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Apr
12
to Jul 12

Nature By Design

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Nature By Design: Selections From The Permanent Collection

To accompany the special exhibition Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, Nature by Design presents nine distinct stories drawn from Cooper Hewitt’s collection of over 210,000 design objects. Throughout history, designers have observed nature, investigated its materials, and imitated and abstracted its patterns and shapes. Textiles, jewelry, furniture, cutlery, and more show how designers have interpreted nature’s rich beauty and astonishing complexity. Across scales from microscopic to monumental, and in forms familiar and unusual, we invite visitors to discover how nature and design have intersected in the past and continue to converge in our world.

Katagami — March 30–oct. 27

This exhibition highlights the traditional Japanese craft of katagami: paper stencils carved by master artisans for use in decorating textiles. These stencils often take nature as their subject, and are made from natural materials. Cooper Hewitt’s collection of katagami mostly dates to the late Edo (1603-1868) and Meiji (1868-1912) eras, when the craft was at its height. The works on view demonstrate a range of styles and cutting techniques, reflecting the great expressive potential of the medium.

To create the stencils, pounded mulberry bark is treated with fermented persimmon juice, resulting in a paper that is strong, flexible, and waterproof. Once the paper has been cut, thin silk threads are sometimes added in order to reinforce the design. These treatments are necessary because, since at least the 16th century, katagami have been employed in a dyeing technique called katazome. In this method, a highly-skilled dyer places the paper stencil over prepared fabric and applies a dye-resistant rice paste (or “resist”) through the stencil. This process is then repeated along the fabric’s length, creating an unbroken pattern. Later, when the fabric is dyed—usually with natural indigo—the areas protected by the resist remain untouched by the color. Finally, when the resist is washed away, the finished textile retains the stencil’s design.

Embroidered And Embellished — March 30–Oct. 27

A fanciful, romantic, and stylized interpretation of nature embellished men’s waistcoats in 18th-century France.  Realistic and exaggerated flowers were the preferred form of decoration and displayed the exceptional skills of France’s embroidery professionals, who employed a painterly approach that required a sophisticated color sense and delicate rendering of light and shadow to amplify the brightness of the florals. A majority of the superb waistcoats and samples in this gallery were bequeathed to Cooper Hewitt by  Richard C. Greenleaf, who in the early 20th century assembled one of the most important collections of European textiles and lace in the United States. The waistcoats, along with embroidery samples and their related designs on paper, illustrate the exquisite artistry and incomparable craftsmanship that made French design the standard for men’s dress across the royal courts of Europe.

Among the most fashionable piece of clothing for a gentleman of the ancien régime, a white silk waistcoat was the perfect canvas for displaying elaborately designed floral frameworks. To set the fashion, a gentleman needed dozens, if not hundreds, of waistcoats festooned not only with beautiful flowers, but clever references that sparked conversation. Faced with a growing demand for novelty, embroidery designers began adding animals, insects, romantic vistas, and even cultural and historical references to heighten the whimsy and topicality of their waistcoat designs. Close examination reveals the gold and silver thread, sequins, seed pearls, faceted glass, and paste beads that elevated men’s clothing to a height of elegance and intricacy rarely seen since.


Paisley — April 12–Nov. 11

Design’s tear-drop shaped motif popularly known as paisley has persisted, and its timeline of design variations reflect a diversity of natural forms. Everything from a flowering plant with its roots attached to a slender cypress tree with bent tip to a serpentine and elongated scroll have been stylized and expressed in paisley’s ornamental grammar. It is a design that for centuries has evolved with the fashion and interior styles of cultures around the world, with a complex history revealing an amalgamation of influences from Persia, India, and Europe. Integrally tied to the shawls handwoven in Kashmir during the 18th and 19th centuries, paisley derives its name from the Scottish town that became famous for producing imitation Kashmir shawls in the 19th century. Often infilled with flowers, more paisleys, and even jewels, the motif is constantly revisited by designers as we see in this display of over 80 objects from the collection—many shown for the first time. Designers, such as Etro, Zandra Rhodes, and Maharam are drawn to this timeless shape and its inherent vitality. And perhaps the secret to paisley’s immortality is the way its traditions have been adapted to combine conformity with the spirit of a wild child.

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May
20
to Apr 20

Frank Lloyd Wright Textiles: The Taliesin Line, 1955–60

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Frank Lloyd Wright Textiles: The Taliesin Line, 1955–60

In 1955, the renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) launched the first commercial venture of his long and eminent career, designing a line of affordable home products for the general consumer. The designs for the fabrics and wallpapers, based on Wright’s architectural vocabulary and inspired by specific buildings, were featured in a sample book, Schumacher's Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpapers Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright  (1955). Only 100 copies of the sample book were printed and were available exclusively to authorized dealers.

This installation presents the book and nine examples of the fabric it introduced, all from the original line produced by F. Schumacher and Co. In addition to the textiles that reflect the signature Wright aesthetic, the installation also includes two examples of Wright-designed wooden vases that were made in a very limited number and never reached the open market, and a 1954 photograph of the architect by Yosuf Karsh.

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Jun
10
to Jan 20

Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

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Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

Designers are forging meaningful connections with nature, inspired by its properties and resources. Their collaborative processes—working with nature and in teams across multiple disciplines—are optimistic responses at this moment when humans contend with the complexities and conditions of our planet. Compelled by a sense of urgency, designers look to nature as a guide and partner.

