by the cotton’s designer and placed on small islands in groups of two, four, and five are: Cauchoise (Nos. 1 and 9); Costume de Coutances (No. 26); Costume de Rollevilledessiné au Hâvre (No. 36); Costume de Rolleville (No. 37); Costume de Lisieux (No. 40); Costume de Caën (No. 43); Jeune fille de Bayeux (Nos. 49 and 52); and Costume de Saint-Valery en Caux (No. 57). The monochromatic palette (here, sepia colored) is characteristic of roller-printed cottons as is the short repeat, disguised by a dense filling pattern of stylized flowers and foliage.

 

Michele Majer is Assistant Professor at Bard Graduate Center in New York, where she teaches courses in eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century fashion and textiles. In 2012, she curated a BGC Focus Gallery exhibition, Staging Fashion, 1880-1920: Jane Hading, Lily Elsie, Billie Burke, and contributed to and edited the accompanying catalogue. She is also Research Associate at Cora Ginsburg LLC and is a regular contributor to the annual catalogues.

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Sep
3
to Sep 27

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts

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Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts

Looking across city blocks and quilt blocks, roadways and seams, one can see a visible kinship between quilt making and cartography. Both are built upon established systems that use color, pattern, and symbols to create whole compositions from a network of interlocked parts. Quilts and maps are also infused with history and memory—similarly living records of traditions, experiences, relationships, beliefs, and future aspirations. What can be gleaned from a bit of patchwork cut from a wedding dress, castoff feed sack, or commemorative flag? How are personal, political, cultural, and spiritual ideals inscribed onto a quilt’s surface, creating a network of roadways and landmarks that illustrate the quilt maker’s world and his or her place within it?

Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts is an invitation to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends.

Monday - Thursday, 11am - 5pm.

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Map Quilt, artist unidentified, possibly Virginia, 1886, silk and cotton with silk embroidery, 78 3/4 × 82 1/4 in., gift of Dr. and Mrs. C. David McLaughlin, 1987.1.1. Photo by Schecter Lee.

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Sep
3
to Sep 29

Fabrications: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

Fabrications: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

The Milliners Guild is comprised of professional hat makers from around the US. This exhibition will showcase the unique designs of 17 Guild members, each creating a hat using innovative millinery techniques and featuring beautiful textiles from premier NYC Garment District supplier B&J Fabrics. Textile categories will include laces, brocades, tweeds and prints.

The Milliners Guild is a non-profit organization committed to increasing the public profile of millinery as well as the public's awareness and interest in millinery products. Through a collective website, special events and educational seminars the Guild provides communication about this thriving and contemporary industry to the public, press and students of the craft.

Participants:

Kathy Anderson, Linda Ashton, Sally Caswell, Wanda Chambers, Ellen Colon Lugo, Rosael Torres Davis, Laura del Villaggio, Jennifer Hoertz, Lisa McFadden, Karen Morris, Evetta Petty, Lisa Shaub, Judith Solodkin, Monika Stebbins, Mergie Trembley, Barbara Volker 

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Sep
3
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Wearing Wealth

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Object Of The Day: Wearing Wealth

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Author: Sumru Belger Krody

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This robe was once adorned a high official of the court of Bukhara, an ancient city nestled in one of Central Asia’s fertile oases. Surrounded by lush orchards and fields, the city was the center of power for the Manghit dynasty’s Bukharan Khanate from 1785 until the 1920 takeover by the Soviet Union.

Centuries of political turmoil and instability in Central Asia preceding the nineteenth century created an environment that compelled people to accumulate and invest their wealth in portable items such as textiles and jewelry. Textiles were light, made with expensive materials, required costly labor to produce, and did not lose their value.

Central Asian costume in the nineteenth century consisting of layered garments made out of luxurious materials and a variety of headgear, jewelry, ornaments, and accessories, was a feast to the eyes of many travelers to the region. Each garment had myriad bright colors, was cut full, and hung loose with flowing lines. Although our contemporary eyes may consider the resulting silhouette bulky, Central Asian people wore many layers of clothing not only to protect themselves from the elements, but also to show off their wealth, and thus their importance in society. This was the accepted aesthetic of the times.

