exhibitions

Filtering by: exhibitions
Apr
12
to Jul 12

Nature By Design

  • Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (map)
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Nature By Design: Selections From The Permanent Collection

To accompany the special exhibition Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, Nature by Design presents nine distinct stories drawn from Cooper Hewitt’s collection of over 210,000 design objects. Throughout history, designers have observed nature, investigated its materials, and imitated and abstracted its patterns and shapes. Textiles, jewelry, furniture, cutlery, and more show how designers have interpreted nature’s rich beauty and astonishing complexity. Across scales from microscopic to monumental, and in forms familiar and unusual, we invite visitors to discover how nature and design have intersected in the past and continue to converge in our world.

Katagami — March 30–oct. 27

This exhibition highlights the traditional Japanese craft of katagami: paper stencils carved by master artisans for use in decorating textiles. These stencils often take nature as their subject, and are made from natural materials. Cooper Hewitt’s collection of katagami mostly dates to the late Edo (1603-1868) and Meiji (1868-1912) eras, when the craft was at its height. The works on view demonstrate a range of styles and cutting techniques, reflecting the great expressive potential of the medium.

To create the stencils, pounded mulberry bark is treated with fermented persimmon juice, resulting in a paper that is strong, flexible, and waterproof. Once the paper has been cut, thin silk threads are sometimes added in order to reinforce the design. These treatments are necessary because, since at least the 16th century, katagami have been employed in a dyeing technique called katazome. In this method, a highly-skilled dyer places the paper stencil over prepared fabric and applies a dye-resistant rice paste (or “resist”) through the stencil. This process is then repeated along the fabric’s length, creating an unbroken pattern. Later, when the fabric is dyed—usually with natural indigo—the areas protected by the resist remain untouched by the color. Finally, when the resist is washed away, the finished textile retains the stencil’s design.

Embroidered And Embellished — March 30–Oct. 27

A fanciful, romantic, and stylized interpretation of nature embellished men’s waistcoats in 18th-century France.  Realistic and exaggerated flowers were the preferred form of decoration and displayed the exceptional skills of France’s embroidery professionals, who employed a painterly approach that required a sophisticated color sense and delicate rendering of light and shadow to amplify the brightness of the florals. A majority of the superb waistcoats and samples in this gallery were bequeathed to Cooper Hewitt by  Richard C. Greenleaf, who in the early 20th century assembled one of the most important collections of European textiles and lace in the United States. The waistcoats, along with embroidery samples and their related designs on paper, illustrate the exquisite artistry and incomparable craftsmanship that made French design the standard for men’s dress across the royal courts of Europe.

Among the most fashionable piece of clothing for a gentleman of the ancien régime, a white silk waistcoat was the perfect canvas for displaying elaborately designed floral frameworks. To set the fashion, a gentleman needed dozens, if not hundreds, of waistcoats festooned not only with beautiful flowers, but clever references that sparked conversation. Faced with a growing demand for novelty, embroidery designers began adding animals, insects, romantic vistas, and even cultural and historical references to heighten the whimsy and topicality of their waistcoat designs. Close examination reveals the gold and silver thread, sequins, seed pearls, faceted glass, and paste beads that elevated men’s clothing to a height of elegance and intricacy rarely seen since.


Paisley — April 12–Nov. 11

Design’s tear-drop shaped motif popularly known as paisley has persisted, and its timeline of design variations reflect a diversity of natural forms. Everything from a flowering plant with its roots attached to a slender cypress tree with bent tip to a serpentine and elongated scroll have been stylized and expressed in paisley’s ornamental grammar. It is a design that for centuries has evolved with the fashion and interior styles of cultures around the world, with a complex history revealing an amalgamation of influences from Persia, India, and Europe. Integrally tied to the shawls handwoven in Kashmir during the 18th and 19th centuries, paisley derives its name from the Scottish town that became famous for producing imitation Kashmir shawls in the 19th century. Often infilled with flowers, more paisleys, and even jewels, the motif is constantly revisited by designers as we see in this display of over 80 objects from the collection—many shown for the first time. Designers, such as Etro, Zandra Rhodes, and Maharam are drawn to this timeless shape and its inherent vitality. And perhaps the secret to paisley’s immortality is the way its traditions have been adapted to combine conformity with the spirit of a wild child.