With projects ranging from experimental prototypes to consumer products, immersive installations, and architectural constructions, Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, co-organized with Cube design museum, presents the work of sixty-two international design teams. Collaborations involve scientists, engineers, advocates for social and environmental justice, artists, and philosophers. They are engaging with nature in innovative and ground-breaking ways, driven by a profound awareness of climate change and ecological crises as much as advances in science and technology.

The exhibition themes explore seven strategies that designers are using to collaborate with nature—to understand, remediate, simulate, salvage, nurture, augment, and facilitate. The outcomes are speculative or practical and reveal new materials, creative methods, and inventive technologies. These provocations and solutions put forth by today’s extraordinary design teams serve as encouragement for an enduring and more respectful partnership with nature.

Curatorial teams from both museums developed the exhibition content, including Cooper Hewitt’s Caitlin Condell, associate curator and head of Drawings, Prints & Graphic Design; Andrea Lipps, associate curator of contemporary design; Matilda McQuaid, deputy director of curatorial and head of Textiles; and Caroline O’Connell, curatorial assistant; and Cube’s Gene Bertrand, program and development director; and Hans Gubbels, director of Cube.

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Aug
8
to Jan 26

Vera Paints a Scarf

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Vera Paints a Scarf

Vera Paints a Scarf celebrates the work of artist Vera Neumann (1907-1993) and her contributions to the field of American design. Neumann was among the most successful female design entrepreneurs of the 20th century, and an originator of the American lifestyle brand. Over the course of her career, which spanned from her label’s debut in 1942 to her death in 1993, Neumann produced an iconic line of women's scarves all signed with a cursive “Vera” and stamped with a ladybug, as well as thousands of textile patterns based on her drawings, paintings, and collages. This exhibition will be the first to comprehensively examine her career—and highlights the keys to her success: her joyful and inventive aesthetic, democratic design ethos, fusion of craft and mass production, and clever marketing.

Telling the story of the artist behind the Vera brand, Vera Paints a Scarf  will offer a selection of paintings produced in Neumann’s preferred technique, Japanese sumi-e (ink painting), from which her textile designs derive. The exhibition will then continue with a broad exploration of her design work through over two hundred objects from her lines for the home and women’s fashion produced between 1950 and 1980, including original works on paper, textiles and garments, archival photographs and video, as well as the ephemera related to the company’s marketing campaigns, which ingeniously used the tagline “Vera paints” to promote her mass-market label.

Vera Paints a Scarf: The Art and Design of Vera Neumann is curated by Elissa Auther, MAD’s Windgate Research and Collections Curator with the support of Curatorial Assistant Alida Jekabson. Additional support was provided by Rachael Schwabe and George Tiger Liu.

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Sep
5
to Nov 27

Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive

FMoteau & Deminiere (France), 19th c. Sketch reference page Collaged Gouache and ink paintings on paper

FMoteau & Deminiere (France), 19th c. Sketch reference page Collaged Gouache and ink paintings on paper

Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive

 Kravet Inc. is known for its comprehensive archive of textile design, which documents the history of textile manufacture dating back centuries and originating from cultures across the globe. Encompassing textiles, paintings, artifacts and other historic documents, the Kravet archive is an important resource for researchers, designers and historians. For the first time, the Kravet Archive is the subject of an exhibition that presents its history and complexity for designers, design enthusiasts and visitors new to the subject alike to enjoy. More than 80 examples from this vast repository of textile design history are on view as part of Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive at the NYSID Gallery. 

“It is so exciting to share all of the wonderful treasures collected over the years with the design community,” said Ellen Kravet, Chairman, Board of Trustees, NYSID. “The New York School of Interior Design is the perfect organization to partner with on this endeavor offering an exclusive glimpse into the rich history of the textile world. We hope these incredible materials serve as a source of inspiration for the next generation of interior designers.” 

The Kravet archive, located at Kravet Inc.’s corporate headquarters in Bethpage, Long Island, is incredibly diverse—the oldest object is a Coptic textile fragment dating from 200 BC, but it also includes contemporary pieces such as recent indigo-dyed fabrics from Japan. It is drawn from around the world, with textiles originating on six continents and encompassing historical and contemporary production techniques. 

About The New York School of Interior Design 

New York School of Interior Design is a private, nonprofit college focused exclusively on interior design. The college offers certificate, undergraduate, and graduate programs for students at all stages of their careers—whether they’re just becoming familiar with the discipline, considering a career change, or looking to deepen knowledge in a particular area. Consistently ranked one of the top interior design programs in the United States, students study both residential and commercial interior design, some with specialties in sustainable design, lighting, and healthcare interiors. NYSID students enjoy a small class size and sharp focus, a great deal of personal attention from dedicated faculty, and they go on to practice at the highest levels of the profession. To learn more, visit NYSID.edu. 

About Kravet Inc. 

Kravet Inc., established in 1918, is the industry leader in to-the-trade home furnishings. This fifth generation family business distributes fabrics, furniture, wall coverings, trimmings, carpets and accessories. The family's commitment to innovation has helped the company transform from a small fabric house to a global leader, representing brands and designers from all over the world. In 2015, Kravet Inc. introduced curatedkravet.com, a to-the-trade only e-commerce site offering designers unique furniture and accessories curated from around the globe. Kravet Inc. owns Kravet, Lee Jofa, Groundworks, GP & J Baker and Brunschwig & Fils, all high-end fabric houses that specialize in style, luxury and exceptional design. With locations in North America and worldwide, Kravet Inc. offers the highest level of customer service, quality products and web technology for today's design professional. For further brand information, please refer to kravet.com. 