It could be argued that wearing one’s wealth was the vestige of a nomadic past still lingering among the long settled former nomadic societies. Because textiles meant wealth, they were treated with respect. They were kept in the family, recycled for generations, and when they were constructed, fabrics were minimally cut so there was no waste. This practice follows a pattern well known among many textile-producing cultures, where so much effort goes into making the cloth itself that none is wasted, so people in these societies choose to wear garments that are loosely tailored without any angling and sculpting.

The large size of the robe called chapan and straight cut under the arms indicate that it was made for a man. It is also particularly sumptuous, indicating that wearer had wealth to lavish on a garment such as this. The outer layer of the garment was composed of silk fabric embellished with metallic-wrapped silk supplementary weft yarns creating a sumptuous ogival lattice. Photographs taken in Bukhara and Samarkand in the nineteenth-century, show emirs as well as many high officials such as judges wearing this type of robe.

The lining of the robe is also luxurious ikat fabric. Ikat derives its name from the technique used to decorate fabric, wherein parts of the warp or weft yarns are tightly bound in order to resist dye penetration. The bold and colorful designs of ikat fabrics are created before the yarns are woven into cloth. The colors and design of the ikat used inside of this robe indicate that the fabrics were tailored into a robe in the second half of the nineteenth century and trimmed with silk band all along the edges of the robe.

Sumru Belger Krody is Senior Curator at George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum.

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Sep
2
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Winter’s Friend

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Object Of The Day: Winter’s Friends

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Author: Janine LeBlanc

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

For some time, I’ve been interested in Japanese textiles and the messages they can convey. In a culture where everyone wore essentially the same T-shaped garment, the difference was in the details: color, materials, motifs, as well as their combinations. Each have specific meaning.

This late Edo era (circa 1800) garment is a kosode or small sleeve-opening kimono. It’s meant to be worn as an outer robe over a formal kimono without the use of an obi or sash. Its red lining is rolled outward over a padded hem, which adds weight and allows the kosode to drape onto the floor like a train. The arrangement of motifs follows the open edges of the kosode, placed along the hem and center front, with a symmetry that is associated with late Edo kimono.

The base fabric is a satin damask weave called rinzu. The basket-woven motif is interrupted by a repeat pattern of cranes and turtles, the geometry contrasting with the organic shapes. The crane and the turtle are both considered symbols of longevity.

This kosode is embroidered with silk floss in a satin stitch and couch-stitched with gold-wrapped thread. The imagery is a combination of plum blossoms, willow and pine motifs called “the three friends of winter.” Plum blossoms bloom in early spring, even in the snow. Willows bend in the wind. The pine tree is always green and will grow on difficult terrain. Together they represent steadfastness, flexibility and tenacity. The kosode is also embroidered with red-crowned cranes, which mate for life and are considered an auspicious motif for marriage.

This kosode also has five kamon, or crests, in a traditional arrangement at chest, center back and center of sleeves; kimonos with five crests are considered the most formal. Kamon were originally created as a way to distinguish Samurai warriors on the battlefield and have become a way of identifying family. The circular crest is also embroidered with gold-wrapped thread. It depicts the swallowtail butterfly used by the Taira family.

This kosode with its red padded hem and auspicious motifs of the crane and three friends of winter can be viewed as a precursor to the contemporary wedding uchikake. All of these elements are still used on formal wedding kimono today, more than 200 years later.

Janine LeBlanc works as a Collections Assistant at the Gregg Museum of Art and Design, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863)"

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Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863)

Charting the Divine Plan: The Art of Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863) explores the confluence of art, love, science, and religion in the extraordinary art of Orra White Hitchcock, one of America’s first female scientific illustrators. Her marriage in 1821 to Amherst College professor Edward Hitchcock cemented a years-long friendship and collaboration based on a bedrock of faith and science, mutual respect, close observation, and mental capacity for the largest of ideas. Orra White exhibited a prodigious scientific mind and abundant artistic talent at an early age. The exhibition traces her development from schoolgirl projects to highly accomplished renderings of the natural scenery of the Connecticut River Valley used in her husband’s many geology publications. 