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May
20
to Apr 20

Frank Lloyd Wright Textiles: The Taliesin Line, 1955–60

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Frank Lloyd Wright Textiles: The Taliesin Line, 1955–60

In 1955, the renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) launched the first commercial venture of his long and eminent career, designing a line of affordable home products for the general consumer. The designs for the fabrics and wallpapers, based on Wright’s architectural vocabulary and inspired by specific buildings, were featured in a sample book, Schumacher's Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpapers Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright  (1955). Only 100 copies of the sample book were printed and were available exclusively to authorized dealers.

This installation presents the book and nine examples of the fabric it introduced, all from the original line produced by F. Schumacher and Co. In addition to the textiles that reflect the signature Wright aesthetic, the installation also includes two examples of Wright-designed wooden vases that were made in a very limited number and never reached the open market, and a 1954 photograph of the architect by Yosuf Karsh.

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Jun
4
to Sep 29

Phenomenal Nature : Mrinalini Mukherjee

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015).  Vriksh Nata  ( Arboreal Enactment ), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015). Vriksh Nata (Arboreal Enactment), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

Phenomenal Nature : Mrinalini Mukherjee

Phenomenal Nature marks the first retrospective of the artist in the United States. The exhibition brings together fifty-seven works by Mukherjee and explores the artist's longstanding engagement with fiber, along with her significant forays into ceramic and bronze towards the middle and latter half of her career.

A committed sculptor who worked intuitively, Mukherjee explored the divide between figuration and abstraction. Nature was her primary inspiration, and she was further informed by her enthusiasm for Indian historic sculpture, modern design, and local crafts and textile traditions. Phenomenal Nature highlights the radical intervention Mukherjee made in her adaptation of crafting techniques with a modernist formalism.

Mrinalini Mukherjee (Indian, 1949–2015). Vriksh Nata (Arboreal Enactment), 1991–92. Fiber (hemp), left: 66 1/8 x 35 3/8 x 26 3/4 in. (168 x 90 x 68 cm); center: 87 3/8 x 53 1/8 x 19 5/8 in. (222 x 135 x 50 cm); right: 93 1/4 x 46 x 27 1/8 in. (237 x 117 x 69 cm). Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

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Jun
10
to Jan 20

Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

  • Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, (map)
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Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

Designers are forging meaningful connections with nature, inspired by its properties and resources. Their collaborative processes—working with nature and in teams across multiple disciplines—are optimistic responses at this moment when humans contend with the complexities and conditions of our planet. Compelled by a sense of urgency, designers look to nature as a guide and partner.

With projects ranging from experimental prototypes to consumer products, immersive installations, and architectural constructions, Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, co-organized with Cube design museum, presents the work of sixty-two international design teams. Collaborations involve scientists, engineers, advocates for social and environmental justice, artists, and philosophers. They are engaging with nature in innovative and ground-breaking ways, driven by a profound awareness of climate change and ecological crises as much as advances in science and technology.

The exhibition themes explore seven strategies that designers are using to collaborate with nature—to understand, remediate, simulate, salvage, nurture, augment, and facilitate. The outcomes are speculative or practical and reveal new materials, creative methods, and inventive technologies. These provocations and solutions put forth by today’s extraordinary design teams serve as encouragement for an enduring and more respectful partnership with nature.

Curatorial teams from both museums developed the exhibition content, including Cooper Hewitt’s Caitlin Condell, associate curator and head of Drawings, Prints & Graphic Design; Andrea Lipps, associate curator of contemporary design; Matilda McQuaid, deputy director of curatorial and head of Textiles; and Caroline O’Connell, curatorial assistant; and Cube’s Gene Bertrand, program and development director; and Hans Gubbels, director of Cube.

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Jun
12
to Sep 30

Lingua Franca Presents Tiny Pricks Project by Diana Weymar

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Lingua Franca Presents Tiny Pricks Project by Diana Weymar

 Lingua Franca is thrilled to present Tiny Pricks Project, a public art project by artist/activist Diana Weymar, on view at 382 Bleecker Street from June 12 to September 3. Tiny Pricks is an ongoing community project in which participants stitch quotes by Trump into antique textiles to create a material record of his presidency—and the movement against it. Since Weymar started the collaborative project in January of 2018, over 700 people across the world have submitted unique, hand-stitched contributions. This exhibition marks the first time the work will be on display in New York. As a call to action, Weymar and Lingua Franca invite the public to participate by contributing a work to the series, which will enter the Tiny Pricks public archive. 