For more information or questions please email rsvp@nysid.edu or call 212-472-1500, ext. 405

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Sep
12
to Feb 23

The World of Anna Sui

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The World of Anna Sui

Born and raised in Detroit, educated and discovered in New York, Anna Sui reinvented pop culture fashion with her signature rock-and-roll romantic label in the 1990s and has remained a design icon ever since. Beginning with her premiere catwalk show in 1991, Sui has shaped not only the garments, textiles, accessories, cosmetics, and interiors that comprise her design universe, but also the course of fashion history by popularizing the boutique fashion look. Sui’s unique approach to creating narratives through her work is legendary: a self-taught historian of culture, art, and fashion, she samples music, books, exhibitions, movies, time periods, photography, and art movements in her designs.

Over the years, Sui has explored wide-ranging materials and inspirations, including papier-mâché mannequin heads; linens by Vera; Claire McCardell sportswear; army surplus jackets; Japanese hankies; qipao dresses; wood-soled platforms from Goody Two-Shoes; the style of Jane Holzer, Zandra Rhodes, and Anita Pallenberg; and Minnie Mouse. Her collections are replete with references, processed and creatively reimagined through the filter of Anna Sui.

Unlike other popular American designers, Sui is driven by telling stories head-to-toe about the worlds of cowgirls, grunge girls, hippie chicks, hula girls, Mods, pirate rock stars, Pre-Raphaelite maidens, and surfer nomads. The exhibition gives insights into her process, allowing the viewer to step inside her imagination and watch it unfold.

The World of Anna Sui features approximately one-hundred looks from the designer’s archive, presenting a roll call of twelve archetypes that are staples of the Sui aesthetic. It also spotlights her heroes as a youth and the importance of her collaborators, including the New York City Garment Center.

The first iteration of this exhibition debuted at the Fashion and Textile Museum, London, in the summer of 2017.

The World of Anna Sui was curated by Dennis Nothdruft for the Fashion and Textile Museum, London. It was secured for the Museum of Arts and Design by former William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator Shannon R. Stratton and adapted for the New York audience by Assistant Curator Barbara Paris Gifford.

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Sep
12
to Nov 1

Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures

Vagrancies Rules (detail) , 2019, Mixed media, 74 x 158 x 3 in. courtesy of Geary & the artist

Vagrancies Rules (detail), 2019, Mixed media, 74 x 158 x 3 in. courtesy of Geary & the artist

Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures

Geary is pleased to present Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures. Woods is showing works on paper for the first time and Vagrancies Rules, a 13’ long free-standing textile, is reconfigured in response to the architectural elements of the gallery. The small weavings in the series, of or related to, are made on a rudimentary portable loom.  Felt Around Federal Standard 33538 is a large scale felted wool installation that makes specific use of Geary’s windowed view of a highly regulated public space to consider color, the history and properties of felt, and the standardization of the movement of bodies.

Kristine Woods (1964 Chicago) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Recent shows include Such Is, a solo exhibition curated by Janice Guy at MBnb, NYC, New York (2019), Regarding & Regardless, a solo exhibition at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (2018), and The Portrait is Political, a group exhibition curated by Liz Collins at BRIC, Brooklyn, New York (2019). Woods spent the fall of 2018 in residency at Textilsetur Islands (Blonduos, Iceland), and is a recipient of a Creative Capital Artists Grant. Kristine Woods earned an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is full time faculty at The Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work will be included in a two-person presentation by Geary in NADA’s inaugural Chicago Invitational. This is Woods’ first solo exhibition at the gallery.

On view September 12-November 1, Open hours Tuesday through Saturday, 11-6, and by appointment

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Sep
17
to Sep 26

Special Exhibit: HBF Textiles + Elodie Blanchard

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Special Exhibit: HBF Textiles + Elodie Blanchard

HBF Textiles and designer Elodie Blanchard will present a special exhibit of Blanchard's unique textile art opening night Wednesday, September 25 from 5:30-8:00 at the HBF& HBF Textiles showroom. Blanchard began designing clothes and organizing fashion shows in her teens before moving to Paris to study sculpture at the École des Beaux-Arts and fashion at the Duperré School of Design and Fashion. In 1999, she won the young designer prize at the International Fashion Arts Festival of Hyeres, which gave her the opportunity to sell her eponymous clothing line at the famed French La Redoute store. After studying at CalArts in Los Angeles, her interests expanded to performance projects, including collaborations with musicians and dancers. Later, Blanchard delved into a variety of endeavors including prototype product development, trend forecasting, special event design, and costume and set design. She has also taught at Parsons in NY. She is the founder of Elodie Blanchard Studio specializing in textile design and fabrication. Her aesthetic is modern and whimsical: each unique piece showcases her ability to take everyday objects - an heirloom quilt, a utilitarian moving blanket, a favorite pair of pants - and transform them into extraordinary textiles with diverse design applications.


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Sep
16
to Sep 20

Material ConneXion Opens To The Public

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Material ConneXion Opens To The Public

Leading Materials-Driven Platform Announces Partnership with New York Textile Month in honor of this September’s festival. Material ConneXion, the leading materials-driven resource and partner to the most innovative brands in the world will open their library headquarters to the public for a week of self-guided tours and exciting material inspiration.

Located at the heart of Midtown, the New York library is home to over 2,000 physical material and process samples from around the world. Otherwise accessible only to Material ConneXion members, the library will host several visitors during the week of September 16th -20th 2019.

