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Filtering by: block 2
Jun
20
to Sep 29

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

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Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is the first New York retrospective in forty years to focus on the legendary couturier. Drawn primarily from Pierre Cardin’s archive, the exhibition traverses the designer’s decades-long career at the forefront of fashion invention. Known today for his bold, futuristic looks of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, Cardin extended his design concepts from fashion to furniture, industrial design, and beyond.

The exhibition presents over 170 objects drawn from his atelier and archive, including historical and contemporary haute couture, prêt-à-porter, trademark accessories, “couture” furniture, lighting, fashion sketches, personal photographs, and excerpts from television, documentaries, and feature films. The objects are displayed in an immersive environment inspired by Cardin’s unique atelier designs, showrooms, and homes.

Highlights of Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion include rare designs in luxury fabrics from the 1950s; a large grouping from the landmark 1964 “Cosmocorps” collection, which sought to streamline menswear by eliminating excessive detailing; creations that incorporate vinyls, plastics, and the self-named Cardine synthetic fabric; signature unisex ensembles featuring full knit bodysuits with layered skirts, vests, bibs, and jewelry; iconic broad-shouldered jackets from the 1980s based on Japanese origami, Chinese architecture, and American football uniforms; “illuminated” jumpsuits and dresses; recent couture eveningwear; and an extensive overview of Cardin’s recently designed couture menswear.

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is curated and designed by Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum

Leadership support for this exhibition is provided by

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Sep
29
1:00 PM13:00

Pollution Hues: Exploring Water Quality Through Natural Dyes

Pollution Hues: Exploring Water Quality Through Natural Dyes

Once prevalent across all cultures, natural dyes were quickly replaced by synthetic dyes after their discovery in the nineteenth century. Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used.

High in tannins and readily available, avocado seeds are some of the most reliable colorants from nature. They yield a variety of (mostly pink) hues, depending on the quality of the water it is paired with.

During this workshop, participants will experiment with a variety of water samples from around the world to explore how different characteristics, like alkalinity and mineral content, affect the hues obtained from avocado seeds. Each participant will receive fabric samples to experiment with and a zine with information about natural dyes and water quality. They will also be able to save the fabric samples they will dye during the workshop with their respective notes.

Through this alternative way to explore water quality, participants will engage in different conversations regarding pollution and how seemingly innocuous substances can have harmful effects when present in high concentrations.

Pollution Hues, an accompanying workshop, will be held at A/D/O on 8/29/18 to experiment with color extraction using avocado seeds and a variety of water samples from around the world.

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Sep
23
1:00 PM13:00

Open Studio: Jeannine Han

New York Textile Month is pleased to announce an invitation to Jeannine Han’s Open Studio on September 23rd from 1pm - 4pm. She has participated in our annual open studios in the past and this year she will discuss her current work in hand weaving processes. There will be light refreshments served, all are welcome!

Jeannine Han, lives and works in NY

Jeannine Han is an artist and designer living and working in New York where you’ll
often find her in the studio exploring materiality through textiles, fashion and film. Her
works have also involved developing highly technical sound sensor textile materials
developed a way of creating new instrument interfaces, synthesizer sources, and
tones in music harmony. Currently Jeannine is teaching at several different academic
institutions in NYC; Parsons, FIT and Pratt Institute in various disciplines and
technologies. She focuses on opening a trans-disciplinary dialogue in fashion and
textile forms.
Jeannine holds a Masters in Fine Arts degree from the Swedish School of
Textiles and completed a post studies program at The Royal Institute of Art,
Stockholm in Fine Art, and holds a B.F.A degree in Design/ Media Arts from
University of California Los Angeles(UCLA). Her most recent works have
been exhibited at Entrée Gallery, Bergen, Norway, Sculpture Center, NY,
Bard Graduate Center of Material Studies, NY, ICA London (in collaboration
with Tamara Henderson), and Performa 13

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Sep
22
2:00 PM14:00

Open Studio: Thompson Street Studio experimental quilting workshop

Kiva Motnyk, founder of Thompson Street Studio, invites you to her Soho studio for a tour and short experimental quilting workshop. We will learn the hands on process of creating a small quilted textile using repurposed, or naturally dyed materials in free form way. Materials will be provided however Students are invited to bring meaningful textiles they would like to incorporate into the piece. 

Thompson Street Studio designs objects for the home with a focus on experimental textiles. We explore connections between art, industry and nature through a process of conception, collaboration and innovation. 

Our goal is to inspire community, building on traditional techniques to create heirlooms with modernist sensibility.

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Sep
22
1:00 PM13:00

A Joint Open Studio at Brooklyn Fire Proof Studios

Fragmentario – Ste 417

Before the mid-nineteenth century, plants and other natural sources were used across all cultures to color fiber. After the discovery of synthetic dyes, natural dyes were quickly replaced and an important part of civilization was forgotten. Fragmentario seeks to explore natural dyes in a modern context and inspire conversations about cultural heritage and collective memory. 