Tiny Pricks Projects holds a creative, accessible and cathartic space during a tumultuous political climate. The series counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, other social media, and Trump’s statements by utilizing vintage textiles as a memory making timeline. Weymar references the key role embroidery played in the women’s suffrage movement, and notes it is symbolic of warmth, comfort, craft, civility, care, and a shared history. 

“This project is about witnessing, recording, taking note in thread, and paying attention,” said Weymar. The purpose is to empower people with something they've made themselves, and to reclaim the humanity that we're struggling up against.” 

“Diana’s work and the organic network that Tiny Pricks Projects ignited serves as a quiet yet poignant form of resistance,” said Lingua Franca’s Rachelle Hruska MacPherson. “I’m thrilled to showcase this work at our shop and hope it helps us bear witness to this unprecedented political moment, and remind us of the power of language.”  

Concurrent to the exhibition, a series of limited-edition Tiny Pricks t-shirts made from recycled plastic and cotton will be available for sale at the Lingua Franca shop. Insert further details here. 

Diana Weymar is a textile artist and activist. She has worked on projects with Build Peace (Nicosia, Bogota and Zurich), the Arts Council of Princeton, the Nantucket Atheneum, the W.E.B Du Bois Center at UMass Amherst, the University of Puget Sound, The Zen Hospice Project (San Francisco), the Peddie School, Open Arts Space (Damascus, Syria), Trans Tipping Point Project (Victoria, BC), New York Textile Month, the Textile Arts Center (Brooklyn, NY), and The Wing (NYC). She has exhibited her work in both Canada and the United States. Interwoven Stories and Tiny Pricks Project, both international projects, are open for public participation.

Lingua Franca is a line of sustainably-sourced, fair trade luxury cashmere sweaters, all hand-stitched by women in NYC. Founded by Rachelle Hruska MacPherson, Lingua Franca serves as a platform to inspire change – a portion of LF proceeds support activists and organizations who are working for a better world. 

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Jun
20
to Sep 29

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

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Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is the first New York retrospective in forty years to focus on the legendary couturier. Drawn primarily from Pierre Cardin’s archive, the exhibition traverses the designer’s decades-long career at the forefront of fashion invention. Known today for his bold, futuristic looks of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, Cardin extended his design concepts from fashion to furniture, industrial design, and beyond.

The exhibition presents over 170 objects drawn from his atelier and archive, including historical and contemporary haute couture, prêt-à-porter, trademark accessories, “couture” furniture, lighting, fashion sketches, personal photographs, and excerpts from television, documentaries, and feature films. The objects are displayed in an immersive environment inspired by Cardin’s unique atelier designs, showrooms, and homes.

Highlights of Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion include rare designs in luxury fabrics from the 1950s; a large grouping from the landmark 1964 “Cosmocorps” collection, which sought to streamline menswear by eliminating excessive detailing; creations that incorporate vinyls, plastics, and the self-named Cardine synthetic fabric; signature unisex ensembles featuring full knit bodysuits with layered skirts, vests, bibs, and jewelry; iconic broad-shouldered jackets from the 1980s based on Japanese origami, Chinese architecture, and American football uniforms; “illuminated” jumpsuits and dresses; recent couture eveningwear; and an extensive overview of Cardin’s recently designed couture menswear.

Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion is curated and designed by Matthew Yokobosky, Senior Curator of Fashion and Material Culture, Brooklyn Museum

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Aug
7
to Sep 29

Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall

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Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall

On view at the Brooklyn Museum: Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall Commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising—a six-day clash between police and civilians ignited by a routine raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York City—and explores its profound legacy within contemporary art and visual culture today. The exhibition draws its title from the rallying words of transgender artist and activist Marsha P. Johnson, underscoring both the precariousness and the vitality of LGBTQ+ communities. The exhibition presents twenty-eight LGBTQ+ artists born after 1969 whose works grapple with the unique conditions of our political time, and question how moments become monuments. Through painting, sculpture, installation, performance, and video, these artists engage interconnected themes of revolt, commemoration, care, and desire.