Material ConneXion’s partnership with New York Textile Month marks the first occasion where the library will be open to the public. Material ConneXion (materialconnexion.com), a SANDOW company, is a global materials and innovation platform that connects clients with over 10,000 materials and technologies to help create the products and services of tomorrow. Material ConneXion is the trusted advisor to Fortune 500 companies, as well as forward thinking agencies and government entities. With locations in Bangkok, Bilbao, Daegu, Milan, New York, Skövde, Tokyo, and North Carolina, Material ConneXion’s international network of specialists provides a global, cross industry perspective on materials, design, new product development, sustainability, and innovation.

To reserve a date at the library, or to learn more, visit Materialconnexion.com

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Sep
15
to Sep 30

The Gold Coast Arts Center Is Proud To Present Our September Exhibition: Warp & Woof

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The Gold Coast Arts Center Is Proud To Present Our September Exhibition: Warp & Woof, Curated By Gallery Director, Jude Amsel

Taking its title from the weaving terms “warp” (the vertical and static component of the weave) and “woof” (the dynamic and horizontal aspect of the weave), this exhibition looks at both conventional and unconventional approaches to weaving.

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Sep
11
to Sep 23

Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

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Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

Lost/Found is the culminating exhibition of the 10th cycle of the Textile Arts Center's Artists in Residence (TAC-AIR) , on view from 12-24 September 2019 in the TAC Project Space at the Textile Arts Center.

We are living through wild times. When there’s so much being lost, our personal becomes political, and political becomes personal.

In “Lost/Found”, a large scale tapestry tells a story of the stranglehold of addiction; the tailored shirt is enlarged, warped, and dismantled, commenting on gender normativity and patriarchal oppression; used garments gain new identities in the form of painterly compositions. An installation of prints playfully explores the idea of “cuteness” and its relation with consumption in a post-internet society; body-centric modular fabric structures propose new solutions for intimacy in domestic spaces. Flesh like knitted forms hang heavily in tension reminding us of the emotional and political challenges women still face in the context of an unwanted pregnancy. A collection of hand knitted and woven works inspired by textile traditions, motherhood and inherited legacies provides a vision of intergenerational dialogue and collaboration. A dinner party table setting incites revolution.

The work featured in Lost/Found results of nine months of questioning and reflection, throughout which the eight artists used textiles to voice their truth, reconnect with their collective history and, collaboratively, find new narratives of empowerment.

Artists in “Lost/Found” are Romina Chuls, Dance Doyle, Familien Iglesias, Tiantian Lou, Erin Palumbo, Noah Pica, Winnie van der Rijn and Shihui Zhou.

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Sep
7
to Sep 30

M.PATMOS hosting Molly Haynes

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Please join in welcoming artist, Molly Haynes, as the premiere fall artist at the M.PATMOS space in Boerum Hill. Molly Haynes is a Brooklyn-based textile artist pursuing weaving as a form of sculpture through a language of controlled yet expressive materials.

She experiments within the restrictions of a loom to weave layered compositions which, when hung on the walls or in space, reflect a sense of awe one may feel when witnessing natural phenomena intersecting with the built environment.

Hefty materials, oftentimes humble and unexpected, dictate the final form of each piece. Sisal twine, salvaged marine rope, cotton clothes line, and mill-end wools make for enlivened surfaces, yet abide by the strict control of the weave structure and austere color palette. The material becomes a physical marker of place and time.

Each weft is manually inserted row by row on a warp of carefully organized threads. After weaving, certain materials such as the sisal twine distort and curve as they absorb moisture in the air, resulting in an undulating form which does not want to be tamed into a flat wall hanging. Through embracing the materials’ difficult nature, the piece gains a spirit of its own. The sisal is oftentimes untwisted to reveal the inner character of the plant fiber, resulting in a burst of fringe. Such bursts and distortions activate space in the same way marsh grasses blow in the wind or the burl of a tree might grow through a fence. We are constantly observing sublime acts of natural force—large and small. The weavings become controlled landscapes which embody the sensory events.

Sustainable modular design, eco-friendly solutions.

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Sep
7
to Sep 28

MAD’s Artist Studios : Paolo Arao

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MAD’s Artist Studios : Paolo Arao

Paolo Arao explores the queering of geometric abstraction through sewn paintings, fabric collage, and textile constructions. Using secondhand clothing, hand-dyed fabrics, and used canvas drop cloths, Arao creates compositions of bold color and repeated geometries that disrupt perceived symmetries and ask audiences to reconsider their expectations of what queerness looks like. At MAD, Arao will create a series of multi-dimensional works that are intimate in scale.

Arao has presented solo exhibitions at Glass Box, Western Exhibitions, Barney Savage Gallery, Franklin Artworks, and Jeff Bailey Gallery. Arao is a recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship and received his BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Visit Paolo in MAD’s Artist Studios on Saturdays, 10 am–5 pm.

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Sep
7
to Sep 28

MAD’s Artist Studios : Max Colby

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MAD’s Artist Studios : Max Colby

Max Colby creates maximal works of textiles, embroidery, and painting that examine social themes through a queer lens. Their series of intricate embroideries and textile assemblages subvert craft forms and techniques traditionally tied to domestic, religious, and ceremonial settings. At MAD, Colby will further develop a new series that considers trans and non-binary identity and is inspired by funeral wreaths and ceremonial altarpieces.