Fragmentario was founded in Brooklyn in 2016 by Maria Elena Pombo, a fashion design graduate from Parsons School of Design who has worked at Michael Kors and other New York based designers.

@Fragmentario_

 

Pouch NYC – Ste 317

Founded in 2017, Pouch is a New York-based furniture design studio in the business of reconceptualizing comfort. In collaboration with artisans in Chalate, El Salvador, the Pouch design collective consists of New York-based artisans and designers contributing their craft and creative perspectives to a common platform. The resulting product integrates timeless handwoven techniques from Central America with endless customization options for an elevated style of hammocks that challenges existing modern environments. Pouch extends the versatility of hammocks and hanging chairs, aiming to make the physical experience of leisure readily available within the parameters of contemporary living.

@ pouchnyc

 

Anthemia – Ste 305

Anthemia is created by farmer, herbalist, and artist Barrie Cohen. 

 Barrie grew up in New York City but always felt a deep connection to nature. In her early twenties, she began working on organic vegetable farms, first in New Zealand, and then across the U.S., from California to New York. Through years of farming and study, Barrie became increasingly well-versed in plants and their medicinal properties, eventually falling in love with the traditional practice of plant dyeing.

 Today, Barrie works out of her studio in Brooklyn but still frequents local farms where she collects flowers and dye plants. Through Anthemia , Barrie combines her artistry in dyeing with her training in tarot. The result is one-of-a-kind garments that reflect the magic possibilities of dressing with intention

@anthemia.co

 

Laine + Alliage NY – Ste 301

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Sep
21
3:00 PM15:00

Open Studio: Suzanne Tick

Open Studio: Suzanne Tick

Suzanne Tick is the founder of Suzanne Tick Inc., specializing in materials brand strategy, product design, development, and direction for commercial interiors. Suzanne is currently partnering with Tarkett on Brand Strategy and Product Development, Creative Director for LUUM textiles, and Design Consultant for Tandus Centiva.

Tick Studio operates out of a townhouse in the East Village, where Suzanne works and lives. The building was the site of the Reuben Gallery in the late fifties and early sixties, where Anita Reuben invented art Happenings and where artists such as Jim Dine, Allan Kaprow, Robert Whitman, Claes Oldenburg, Red Grooms, and many more exhibited their work. This rich tradition of creativity and exploration carries on into the present day, where the newly renovated Tick Studio develops a range of products including glass, floorcovering, upholstery, drapery, and wallcovering. Suzanne also maintains a fine art hand weaving practice and creates woven sculptures from repurposed materials that are collected and exhibited worldwide.

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Sep
20
6:30 PM18:30

Lidewij Edelkoort & Christie Wright Discuss Moooi's Extinct Animal Collection

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Lidewij Edelkoort & Christie Wright Discuss Moooi's Extinct Animal Collection 

Come celebrate our launch of the Extinct Animal Fabric collection, during New York Textile Month!

Watch Lidewij Edelkoort, Trend Forecaster and Initiator & Editor of New York Textile Month and Christie Wright, Art Direction at Moooi, discuss textiles during a panel moderated by Metropolis Magazine’s editor-in-chief Avinash Rajagopal.

While you enjoy cocktails & hors d’oeuvres, discover how we push the boundaries withnew textile production processes, how we created a fabric collection inspired by theMuseum of Extinct Animals and how our sketches became reality!

RSVP

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Sep
20
12:00 PM12:00

TINY PRICKS: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump

TINY PRICKS: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump

Tiny Pricks is a project in which participants stitch quotes by Trump into antique or inherited textiles to create a material record of his presidency. Pieces are donated to a travelling collection to be exhibited around the country. The methodology of the project is based on social media sharing, participatory political protest, and craftivism. To view over 100 pieces created to date, please follow the series on Diana Weymar. Tiny Pricks counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, social media, and Trump’s overall approach to politics.

 

This is a special workshop co-hosted by Planthouse Gallery artist and activist Diana Weymar. Information on creation, documentation, and sharing of your Tiny Prick piece will be outlined at the workshop but here’s a brief introduction to the project. If you are unable to make the workshop, you can email diana@weymar.com for complete instructions and participate remotely.