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Aug
8
to Jan 26

Vera Paints a Scarf

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Vera Paints a Scarf

Vera Paints a Scarf celebrates the work of artist Vera Neumann (1907-1993) and her contributions to the field of American design. Neumann was among the most successful female design entrepreneurs of the 20th century, and an originator of the American lifestyle brand. Over the course of her career, which spanned from her label’s debut in 1942 to her death in 1993, Neumann produced an iconic line of women's scarves all signed with a cursive “Vera” and stamped with a ladybug, as well as thousands of textile patterns based on her drawings, paintings, and collages. This exhibition will be the first to comprehensively examine her career—and highlights the keys to her success: her joyful and inventive aesthetic, democratic design ethos, fusion of craft and mass production, and clever marketing.

Telling the story of the artist behind the Vera brand, Vera Paints a Scarf  will offer a selection of paintings produced in Neumann’s preferred technique, Japanese sumi-e (ink painting), from which her textile designs derive. The exhibition will then continue with a broad exploration of her design work through over two hundred objects from her lines for the home and women’s fashion produced between 1950 and 1980, including original works on paper, textiles and garments, archival photographs and video, as well as the ephemera related to the company’s marketing campaigns, which ingeniously used the tagline “Vera paints” to promote her mass-market label.

Vera Paints a Scarf: The Art and Design of Vera Neumann is curated by Elissa Auther, MAD’s Windgate Research and Collections Curator with the support of Curatorial Assistant Alida Jekabson. Additional support was provided by Rachael Schwabe and George Tiger Liu.

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Aug
25
to Sep 27

“Stitching Boundaries : The Topography of Living”

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“Stitching Boundaries : The Topography of Living


A collaboration by Ged Merino and Aze Ong both working with textiles "The GedAze Project" creating an interactive and immersive installation of an imaginary map using crochet, knotting and repurposed textiles incorporating photo images of "Places-Objects-Relationships-Memories via a participatory process through social media.
A performance by Aze Ong using her crocheted installations will activate the opening exhibit

"Stitching Boundaries" is made possible by the Queens Council of The Arts from The New York City City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council
with support from the Drawing Room Contemporary Art

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Sep
1
to Sep 30

Dosa Inc flyingfishprojects

  • Varick Street New York NY 10013 United States (map)
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flyingfishprojects Christina Kim’s new area of work, one that I have been thinking about for a while. She see it as an extension of dosa but with a focus on individual pieces, limited series, and installations, made at different scales and more fully considered. 

Christina Kim hopes to use my hands more while continuing to collaborate with artisans and artists. her intention is to make work that engages visually and tactilely to communicate ideas, stories, or a point of view. The projects will emphasize work made by hand, guided by intuition, focused on the edges as much as the whole, informed by the process of making, and open to chance and change. She sees flyingfishprojects as non-categorical work, existing somewhere between my design practice and my interest in making art. I will continue with dosa's ethos of making work that is organic, recycled, and off the grid; maintaining a goal of zero waste; and always trying to think outside the box.

The first flyingfishproject, "desert flora from moorten botanical garden in palm springs," are translations, in appliqué and embroidery, of nine sketches made at the garden in 2018. The handwork was done at Devi studio in Kolkata, India, using leftover Jamdani fabric. She was introduced to Moorten while preparing for the exhibit “Scraps” at the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center. Charmed by the plants and drawn to the spirit and whimsy of the place, I made repeated joy-filled excursions there. 

By appointment only: asaka@dosainc.com , 212 431 1733

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Sep
3
to Sep 30

A Milliner's Studio: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

  • 215 West 38th Street, New York, NY 10018 United States (map)
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A Milliner's Studio: Handmade Hats by the Milliners Guild

To celebrate NY Textile Month, the Milliners Guild will have hats on display in the Garment Center’s 38th Street window, sponsored by the Garment District Alliance. The space will be designed as a vignette of a milliner’s studio with hats displayed throughout.