Colby has exhibited at the International Print Center, TEMP Gallery, Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education, and the Danforth Museum of Art. They were awarded the Queer Artists’ Fellowship at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art and a residency at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in 2018. They received their BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Tufts University.

Visit Max in MAD’s Artist Studios on Wednesdays, 10am–5pm.

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Sep
7
to Sep 28

MAD’s Artist Studios : Anthony Akinbola

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MAD’s Artist Studios : Anthony Akinbola

The Museum of Arts and Design has selected Anthony Akinbola as its eighth MAD Artist Fellow. Created in 2016, the fellowship is dedicated to promoting emerging artists from historically underrepresented communities. MAD Fellows work on site fulltime in a dedicated studio space and receive a solo exhibition at the Museum at the end of their fellowship.

A first-generation American of Nigerian origin, Anthony Akinbola’s layered and multifaceted compositions celebrate and reconcile the cultures that compose his identity. At MAD, Akinbola will continue his exploration of the use of durags—fiber scarves used in the maintenance of black hair—as both a material for art-making and a commentary on larger issues of identity, respectability, and commodification of African American culture.

In 2018, Akinbola created a monumental wall collage for the Queens Museum and his work has been included in group exhibitions at Denny Dimin Gallery, New Image Art Gallery, Bronx River Art Center, Miranda Kuo Gallery, and The Verbeke Foundation in Belgium. Akinbola received a BA in communications and media from SUNY Purchase College.

Visit Anthony in MAD’s Artist Studios on Wednesdays 3–6 pm, Thursdays 5–9 pm, Fridays 3–5 pm, and Saturdays 12–6 pm.

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Sep
7
to Sep 28

MAD’s Artist Studios : Amanda Thackray

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MAD’s Artist Studios : Amanda Thackray

Amanda Thackray creates her own netting, cording, and paper rope using methods adapted from the traditional Korean handmade paper process of hanji to build installations and sculpture meant to evoke the muscles, membranes, and other tissues of the human body. At MAD, Thackray will introduce color and texture to her paper rope pieces using Japanese suminagashi marbling and printmaking methods.

Thackray teaches at SUNY Purchase College and Rutgers University. Trained in traditional and contemporary printmaking methods, her work ranges from installation and sculpture to cast glass multiples, artists’ books, drawings, and mixed media works on paper. Thackray received an MFA in printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design and a BFA in printmaking and painting from Rutgers University.

Visit Amanda in MAD’s Artist Studios on Fridays, 10am–5pm.

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Sep
6
to Sep 25

String Yarns: Rowan MODE Handknit Collection Trunk show

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String Yarns: Rowan MODE Handknit Collection Trunk show 

MODE is a new concept collection by Rowan focusing on contemporary, wearable handknits in chic shades. As a Rowan Flagship Store, String Yarns is proud to present the full line of MODE yarns and pattern books, as well as several sample garments on display, all leading up to an exclusive event at the end of the trunk show

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Sep
4
to Sep 18

In process: A textile story, by Tanu Vasu

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In process: A textile story, by Tanu Vasu


Tanu Vasu explores the creation of hybrid forms which equate innovation with artisanal practice. Her work proposes altered realities of garments through arrangements of abstract textile formations, presenting an illusion of 'subversive sculpture'. 

Her design practice is built as an exploration of the fragility of textiles and a cyclical reflection to resist definition. This revealed how the intersection of technology and clothing establishes a component of elusiveness through upending conventional notions of clothing.

This installation at The Canvas depicts her process of creation merging old world techniques and hybrid notions, showcasing an innovative range of textiles and clothing comprising of saori weaving, laser cut textiles, and sustainable fabrics as a series of engaging forms.

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Sep
3
to Sep 30

A Milliner's Studio: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

  • 215 West 38th Street, New York, NY 10018 United States (map)
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A Milliner's Studio: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

To celebrate NY Textile Month, the Milliners Guild will have hats on display in the Garment Center’s 38th Street window, sponsored by the Garment District Alliance. The space will be designed as a vignette of a milliner’s studio with hats displayed throughout.

The Milliners Guild is comprised of professional hat makers from around the US. This exhibition will showcase the designs of 24 Guild members, each creating a Fall hat using using our Guild brand colors. There will be a range of innovative millinery techniques and beautiful textiles including fur felts, silk, leather and wool.

Please stop by the window and take a look when you visit the Garment District during Textile Month.

The Milliners Guild is a non-profit organization committed to increasing the public profile of millinery as well as the public's awareness and interest in millinery products. Through a collective website, special events and educational seminars the Guild provides communication about this thriving and contemporary industry to the public, press and students of the craft.

Participating milliners include:
Linda Ashton (NY), Kathy Anderson (NY), Laura Moser (KY), Ellen Christine (NY), Evetta Petty (NY), Wanda Chambers (NY), Katie Props-Allen (NC), Jennifer Hoertz (NY), Lisa McFadden (NY), Sally Caswell (NY), Amy Fowler (CA), Judith Solodkin (NY), Sheree Tams (NY), Laura Del Villaggio (TX), Barbara Volker (NY), Kim Fraser (NC), Monika Stebbins (NJ), Amina Hood (MO) Lisa Shaub (NY), Michael McCants (NY), Maria Koruz (NY), June Gumbel (NY), Maria Etkind (LA), Karen Morris (MN)


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Sep
2
to Sep 30

Purl Soho: Make A Community YoYo Quilt Event

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Purl Soho: Make A Community YoYo Quilt Event

Come make a yo-yo for our community quilt at Purl Soho! Make a what? A yo-yo! You know, the little fabric circles that look like adorable squashed bonnets... We're assembling them into a quilt in our window all month long to celebrate New York Textile Month! Stop by our shop to make a yo-yo (or two or three or twenty!). We'll have instructions and free materials available every Monday, Thursday, and Saturday in September from 4-6pm. Join in the fun, learn a new skill, make some friends, and watch our quilt grow!