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HOW TO PARTICIPATE :

 


1. Picking a quote. I generally use Trump’s recent Twitter feed as a guide but have occasionally, as many others have, quoted statements he’s made over the decades. If you have a creative source or other reference material, please let me know. As long as it has a context to the series, it will work. For example, I used a James Comey quote for a piece.
2. Picking a textile. I use inherited textiles from my grandparents, donated by friends and strangers, and iconic textiles relating to the content of the piece. Things to consider when picking your textile: How is it to stitch into? Will the text be easy to read? If not using a hoop - handheld - is it thick or stiff enough to use (see examples of handkerchiefs folding into smaller squares with stitching through all four layers)? Can a washable fabric marker be used on it? (Ink is blue.) Is it the right size for my quote? Can it fit the entire quote? How much “blank space” is there for stitching? Does the design of the textile resonate with the content of my quote? 3. Merging quote and textile. I generally used washable transfer markers (available at craft stores) but I have also used a pencil and, in rare cases with thick textile, a thin Sharpie. Map out your piece, trace the shape of your textile onto a piece of paper, practice spacing and style of your quote on the paper, and then outline final version with a sharpie, lay textile over it, trace the text onto the textile with a washable marker.

 


ONCE YOUR PIECE IS FINISHED:

 After your piece has been stitched, washable marker removed, ironed, and photographed, it’s ready to be published. As you can see from my Instagram account, all pieces are given a number in the series. From there, pieces can have titles, hashtags, quotes, explanations, links, historical documentation, personal statements, or, one of my favorite, lyrics from pop songs. This is your moment to further share the thoughts that didn’t come out in the thread. If you like. I can also provide documentation for your pieces. You’re also welcome to share your piece on social media if you’re on it and to invite others to join you in making pieces.


All original pieces are mailed to me - I provide my contact information in the complete instructions and become a permanent part of the collection. You are credited as the artist of your piece in all documents and exhibits with an Index.

 The ultimate goal is to have thousands of Tiny Pricks created from around the world as a global reaction to this presidency. Making something beautiful out of something unpleasant and, to be frank, that has set off for many a kind of unraveling of values and security. Certainly, this is a way of creating something out of confusion.

 Please email me with questions, comments, concerns ... this project is in its early stages and it grows and evolves as others join it. diana@weymar.com. I am always collecting textiles for the project so please let me know if you have some to donate.

 Thank you,

 Diana Weymar

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

The Textile Arts Center is pleased to present Three Walls, the culminating exhibition of the 9th cycle of Artists in Residence.  

During the nine months residency, the eight artists worked alone, together. Their studios comprised only 3 walls; the lack of a fourth wall necessitated that their practices be shared and that their work inspired and conversed with each other.

Sculptural eyes seem to read hidden hand woven messages; a quilt designed to be worn meets a fiber depiction of a body, both crafted to protect; garments that research the dynamic relationship between maker/wearer and explore the complexities of function/value; and found images, layered and transformed, turn into paintings, while found materials are repurposed into sculptures.

The  artists in Three Walls come from a range of creative backgrounds, and the collective body of work featured reflects this variety of experience. However there’s a sense of unity. An empathetic identification. In concept, form, and process, they are companions.

Artists in Three Walls are Jamie Boyle, Rhonda Khalifeh, Junyu Li, Lily Moebes, Meghan O'Sullivan, Cory Siegler, Hannah Whelan and Chang Yuchen.

OPENING RECEPTION: September 20, 6-9pm
ARTIST TALK: September 23, 7pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

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2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

Piecework Collective brings together artists from around the world, using unique aesthetics, processes, and materials to explore traditional patchwork and quilting. The Collective exists as a means to showcase work by contemporary artists - united by a love of the art form, a sense of community, and its connection to history - in order to communicate and strengthen the value of textiles and craftsmanship. The goal of the Collective is to inspire, educate, and foster community through art.

The 2018 Piecework Collective exhibition will feature new work from:  ace&jig, Abigail Booth of Forest + Found, Lindsay Degen of DEGEN, Season Evans, Coulter Fussell of YaloRUN Textiles, Lesley Gold, Ruby Hoppen, Lucia Lienhard-Giesigner of Bosna Quilt Werstatt, Lauren MacDonald of Working Cloth, Lorena Marañon,Kiva Motnyk of Thompson Street Studio, Kyle Parent of KTWP Quilts, and 

opening reception: Thursday, Sept 20th, 6-10pm

Meet the artists Sunday, September 23, 1pm-3pm

 

Friday, Sept 21, 11am-6pm

Saturday, Sept 22, 11am-6pm

Sunday, Sept 23, 11am-6pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 30

Liz Collins: Rays

Liz Collins: Rays

Launched in spring 2018, 1ST SITE is a project space located in MAD’s reception area, dedicated to works that interact with and interpret the interior architecture and ambiance of the entry. This fall, the space will house an installation by Liz Collins, an artist included in the Museum’s permanent collection. The installation is drawn from Collins’ “Rays” wallpaper series, the design of which she completed during her 2015 residency in the MAD Artist Studios Program.

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Sep
19
7:00 PM19:00

Curating Tapestries at The Met

Curating Tapestries at The Met
Elizabeth Cleland, Associate Curator, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Elizabeth Cleland works as a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and is responsible for the museum’s world-class collection of tapestries. She organized 2014’s exhibition Grand Design: Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Renaissance Tapestry, and Relative Values: The Cost of Art in the Northern Renaissancecurrently on view at The Met; right now, she is preparing another big exhibition celebrating the art of The Tudors. At Harrison, she will recount some of the excitements and the challenges encountered in her job, including the nuts and bolts of putting together major loan exhibitions, writing catalogues, acquiring art works, and interacting with the public.