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Mastodon maximus. Cuv. [After Georges Cuvier], Orra White Hitchcock (1796–1863), Amherst, Massachusetts, 1828–1840, Pen and ink and watercolor wash on cotton, with woven tape binding, 25 1/2 x 37",  Amherst College Archives & Special Collections

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

M'Afrique at Moroso Soho

M'Afrique at Moroso Soho

In an age when all is virtual, and appearance glorified, Moroso goes back to routes of tradition and handcraft with M’Afrique. Started as a social project in Dakar, Africa, in 2009, the handwoven outdoor pieces designed by international talents have become integral part of the brand’s collections. Inspired by local nature and colors, each piece can be replicated but carries the unique of the handcraft process by using traditional fishing cords to weave patterns and structures.

The Moroso showroom will display it’s M’Afrique creations in the flagship showroom located at 146 Greene Street, New York.

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Sep
1
to Sep 2

Thomas Bayrle: Playtime

Thomas Bayrle: Playtime

This solo exhibition—Bayrle’s first major New York museum survey—brings together works from the last fifty years, highlighting Bayrle’s experiments across media and their prescient commentary on the relationship between consumerism, technology, propaganda, and desire.

One of the most important artists to have emerged during the 1960s West German economic boom, Bayrle has received belated recognition for his influential works and processes. Long before the advent of current visual technologies, he foresaw our digital reality, employing photocopy machines and other midcentury tools in his early works to create analog visualizations of what are now fundamental traits of our digital culture. Bayrle’s thematic investigations have ranged from a visual analysis of mass culture and consumerism to reflections on the intersection of technology with global politics.

The exhibition highlights how the artist has expanded his serial patterns beyond traditional artworks into textiles, wallpaper, carpeting, and garments.

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iPhone Pietà, 2017 Silk, linen, cotton, and natural viscose Tapestry by Atelier Patrick Guillot, Aubusson 98 1/2 x 98 1/2 in (250 x 250 cm) Produced in cooperation with MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art, Vienna Courtesy the artist

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu

Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu

For millennia, ancient peoples of the Andes created quipus—complex record-keeping devices, made of knotted cords, that served as an essential medium for reading and writing, registering and remembering. New York–based Chilean artist and poet Cecilia Vicuña has devoted a significant part of her artistic practice to studying, interpreting, and reactivating the quipus, which were banned by the Spanish during their colonization of South America. Drawing on her indigenous heritage, Vicuña channels this ancient, sensorial mode of communication into immersive installations and participatory performances.

Disappeared Quipu pairs ancient quipus from our collection with a newly commissioned installation by Vicuña that combines monumental strands of knotted wool with a four-channel video projection. Together, these quipus of the past and present explore the nature of language and memory, the resilience of native people in the face of colonial repression, and Vicuña’s own experiences living in exile from her native Chile. Each knot of Vicuña’s modern-day quipus gives radical possibility to the connective and expressive capacities of a language nearly lost to history.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Object Of The Day: Palpable Colo

Object Of The Day: Palpable Color

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Author: Janice Lessman-Moss

In celebration of the second annual New York Textile Month, members of the Textile Society of America will author Object of the Day for the month of September. A non-profit professional organization of scholars, educators, and artists in the field of textiles, TSA provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of information about textiles worldwide.

This stunning textile represents a successful integration of the handweaver’s sensibility with the power and versatility of electronic jacquard technology. It was created by Patricia Kinsella in 1991 when she was a member of the Muller Zell Jacquard Project, an opportunity for invited weavers to explore and develop work in an industrial setting with the support of the Muller Zell textile company in Germany.

The weaving presents a dramatic composition activated by columnar shapes with jagged contours, that establish an interesting interplay of figure and ground. The relatively flat dark shadowy forms, containing subtle shifts of dark blue hue in a weft dominant twill, contrast with the bright warmth of the summery sunset colors of the patterned ground. Some of the horizontal stripes, anchor the composition with a tactile and visual solidity echoing architectural divisions/appointments like window panes, while other stripes blend softly with one another in an atmospheric glow. By contrast, the vertical stripes of the warp appear fragmented as they define the surface of the randomly placed diagonally oriented organic figures that resemble gestural brush strokes. The squiggly raised lines that appear in these directional shapes of warp dominant satin, are determined by a dominant weft weave structure that adds an interesting textural detail and quality of connection with the ground plane. The warp stripes appear in faint echoes throughout the entire field in a beautiful example of optical color blending.