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Purl Soho in collaboration with Lidewij Edelkoort Color Trend 2020

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Purl Soho in collaboration with Lidewij Edelkoort Color Trend A/W 2021-22

In honor of NYTM Lidewij Edelkoort, the founder of NYTM selected six color palets of yarns from Purl Soho’s yarns selection. The palets reflect Edelkoort’s forecast for A/W 2012-20 color trend

Purl Soho: Their clients indulge in extremely soft and sensuous materials; sampled and designed with tenderness and intent. Founded by a best friend and two sisters (Page Marchese Norman and Joelle and Jennifer Hoverson) Purl Soho started out at the beginning of this century as if it forebode how the world would soon be in dire need of craft, quality and humanity. Following their first small stores selling knitting and quilting supplies, they now have a large flagship; a well-kept secret, miraculously proving that the Soho district can still contain one place of integrity to satisfy customers’ creativity.

Together with their favorite suppliers, they blend fiber, twist yarn and give color. Great colorists themselves, the store vibrates with mellow tones of tinted neutrals and muted brighter hues. Yarns are derived from yak, camel and cashmere goats but also woolens, of course, play a dominant role. In the business of developing yarns for knitting and weaving, they are a rare sight in today’s culture of the ready-made. Surrounded by luxury retailers, they use a sotto voce to narrate another vision of what defines luxury today; a quiet, almost still approach to color and a slow manifest for making. meditative mentality and a tree-hugging lifestyle, where noble yarns might embrace twigs as if embodying beauty in its raw form; delivering the different shades related to nature’s most precious organic material. This wool and wood dance in unison, and in slow motion, rendering materials in their essential spirit.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Open Studio: Loop of the Loom at the new Dumbo Studio

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Open Studio: Loop of the Loom at the new Dumbo Studio

Join NYTM by experiencing the SAORI weaving with us! New York Textile Month (NYTM) is a month-long city-wide festival designed to celebrate textile creativity and promote textile awareness. During NYTM, Loop of the Loom is offering a short trial session for FREE throughout the month of September in our brand new studio in Dumbo. No appointment needed, just drop in.

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Dosa Inc flyingfishprojects

  • Varick Street New York NY 10013 United States (map)
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flyingfishprojects Christina Kim’s new area of work, one that I have been thinking about for a while. She see it as an extension of dosa but with a focus on individual pieces, limited series, and installations, made at different scales and more fully considered. 

Christina Kim hopes to use my hands more while continuing to collaborate with artisans and artists. her intention is to make work that engages visually and tactilely to communicate ideas, stories, or a point of view. The projects will emphasize work made by hand, guided by intuition, focused on the edges as much as the whole, informed by the process of making, and open to chance and change. She sees flyingfishprojects as non-categorical work, existing somewhere between my design practice and my interest in making art. I will continue with dosa's ethos of making work that is organic, recycled, and off the grid; maintaining a goal of zero waste; and always trying to think outside the box.

The first flyingfishproject, "desert flora from moorten botanical garden in palm springs," are translations, in appliqué and embroidery, of nine sketches made at the garden in 2018. The handwork was done at Devi studio in Kolkata, India, using leftover Jamdani fabric. She was introduced to Moorten while preparing for the exhibit “Scraps” at the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center. Charmed by the plants and drawn to the spirit and whimsy of the place, I made repeated joy-filled excursions there. 

By appointment only: asaka@dosainc.com , 212 431 1733

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Sep
1
to Sep 29

MAD’s Artist Studios : Jennie Maydew

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MAD’s Artist Studios : Jennie Maydew

Artist and educator Jennie Maydew employs traditional craft methods to achieve modern utility. At MAD, Maydew will construct a system of customizable, egalitarian, and modular storage components for garments titled Wearable Auxiliaries. The system is constructed from a no-waste pattern, a sustainable method of design that utilizes all of the fabric, including the scraps. The components are machine washable, sourced from reclaimed materials, and include a DIY button kit that teaches consumers to sew buttons on their existing garments in support of the continuity of craft.

Maydew holds a BFA in textiles and art education from Colorado State University and was awarded the Windgate Fellowship in 2016 from the Center for Craft, Creativity & Design. She is a 2019-2020 fellow with Art21 and currently teaches youth and adults in Brooklyn.

Visit Jennie in MAD’s Artist Studios Sundays, 10 am–5 pm.