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Sep
19
11:00 AM11:00

HINSON: Burnishing the ON in icONic

HINSON: Burnishing the ON in icONic

HINSON: Burnishing the ON in icONic. When Donghia, Inc. acquired HINSON in 2014 it got a storied brand whose name and product brought wistful memories into the minds of some of the world’s top designers, along with a handful of quirky yet much-adored textiles. Though hearts were full, knowing that the brand would go on, sales weren’t quite reflecting the love. The question quickly become, “Where do we go from here?”

Join David Toback, Donghia’s Director of Textiles, and team HINSON for an informative talk and festive inside look at the process and product associated with restoring relevance to an iconic brand. Also, be among the very first to see HINSON’s latest collection, “Star Power.”

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Sep
18
5:00 PM17:00

Textile Tutorial Night at Purl Soho

Textile Tutorial Night at Purl Soho

Join Purl Soho for Textile Tutorial Night! In celebration of New York Textile Month, our instructors will be offering two hours of fun and informative hands-on tutorials and demonstrations in weaving, knitting, and crochet. Bring your questions and curiosity as we explore all things textile during this free get-together! Come by our shop at 459 Broome Street on September 18th from 5 to 7pm. All craft levels encouraged!

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Sep
18
to Oct 4

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Opening Reception, September 20th at 6:00 pm

The work of FIT students and faculty takes center stage in the Gallery FIT exhibition Crafting Change. Organized by the Textile/Surface Design Department in conjunction with New York Textile Month, the works featured in Crafting Change use long established techniques in a modern context to explore the shifting boundaries between art, design, and technology. The use of hand crafting techniques combined with digital processes, preserves tradition while pushing textiles into the future.  Projects bridging science and textiles have the potential to revolutionize the fashion and textile industries, leading us to a more sustainable world. These works are promising examples of how FIT is successfully encouraging interdisciplinary mergers between craft, technology, and sustainability to usher textile arts into the 21st century.

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Sep
17
6:30 PM18:30

Folk + Feminism Book Club | Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

Folk + Feminism Book Club | Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

AT THE SELF-TAUGHT GENIUS GALLERY LONG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS

Criminality and handcraft coexist as the predominant themes of Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace. The book is based on the true crime account of nineteenth-century author Susanna Moodie. Atwood constructs an imagined biography of infamous murderess Grace Marks (1828–c.1873), an Irish-born Canadian domestic servant, convicted in 1843 of murdering her employer, Thomas Kinnear, and his housekeeper, Nancy Montgomery. The novel unfolds through a series of conversations between Grace and fictional psychiatrist Dr. Simon Jordan. Sedately stitching away, Grace reveals fragments of her memories, piecing together details of her life story and alleged crime that come together like the blocks of a patchwork quilt.

In the spirit of the novel, this Folk + Feminism Book Club explores craft and crime, and memory and history, through a two-part talk inspired by the idea of the quilt as a metaphor. First, dilettante and cultural historian Sara Clugage will address the sociopolitical context of Atwood’s novel, delving into systems of gender, craft, and labor in the mid-nineteenth century. Following, New York Times bestselling novelist Kimberly McCreight will unpack the craft of psychological crime fiction, speaking to the ways that writers piece together narratives across time, merging memory and experience to bring new meaning to the present.

Please be assured that familiarity with Alias Grace is not required to attend this inaugural Folk + Feminism Book Talk. This program is organized in conjunction with Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts, an exhibition prompting visitors to read quilts as maps, tracing the paths of individual stories and experiences that illuminate larger historic events and cultural trends.

Light refreshments will be served.

Please note that this program takes place on the second floor, which is accessed by stairs. For participants who require an elevator, please email stggallery@folkartmuseum.org to make arrangements in advance.

 

Sara Clugage is a dilettante. She lives and works in Brooklyn, where she is the editor-in-chief of Dilettante Army, an online publication for art and critical theory. In addition to weaving and writing, she acts as a director for the Craft Advanced Research Projects Agency (CARPA), is part of the Leadership Collective for the Wikipedia campaign Art+Feminism, and hosts a series of salon dinners themed on the artistic production models and culinary histories of diverse times and places. She holds an MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Kimberly McCreight  is the New York Times bestselling author of Reconstructing Amelia, optioned for film by HBO and Nicole Kidman’s Blossom Films; Where They Found Her; and The Outliers, a young adult trilogy. The Collide, the final book in The Outliers trilogy, was published this July. Ms. McCreight has been nominated for the Edgar, Anthony, and Alex Awards. She attended Vassar College and graduated cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and two daughters.