While the color is clearly the main player in the composition, the selection of weave structures beautifully emphasizes the physicality of the plane. The relief surface provides a haptic enticement to the graphic appeal of the design. Satins produce a slightly raised reflective surface, while the twills enliven the ground and the columns with directional movement, exhibiting the regularly spaced diagonal repetition that is a foil to the various angles, and curvilinear edges which define the shapes. The horizontal and vertical stripes, visually weave in and out of space and provide a macrocosmic reiteration of the microcosmic grid of the warp and weft axes.

Kinsella had previously been immersed in the creation of unique complex hand weavings that contained a similar vocabulary of marks, patterns, colors and textures. They were rich in spatial and associative intrigue, referencing maps and fractals while emphasizing the axes of weaving through selective gradations of color in both the warp and weft. The color play juxtaposed smooth and abrupt relationships throughout the field causing the ground shapes or patterns to recede and advance in unexpected passages throughout the composition.

When invited to participate in the Muller Zell project that allowed her to create this weaving in the Cooper Hewitt collection, she had to switch gears and recalled the challenge of the experience to me in our recent email conversation. Because her hand woven pieces were all singular conceptual objects, she wanted this jacquard textile to retain some of that unique character by avoiding a strongly defined repeat. She was able to create a design with a very large repeat that it is difficult to discern at first glance. Primarily she was interested in maintaining the “palpable physicality of color” that characterized her handwoven work. To this end, she did some sampling on her hand loom with yarns of her own choosing to explore color, texture and structural/weave options. She then had Muller Zell wind a special warp for her weavings that contained multiple warp stripes arranged to her specifications. In the weft, she used the maximum rotation of colors capable of being handled by the electronic loom – even having yarns plied specially for her to obtain the blending of color that was essential to her design. Kinsella was pleased with the results and I too find them beautiful and effective!

Janice Lessman-Moss is a weaver and professor of textiles in the School of Art at Kent State University.

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Sep
1
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The Secret Life of Textiles: The Milton Sonday Archive

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The Secret Life of Textiles: The Milton Sonday Archive

Textile scholar Milton Sonday is one of the world's foremost authorities on the structures of handmade fabrics, particularly woven textiles and lace. Hired in 1962 by the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., as a draftsman for a project on Precolumbian ceramics, he was promoted shortly thereafter to assistant curator responsible for carpets. In 1967, he joined the curatorial staff of the Cooper Hewitt Museum. Early in his career, Sonday began to put his artistic skills to use in creating legible and visually pleasing technical drawings that express the weaves of patterned textiles. He went on to teach seminars on fabric analysis, developing various methods that enabled students (even those who claimed they "couldn't draw") to re-create and therefore understand the structures of historical textiles.

This installation includes a selection of Sonday's studies of lace structures and couched embroidery, loom models for patterned weaves, and diagrams made from classic handwoven textiles. His clear, comprehensible, and attractive drawings and models have become more than didactic tools. The wit and imagination evident in Sonday's choices of materials and colors and the skill with which the works are made has inspired delight and appreciation over the years.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care

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Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care

Los Angeles–based artist and designer Tanya Aguiñiga has established herself as a crucial voice working at the intersection of fiber art, design, social practice, and activism. Her work, ranging from her “Performance Crafting” series—which uses craft to generate dialogues about identity, culture, and gender—to furniture whose material and form reimagine its functionality to provide “support,” shows a commitment to design thinking as political. At the heart of her practice is an inquiry into how community is created, and the role that craft, design, and materiality play in its formation.