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Aug
27
to Sep 30

B&B ITALIA partners with 10 Corso Como to celebrate the Up Series 50th anniversary

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B&B ITALIA partners with 10 Corso Como to celebrate the Up Series 50th anniversary

Italian concept store 10 Corso Como, which opened its first U.S. location at New York’s Seaport District in September 2018, will debut a special in-store display of B&B Italia’s iconic Up Series that celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

In 1969, B&B Italia teamed up with renowned designer Gaetano Pesce for one of the most notable collections in the history of furniture design, titled the Up Series. B&B Italia celebrates the 50th anniversary of the renowned collection by partnering with 10 Corso Como New York, the city’s premier experiential retail destination that features an ever-changing blend of design, art and fashion alongside a gallery and an Italian restaurant. Beginning

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Aug
25
to Sep 27

“Stitching Boundaries : The Topography of Living”

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“Stitching Boundaries : The Topography of Living


A collaboration by Ged Merino and Aze Ong both working with textiles "The GedAze Project" creating an interactive and immersive installation of an imaginary map using crochet, knotting and repurposed textiles incorporating photo images of "Places-Objects-Relationships-Memories via a participatory process through social media.
A performance by Aze Ong using her crocheted installations will activate the opening exhibit

"Stitching Boundaries" is made possible by the Queens Council of The Arts from The New York City City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council
with support from the Drawing Room Contemporary Art

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Aug
7
to Sep 29

Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall

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Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall

On view at the Brooklyn Museum: Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall Commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising—a six-day clash between police and civilians ignited by a routine raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City—and explores its profound legacy within contemporary art and visual culture today. The exhibition draws its title from the rallying words of transgender artist and activist Marsha P. Johnson, underscoring both the precariousness and the vitality of LGBTQ+ communities. The exhibition presents twenty-eight LGBTQ+ artists born after 1969 whose works grapple with the unique conditions of our political time, and question how moments become monuments. Through painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and video, these artists engage interconnected themes of revolt, commemoration, care, and desire.


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Jun
20
to Sep 29

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

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Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is the first New York retrospective in forty years to focus on the legendary couturier. Drawn primarily from Pierre Cardin’s archive, the exhibition traverses the designer’s decades-long career at the forefront of fashion invention. Known today for his bold, futuristic looks of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, Cardin extended his design concepts from fashion to furniture, industrial design, and beyond.

The exhibition presents over 170 objects drawn from his atelier and archive, including historical and contemporary haute couture, prêt-à-porter, trademark accessories, “couture” furniture, lighting, fashion sketches, personal photographs, and excerpts from television, documentaries, and feature films. The objects are displayed in an immersive environment inspired by Cardin’s unique atelier designs, showrooms, and homes.

Highlights of Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion include rare designs in luxury fabrics from the 1950s; a large grouping from the landmark 1964 “Cosmocorps” collection, which sought to streamline menswear by eliminating excessive detailing; creations that incorporate vinyls, plastics, and the self-named Cardine synthetic fabric; signature unisex ensembles featuring full knit bodysuits with layered skirts, vests, bibs, and jewelry; iconic broad-shouldered jackets from the 1980s based on Japanese origami, Chinese architecture, and American football uniforms; “illuminated” jumpsuits and dresses; recent couture eveningwear; and an extensive overview of Cardin’s recently designed couture menswear.

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is curated and designed by Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum

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Jun
12
to Sep 30

Lingua Franca Presents Tiny Pricks Project by Diana Weymar

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Lingua Franca Presents Tiny Pricks Project by Diana Weymar

 Lingua Franca is thrilled to present Tiny Pricks Project, a public art project by artist/activist Diana Weymar, on view at 382 Bleecker Street from June 12 to September 3. Tiny Pricks is an ongoing community project in which participants stitch quotes by Trump into antique textiles to create a material record of his presidency—and the movement against it. Since Weymar started the collaborative project in January of 2018, over 700 people across the world have submitted unique, hand-stitched contributions. This exhibition marks the first time the work will be on display in New York. As a call to action, Weymar and Lingua Franca invite the public to participate by contributing a work to the series, which will enter the Tiny Pricks public archive. 

Tiny Pricks Projects holds a creative, accessible and cathartic space during a tumultuous political climate. The series counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, other social media, and Trump’s statements by utilizing vintage textiles as a memory making timeline. Weymar references the key role embroidery played in the women’s suffrage movement, and notes it is symbolic of warmth, comfort, craft, civility, care, and a shared history. 

“This project is about witnessing, recording, taking note in thread, and paying attention,” said Weymar. The purpose is to empower people with something they've made themselves, and to reclaim the humanity that we're struggling up against.” 

“Diana’s work and the organic network that Tiny Pricks Projects ignited serves as a quiet yet poignant form of resistance,” said Lingua Franca’s Rachelle Hruska MacPherson. “I’m thrilled to showcase this work at our shop and hope it helps us bear witness to this unprecedented political moment, and remind us of the power of language.”  

Concurrent to the exhibition, a series of limited-edition Tiny Pricks t-shirts made from recycled plastic and cotton will be available for sale at the Lingua Franca shop. Insert further details here. 

Diana Weymar is a textile artist and activist. She has worked on projects with Build Peace (Nicosia, Bogota and Zurich), the Arts Council of Princeton, the Nantucket Atheneum, the W.E.B Du Bois Center at UMass Amherst, the University of Puget Sound, The Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), the Peddie School, Open Arts Space (Damascus, Syria), Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC), New York Textile Month, the Textile Arts Center (Brooklyn, NY), and The Wing (NYC). She has exhibited her work in both Canada and the United States. Interwoven Stories and Tiny Pricks Project, both international projects, are open for public participation.

Lingua Franca is a line of sustainably-sourced, fair trade luxury cashmere sweaters, all hand-stitched by women in NYC. Founded by Rachelle Hruska MacPherson, Lingua Franca serves as a platform to inspire change – a portion of LF proceeds support activists and organizations who are working for a better world. 