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Sep
17
to Sep 21

Talant! Showcasing The Finalists For The Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Talent! exhibit showcasing the finalists for the Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Mohawk proudly sponsors this prize to support emerging textile designers

Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort and fellow curator Philip Fimmano are pleased to announce the creation of a new international design prize to be awarded to a textile or fashion design student who exhibits innovative thinking and inspiring creativity in textiles.

The Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize honors Dorothy Waxman, the original driving force behind Trend Union and EDELKOORT INC. in the United States and contributing reporter to the magazines View on Colour, Textile View and Viewpoint. Waxman’s insatiable curiosity and discerning eye for the avant-garde has inspired Edelkoort and her team for decades. Waxman also introduced the American fashion industry to European textile partners with her work at the Fashion Group. As an avid textile aficionado, she believes that creative fabrics can change the design landscape in profound ways.

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Sep
15
to Sep 30

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Conversations On Textiles At The School Of Design, Pratt Institute

This exhibition will highlight the vibrant and provocative conversations that the faculty and
students of the School of Design participate in while interrogating textiles. The field of
textiles is a wellspring of inspiration to both the fashion, product and interior design
program’s material explorations and theoretical thinking.

As they work outside of the academic structure of a traditional textile program, the
students and faculty at the School of Design bring energy, focus and a pragmatic naiveté
to the subject of textiles. The exhibition will illustrate this conversation through student
course work and selected professors’ theoretical and professional endeavors relating to
textiles.

Opening hours: 11AM-6PM

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Sep
15
3:00 PM15:00

Textile Design Workshop — Explore Weaving Techniques

Textile Design Workshop  — Explore Weaving Techniques

Make your own textile with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio! Learn the traditional indigenous back strap weaving technique, and leave with your own sample weaving. All materials will be provided. Recommended for audiences 18 years and older. Registration is required. $30 General Admission; $20 Cooper Hewitt Member, Student, Educator; $10 Seniors.

This event is free. Registration is not required. (official page)

Celebrate NYC Textile Month with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center! Join us on Saturday, September 15 at Brooklyn’s Industry City, 220 36th Street, for design workshops. We invite all audiences to come gain exposure to design and the design process. No prior experience with design is needed to participate.

Register today.

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PJ GUBATINA POLICARPIO is a San Francisco-based artist, educator, curator, programmer, writer and community organizer. His multidisciplinary practice utilizes research, writing, collaboration, programming, publications, pedagogy and public engagement as both art and tool. PJ creates intersections for meaningful connections between communities and art, especially addressing a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural audience. His publication Textiles of the Philippines is in the collection of The Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

SUSAN BROWN is Associate Curator of Textiles at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, where she has organized numerous highly successful exhibitions with accompanying publications, including Fashioning Felt,  Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, David Adjaye Selects, and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile, and also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design.

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Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident

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Introducing Kathleen Mcdermott September's Work In Progress Resident At Tac

Kathleen McDermott is a media artist with a background in installation and sculpture. She uses a combination of textiles, sculptural materials and open-source electronics to craft absurd wearable technology pieces that aim to explore the relationship between human bodies and technology, in both real and imagined scenarios. In addition to her artistic practice, she is an advocate for accessible technology education, sharing tutorials for working with DIY electronics on urbanarmor.org. 

During her time at the WIP Residency, McDermott will be completing a large skirt covered in speakers, titled Urban Armor #8: The Public Speaker. Production research for this project has included the creation of numerous custom speaker experiments using materials such as conductive thread and magnets. The current iteration of the project uses low-cost, pre-fabricated speakers, individually soldered to mini-amplifiers, and sewn into the garment. The Public Speaker will ultimately be linked to a microphone, and will playback sounds it picks up as the wearer moves through the city, as a kind of mockingbird/surveillance machine. The Public Speaker is part of Urban Armor, a larger series of experimental wearable electronics which respond to environmental and urban data in unique and ridiculous ways, in an effort to bridge the gap between speculative, virtual and physical spaces.  

Kathleen holds a BFA in Sculpture from Cornell University, an MFA in Creative Media from City University of Hong Kong, and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Electronic Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is currently a Visiting Industry Assistant Professor of Integrated Digital Media (IDM) at NYU

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Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

NYTM Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

Intermediate/ Beginner Level Knitting- Intro to Color Work, Intro to Cables

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Sep
15
1:00 PM13:00

Open Studio: WE GATHER

WE GATHER Weaving Circle

Celebrate the magic of making textiles by hand and join us at WE GATHER’s Weaving Circle. Bring your own loom or come as you are and use one of ours. All skill levels are welcome, from complete beginner to total master. WE GATHER owner and textile artist Whitney Crutchfield will offer short tutorials on basic weaving skills, and we’ll have some of our favorite studio yarns on hand for textile experimentation. Stay all afternoon or just for a few minutes, and enjoy the company of others and the satisfaction of creating cloth. 