Founded by Aguiñiga and launched in 2015, AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides) is a long-term initiative that activates sites along the US–Mexico border through collaborative art-making and storytelling projects. Started as a month-long activation at the San Ysidro border crossing in Tijuana, it has evolved its focus to record and paint a picture of life along the length of the border. To date, AMBOS, in collaboration with artists and community organizations working with border issues/themes, has produced programs along the border between the United States and Mexico, stopping at thirteen US/Mexico ports of entry, and crossing a total of forty times. 

Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care will be on view in the second-floor gallery.

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Installation view of 'Tanya Aguiñiga: Craft & Care'  
Photo by Jenna Bascom
Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

History Refused to Die

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History Refused to Die

This exhibition presents thirty paintings, sculptures, drawings, and quilts by self-taught contemporary African American artists to celebrate the 2014 gift to The Metropolitan Museum of Art of works of art from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. The artists represented by this generous donation all hail from the American South.

History Refused to Die features the mixed-media art of Thornton Dial (1928–2016)—whose monumental assemblage from 2004 provides the exhibition's title—and a selection of the renowned quilts from Gee's Bend, Alabama, by quilters such as Annie Mae Young (1928–2012), Lucy Mingo (born 1931), Loretta Pettway (born 1942), and additional members of the extended Pettway family. Among other accomplished artists to be featured are Nellie Mae Rowe (1900–1982), Lonnie Holley (born 1950), and Ronald Lockett (1965–1988).

Remarkably diverse in media and technique, the works in this exhibition nonetheless suggest their makers' cultural and aesthetic kinship through the use of found and repurposed materials. Their subjects are likewise varied, rooted in personal history and experience, regional identity—particularly common legacies of slavery and post-Reconstruction histories of oppression under the Black Codes and Jim Crow laws—in addition to national and international events.

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Housetop and Bricklayer with Bars quilt Lucy T. Pettway (American, Boykin, Alabama 1921–2004 Boykin, Alabama)

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Sep
1
to Sep 9

Tony Vaccaro's iconic Marimekko photography from 1964

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Tony Vaccaro's iconic Marimekko photography from 1964

On show at Marimekko's NYC flagship store August 13th - September 9th 2018

Photographer Tony Vaccaro (born in 1922) has captured a broad range of our world during his almost 80-year career. He is best known for his photos taken in Europe in the 1940s. Later, he became a renowned fashion and lifestyle photographer. 

Tony Vaccaro has photographed kings and queens, presidents and popes, writers and actors, artists and scientists. In 1964, LIFE magazine sent him to Finland - to Marimekko.

This photoshoot gave us one of the most iconic sets of Marimekko photography, which today acts as an enchanting visit to the joyous and colourful 1960s, the origin of Marimekko. One of the models, Anja, was to become Tony Vaccaro's wife. What a story!

Please join at our flagship store to view in person.

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Sep
1
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Infinity of Nations Exhibition

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Infinity of Nations Exhibition

This spectacular, permanent exhibition of some 700 works of Native art from throughout North, Central, and South America demonstrates the breadth of the museum's renowned collection and highlights the historic importance of many of these iconic objects, including dozens of textile works.

Chosen to illustrate the geographic and chronological scope of the museum's collection, Infinity of Nations opens with a display of headdresses. Signifying the sovereignty of Native nations, these works include a magnificent Kayapó krok-krok-ti, a macaw-and-heron-feather ceremonial headdress.

Focal-point objects, representing each region, include an Apsáalooke (Crow) robe illustrated with warriors' exploits; a detailed Mayan limestone bas relief depicting a ball player; an elaborately beaded Inuit tuilli, or woman's inner parka, made for the mother of a newborn baby; a Mapuche kultrung, or hand drum, depicting the cosmos; a carved and painted chief's headdress, depicting a killer whale with a raven emerging from its back, created and worn by Willie Seaweed (Kwakwaka'wakw); an anthropomorphic Shipibo joni chomo, or water vessel from Peru; a Chumash basket decorated with a Spanish-coin motif; an ancient mortar from Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M.; a gourd carved with a detailed picture of the Battle of Arica by Mariano Flores Kananga (Quechua); and an early Anishinaabe man's outfit complete with headdress, leggings, shirt, sash, and jewelry. The exhibition concludes with works by Native artists including Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache) and Rick Bartow (Mad River Wiyot).

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