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Jun
4
to Sep 29

Phenomenal Nature : Mrinalini Mukherjee

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015).  Vriksh Nata  ( Arboreal Enactment ), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015). Vriksh Nata (Arboreal Enactment), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

Phenomenal Nature : Mrinalini Mukherjee

Phenomenal Nature marks the first retrospective of the artist in the United States. The exhibition brings together fifty-seven works by Mukherjee and explores the artist's longstanding engagement with fiber, along with her significant forays into ceramic and bronze towards the middle and latter half of her career.

A committed sculptor who worked intuitively, Mukherjee explored the divide between figuration and abstraction. Nature was her primary inspiration, and she was further informed by her enthusiasm for Indian historic sculpture, modern design, and local crafts and textile traditions. Phenomenal Nature highlights the radical intervention Mukherjee made in her adaptation of crafting techniques with a modernist formalism.

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015). Vriksh Nata (Arboreal Enactment), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

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Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

NYTM Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

Intermediate/ Beginner Level Knitting- Intro to Color Work, Intro to Cables

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Sep
15
1:00 PM13:00

Open Studio: WE GATHER

WE GATHER Weaving Circle

Celebrate the magic of making textiles by hand and join us at WE GATHER’s Weaving Circle. Bring your own loom or come as you are and use one of ours. All skill levels are welcome, from complete beginner to total master. WE GATHER owner and textile artist Whitney Crutchfield will offer short tutorials on basic weaving skills, and we’ll have some of our favorite studio yarns on hand for textile experimentation. Stay all afternoon or just for a few minutes, and enjoy the company of others and the satisfaction of creating cloth. 

WE GATHER is a Brooklyn-based educational textile studio and brand of hand-dyed, handwoven textiles. Whether through thoughtfully and ethically-made products made right in the Brooklyn studio, at-home weaving and dyeing kits, or workshops and private events that put the skills directly in your hands, our goal is to bring the magic of textiles to all.    This event is free and open to the public, though limited spaces are available. Kindly RSVP to reserve a spot. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

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Sep
15
11:00 AM11:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

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Sep
13
7:00 PM19:00

Techno-Love Series At Fridman Gallery

Techno-Love Series Fridman Gallery, September 2018

For New York Textile Month, Weaving Hand  will participate by offering workshops for the duration of the month as well as hosting an interactive wearable dance performance towards the middle of September in lower Manhattan. The performance will be a celebratory experience that includes participants of other NYTM events, in addition to creating a fun and engaging atmosphere for everyone involved. During the course of the month, the company will be offering workshops and studio tours as well.

“Techno-Love Series 2018” 

fridman gallery will host a performative series of wearable woven cocoons, Techno-Love Series, an interactive audiovisual exhibit featured in the MAD Museum (madmuseum.org/events/ techno-love-series). They are inspired by the experiences of a recent revelatory experience enjoyed by artist Cynthia Alberto at a desert musical festival. The shape and style of the cocoons are meant to mirror the functions of Sensory Pressure Vests, which are weighted vests that are to be placed onto children or individuals who are overly stimulated to weigh them into place. They will be statically placed, but visitors can take them down and wear them on their bodies. The cocoons are built using traditional weaving methods, and utilize recycled rope from another project - MoMA’s 2016 “Weaving the Courtyard” exhibit. On the evening of September 13th, 2018 at 7PM, there will be a choreographed live performance of the pieces in a 20-minute show with electronic music, and a troupe of dancers.

Zakhele Zamisa is a New York-based music producer with a knack for hip-hop, electronic music, and their respective subgenres. He is curating the soundtrack that will serve as the backdrop to Cynthia Alberto’s interactive audiovisual exhibit Techno-Love Series.

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Sep
10
to Oct 4

Steam Stretch at Issey Miyake Tribeca

Steam Stretch at Issey Miyake Tribeca

 

Steam Stretch is a technique by which creases are woven into A Piece Of Cloth using heat reactive thread which shrinks when steam is applied to the garment. The two techniques combined to form the basis of Steam Stretch are: PLEATS, which was born in the late 1980s as a result of a constant quest for new material and technique development; and A-POC – an acronym for A Piece Of Cloth - is the approach developed in the late 1990s where garments are made by a single-form creation process. Clothes are first made into shapes and then pleated. Using this “stretchable thread,” both vertically and horizontally in the weave, it enables the fabric to be stretched or shrunk in any direction. By the simple application of steam to the cloth, the fabric that was at first flat, instantly transforms to take on a 3D form with countless surfaces, following the contours of the designed creases.

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Sep
10
10:00 AM10:00

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Mid-Career Solo Exhibition
Drawing and Sculpture with Stitch

Through her art practice, internationally celebrated Dublin artist Bernie Leahy picks apart visceral human connections, finding and laying bare the vulnerability in each chosen subject  matter. In this exhibition, Leahy has created an evocative series of stitched drawings and small sculptures, embodied with a variety of media including gold leaf, uncut diamonds and acrylic on linen and canvas. Fragments of the human form—eyes, mouths, glances—capture Leahy’s personal moments and stories and imbues them with a sense of passion and energy.

Her work plays many emotional chords, there is a common thread of kindness and humanity behind all the piecesIrish Arts Review Magazine

Prolific and brave in her use of materials – Dr. Audrey Whitty, National Museum of Ireland

September  10 - December  14  
Gallery  hours  by  appointment    
Monday  –  Friday  |  10  AM  –  6  PM    
Please  call  212-757-3318
 

Artist  Talk  &  Reception  
Monday September  10  
5:30  PM
FREE
Reservations  Encouraged

AT IRISH ARTS CENTER

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