WE GATHER is a Brooklyn-based educational textile studio and brand of hand-dyed, handwoven textiles. Whether through thoughtfully and ethically-made products made right in the Brooklyn studio, at-home weaving and dyeing kits, or workshops and private events that put the skills directly in your hands, our goal is to bring the magic of textiles to all.    This event is free and open to the public, though limited spaces are available. Kindly RSVP to reserve a spot. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

The Lori Weitzner Design studio is hosting a one-day, pop-up exhibition of imaginative work created by Textile Design students from Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). The curated designs showcase undergraduate and graduate Textile Designers’ innovations, highlighting the marriage of artisanal processes and the latest technologies. Sustainability, international cultures and maker spaces are emphasized. Join alumni, faculty and students for this exclusive look into the Jefferson Textile Design Bachelor of Science and Master of Science programs.

12pm - 1pm

2pm-3pm

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Textile Design Workshop — Explore Color and Pattern

Textile Design Workshop — Explore Color and Pattern

Participants will play with color, pattern and other design elements to design textiles with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio and Cynthia Alberto, Founder and Director of Weaving Hand. This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages. Children must be over the age of 5 to participate.

This event is free. Registration is not required.

This event is free. Registration is not required. (official page)

Celebrate NYC Textile Month with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center! Join us on Saturday, September 15 at Brooklyn’s Industry City, 220 36th Street, for design workshops. We invite all audiences to come gain exposure to design and the design process. No prior experience with design is needed to participate.

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PJ GUBATINA POLICARPIO is a San Francisco-based artist, educator, curator, programmer, writer and community organizer. His multidisciplinary practice utilizes research, writing, collaboration, programming, publications, pedagogy and public engagement as both art and tool. PJ creates intersections for meaningful connections between communities and art, especially addressing a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural audience. His publication Textiles of the Philippines is in the collection of The Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

CYNTHIA  ALBERTO is Filipina, an artist, weaver, weaving activist,  teacher, and founder/director of the Brooklyn-based weaving studio, Weaving Hand.  Her personal work as a fiber artist bridges traditional and contemporary weaving: drawing inspiration from ancient communities of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Cynthia honors the artisanal process of weaving while using unconventional materials to create expressions of form, structure, and function, often addressing themes such as femininity, age, and beauty as it relates to our culture today. 

nspired by her studio practice and teaching, Cynthia continuously explores diverse relationships between weaving, healing, inclusive art, craft, and sustainability.  In 2014 at Weaving Hand, Cynthia developed "Weaving Together":  a series of ongoing collaborative weaving events that focus on healing the community and create interpersonal relationships through the act of weaving together. Members of different communities are invited to bring recycled materials to weave alongside their neighbors. "Weaving Together" events were held at Pioneer WorksQueens MuseumAce Hotel, and Bldg 92 Brooklyn Navy Yard

SUSAN BROWN is Associate Curator of Textiles at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, where she has organized numerous highly successful exhibitions with accompanying publications, including Fashioning Felt,  Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, David Adjaye Selects, and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile, and also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design.

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Cooper Hewitt Conversations

Cooper Hewitt Conversations

Join Cooper Hewitt curator Susan Brown in conversation with PJ Gubatina Policarpio to discover how the rich history of textiles informs current techniques and innovations. Geek out on the past, present, and future of textile design! This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages.

This event is free. Registration is not required. (official page)

Celebrate NYC Textile Month with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center! Join us on Saturday, September 15 at Brooklyn’s Industry City, 220 36th Street, for design workshops. We invite all audiences to come gain exposure to design and the design process. No prior experience with design is needed to participate.

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12:00 PM–2:00 PM: TEXTILE DESIGN WORKSHOP— EXPLORE COLOR AND PATTERN

Participants will play with color, pattern and other design elements to design textiles with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio and Cynthia Alberto, Founder and Director of  Weaving Hand. This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages. Children must be over the age of 5 to participate.

2:30–3:00 PM: COOPER HEWITT CONVERSATIONS

Join Cooper Hewitt curator Matilda McQuaid in conversation with PJ Gubatina Policarpio to discover how the rich history of textiles informs current techniques and innovations. Geek out on the past, present, and future of textile design! This is a free event and offered on a first-come, first-served basis to audiences of all ages.

3:00–4:00 PM: TEXTILE DESIGN WORKSHOP— EXPLORE WEAVING TECHNIQUES

Make your own textile with San Francisco-based designer PJ Gubatina Policarpio and  Cynthia Alberto, Founder and Director of Weaving Hand! Learn the traditional indigenous back strap weaving technique, and leave with your own sample weaving. All materials will be provided. Recommended for audiences 18 years and older. Registration is required. $30 General Admission; $20 Cooper Hewitt Member, Student, Educator; $10 Seniors.

PJ GUBATINA POLICARPIO is a San Francisco-based artist, educator, curator, programmer, writer and community organizer. His multidisciplinary practice utilizes research, writing, collaboration, programming, publications, pedagogy and public engagement as both art and tool. PJ creates intersections for meaningful connections between communities and art, especially addressing a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural audience. His publication Textiles of the Philippines is in the collection of The Thomas J. Watson Library at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

SUSAN BROWN is Associate Curator of Textiles at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, where she has organized numerous highly successful exhibitions with accompanying publications, including Fashioning Felt,  Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance, Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Quicktakes: Rodarte, David Adjaye Selects, and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse. She has published articles in Hali, Surface Design, American Craft, TextilForum, and Modern Carpet and Textile, and also teaches in the Masters’ Program in the History of Design and Curatorial Studies offered by Cooper Hewitt with Parsons/The New School for Design.

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Sep
15
11:00 AM11:00

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Open Studio: Hand Knit Workshops at Raw Material No.52

Raw Material No.52, LLC is specialising in luxury yarn for hand knitting. Our
new AllStar line offers ethically sourced Silk, Mohair, Merino, Cashmere,
Recycled Cashmere ReVerSo (tm), high-twist Cotton, and Linen yarns, spun
exclusively for us by mills in Japan, Italy, South Africa, and the USA. In
collaboration with Botanical Colors, LLC we offer DIY Kits which pair our
AllStar yarns with botanical dyes.
RMN52 is focused and committed to sustainability, innovation and luxury for
the needle craft community. We aspire to partner with Detroit-based The
Empowerment Plan (TEP) to train and mentor associates in the craft of hand
and machine knitting. RMN52 knits Italian cashmere beanies on hand looms
in NYC exclusively branded for Detroit Denim. In the future, we will further
develop original design for DIY Kits for hand knitting. We thrive for a future
of philanthropic partnerships and creative collaborations with like-minded
visionaries.
At the NYTM Open Studios, RMN52 will feature three 2 hour Hand Knit
Workshops with accomplished Influencers and Instructors. The Beginner and
Intermediate level Workshops are free to those who aspire to join. AllStar
yarn will be available for purchase, however, feel welcome to bring your own
yarn as well. The Workshops will be offered to groups of 5-7 and will be held
in our West 57th Street Studio location. Look for the class posting and
details for Sept 15th weekend.

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Sep
14
6:30 PM18:30

Panel Discussion | Queens Memory Program: Quilting Memories of Migration

  • Self-Taught Genius Gallery American Folk Art Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Queens Memory Program: Quilting Memories of Migration

Gather with a team of quilters and storytellers to celebrate the completion of Common Thread, a twelve-week series of workshops to create a community story quilt. Organized by local artist Naomi Kuo, Common Thread invited several local quilting instructors to teach participants quilting basics, and help them explore their own family traditions of craft and creativity. The result is a community project illuminating stories of migration—memories that are illustrated visually through the quilts themselves, and relayed aurally through embedded electronics that play recorded oral histories.

Join us to hear participants reflect on their experience contributing to Common Thread, and share your own memories of migration to Queens. Alisa Martin, vice president of educational operations at the Tenement Museum (New York), will be moderating this discussion. Following the panel discussion, take a look at the Self-Taught Genius Gallery’s current exhibition, Handstitched Worlds: The Cartography of Quilts, and add your own Queens memory to the ongoing participatory embroidery project, Our Queens. Light refreshments will be served. Come celebrate with us!

Common Thread was the second “story quilt” workshop series developed by the Queens Memory Program as part of the Memories of Migration initiative, funded by a grant from Institute of Museum and Library Services. Memories of Migration was conceived by the Santa Ana Public Library (Santa Ana, CA) in partnership with Queens Library (Queens, NY), West Hartford Public Library, (West Hartford, CT), the State of New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, and New Mexico Highlands University (Las Vegas, NM). It is a three-year community memory project that gives voice to immigrant communities through the digitization and dissemination of oral histories that develop cultural heritage collections around the shared stories of migration in America.

Alisa Martin, vice president of educational operations at the Tenement Museum, is a senior arts and cultural administrator and project consultant with expertise working in organizations to align internal operations and product offerings with their strategic goals and branding efforts. Alisa led brand management and visitor services at the Brooklyn Museum, and has served as an adjunct faculty member at Baruch College and The New School. Alisa has led cross-functional teams through change management, process improvement, and audience research initiatives. Her consulting clients include the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Lincoln Center Education, BAM Local Development Corporation, and Columbia University. Before shifting her focus to the arts, Alisa spent the early years of her professional life in marketing, service quality, and human resources at MetLife and American Express. She is a graduate of Vassar College and New York University.

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Sep
14
to Sep 21

SUPERNATURAE : Artisanal Anthropology

SUPERNATURAE : Artisanal Anthropology


specially sourced, hand-woven and hand-dyed artisanal textiles from India.

dear Dori,

thank you so much!


yes, please add this blurb -- (i couldn't see where to add it -?)



Supernaturae is the culmination of many years research into artisanal textiles. Born to suit a discerning traveler, they use exquisitely hand woven organic cottons and silks, including some special embellished pieces made in West Bengal for a wearable but beautiful loungewear line. All of the collection is made in small villages across India, from the fiber up and with a focus on historical textile practices. 


For NYTM we are offering a special preview of the Summer 19 collection. Open to the public by appointment - please email info@supernaturae.com  


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Sep
14
9:30 AM09:30

Iconic Textiles

  • The Auditorium - Parsons School of Design (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Iconic Textiles

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Textiles have the power to brand a collection, communicating a company’s heritage far beyond the talents of mere marketing. Traditional fabrics have traveled from region to region throughout history, recognisable because of their unique motifs, their authentic weaves, and their local colour. Today, luxury houses build empires on the strength of their textiles, allowing the fabrics to do all the talking, narrating stories and advertising craftsmanship just like a woven billboard. Prints, tweeds, stripes and pleats are just some of the mediums that brands claim as their own; putting textiles front and centre as a business strategy in itself.

As part of NYTM, the 2018 Talking Textiles Conference will host an array of international speakers revealing the secrets and techniques behind the seams of their garments and home textiles; fuelling trends and creating icons for the decades to come.

ICONIC TEXTILES

Eventbrite - ICONIC TEXTILES

TALKING TEXTILES CONFERENCE

Full-day Ticket: $150 per person

Students & Faculty: FREE! (with valid ID)

Textiles have the power to brand a collection, communicating a company’s heritage far beyond the talents of mere marketing. Traditional fabrics have traveled from region to region throughout history, recognizable because of their unique motifs, their authentic weaves, and their local colour. Today, luxury houses build empires on the strength of their textiles, allowing the fabrics to do all the talking, narrating stories and advertising craftsmanship just like a woven billboard. Prints, stripes and pleats are just some of the mediums that brands claim as their own; putting textiles front and center as a business strategy in itself.

As part of NYTM, the 2018 Talking Textiles Conference will host an array of international speakers revealing the secrets and techniques behind the seams of their garments and home textiles; fuelling trends and creating icons for the decades to come.

9:00
Doors Open


9:30
WELCOME TO NEW YORK TEXTILE MONTH 2018
Lidewij Edelkoort, Trend Forecaster, Trend Union & Dean of Hybrid Studies, Parsons


10:00
THE TEXTILE SKIN OF MOROSO
Mirko van den Winkel, Executive Vice President, Moroso USA


10:30

PLEATS, PRINTS & THE MAGIC OF FORTUNY
Mickey Riad, Creative Director, Fortuny Venezia


11:00
Touch Break


11:30
THE PRINTS THAT BRAND US
Peter Koepke, Owner & Director, Design Library, Hudson Valley and London

12:00

ICONS FROM SCANDINAVIA: the print vocabulary of Marimekko
Anna Hakkarainen, Marimekko North America


12:30
A BRAND MADE BY HAND
Natalie Chanin, Founder & Designer, Alabama Chanin


1:00
Lunch Break


2:00
MORE PLEATS PLEASE: the folded textiles of Issey Miyake
Philip Fimmano, Director, Edelkoort Inc.


2:30
HEAVENLY TEXTILES: Divine Inspiration at the Met
Mellissa Huber, Assistant Curator, The Costume Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art


3:00
PAPISM: an iconoclastic shade of crimson
Lidewij Edelkoort, Trend Forecaster, Trend Union & Dean of Hybrid Studies, Parsons


3:15
Touch Break


3:45
THE IMPACT OF THREAD
Bernie Leahy, Artist


4:00
THE POWER OF CLOTH: the printed work of Marguerita Mergentime
Virginia Bayer, Author & Granddaughter of Miss Mergentime


4:30
2018 Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize Finalists & Winner Announcement
Philip Fimmano & Dorothy Waxman; presented by Justin Hicks, Mohawk Group


4:45
approximate end
* programme subject to minor changes

Eventbrite - ICONIC TEXTILES

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Sep
13
to Dec 14

From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

  • Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

 From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

Opening Reception September 13, 6-8pm

This exhibition, FROM THE DESERT TO THE CITY: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles,  places textiles from Late Antique Egypt in multiple contexts—their original use in the 3rd-7th centuries, their rediscovery in the early 20th century, and their reception in the present day—bringing these colorful remnants of the ancient past to life for today’s audiences.

Centering on the recent gift of 85 textile pieces from the Rose Choron Collection, the exhibition features other works from the Museum’s permanent collection together with loans from the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Opera Archives, and private collections. Works by contemporary artists Caroline Wells Chandler and Gail Rothschild bring the story of the textiles into the 21st century. 

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