The Milliners Guild is comprised of professional hat makers from around the US. This exhibition will showcase the designs of 24 Guild members, each creating a Fall hat using using our Guild brand colors. There will be a range of innovative millinery techniques and beautiful textiles including fur felts, silk, leather and wool.

Please stop by the window and take a look when you visit the Garment District during Textile Month.

The Milliners Guild is a non-profit organization committed to increasing the public profile of millinery as well as the public's awareness and interest in millinery products. Through a collective website, special events and educational seminars the Guild provides communication about this thriving and contemporary industry to the public, press and students of the craft.

Participating milliners include:
Linda Ashton (NY), Kathy Anderson (NY), Laura Moser (KY), Ellen Christine (NY), Evetta Petty (NY), Wanda Chambers (NY), Katie Props-Allen (NC), Jennifer Hoertz (NY), Lisa McFadden (NY), Sally Caswell (NY), Amy Fowler (CA), Judith Solodkin (NY), Sheree Tams (NY), Laura Del Villaggio (TX), Barbara Volker (NY), Kim Fraser (NC), Monika Stebbins (NJ), Amina Hood (MO) Lisa Shaub (NY), Michael McCants (NY), Maria Koruz (NY), June Gumbel (NY), Maria Etkind (LA), Karen Morris (MN)


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Sep
4
to Sep 18

In process: A textile story, by Tanu Vasu

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In process: A textile story, by Tanu Vasu


Tanu Vasu explores the creation of hybrid forms which equate innovation with artisanal practice. Her work proposes altered realities of garments through arrangements of abstract textile formations, presenting an illusion of 'subversive sculpture'. 

Her design practice is built as an exploration of the fragility of textiles and a cyclical reflection to resist definition. This revealed how the intersection of technology and clothing establishes a component of elusiveness through upending conventional notions of clothing.

This installation at The Canvas depicts her process of creation merging old world techniques and hybrid notions, showcasing an innovative range of textiles and clothing comprising of saori weaving, laser cut textiles, and sustainable fabrics as a series of engaging forms.

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Sep
5
to Nov 27

Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive

FMoteau & Deminiere (France), 19th c. Sketch reference page Collaged Gouache and ink paintings on paper

FMoteau & Deminiere (France), 19th c. Sketch reference page Collaged Gouache and ink paintings on paper

Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive

 Kravet Inc. is known for its comprehensive archive of textile design, which documents the history of textile manufacture dating back centuries and originating from cultures across the globe. Encompassing textiles, paintings, artifacts and other historic documents, the Kravet archive is an important resource for researchers, designers and historians. For the first time, the Kravet Archive is the subject of an exhibition that presents its history and complexity for designers, design enthusiasts and visitors new to the subject alike to enjoy. More than 80 examples from this vast repository of textile design history are on view as part of Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive at the NYSID Gallery. 

“It is so exciting to share all of the wonderful treasures collected over the years with the design community,” said Ellen Kravet, Chairman, Board of Trustees, NYSID. “The New York School of Interior Design is the perfect organization to partner with on this endeavor offering an exclusive glimpse into the rich history of the textile world. We hope these incredible materials serve as a source of inspiration for the next generation of interior designers.” 

The Kravet archive, located at Kravet Inc.’s corporate headquarters in Bethpage, Long Island, is incredibly diverse—the oldest object is a Coptic textile fragment dating from 200 BC, but it also includes contemporary pieces such as recent indigo-dyed fabrics from Japan. It is drawn from around the world, with textiles originating on six continents and encompassing historical and contemporary production techniques. 

About The New York School of Interior Design 

New York School of Interior Design is a private, nonprofit college focused exclusively on interior design. The college offers certificate, undergraduate, and graduate programs for students at all stages of their careers—whether they’re just becoming familiar with the discipline, considering a career change, or looking to deepen knowledge in a particular area. Consistently ranked one of the top interior design programs in the United States, students study both residential and commercial interior design, some with specialties in sustainable design, lighting, and healthcare interiors. NYSID students enjoy a small class size and sharp focus, a great deal of personal attention from dedicated faculty, and they go on to practice at the highest levels of the profession. To learn more, visit NYSID.edu. 

About Kravet Inc. 

Kravet Inc., established in 1918, is the industry leader in to-the-trade home furnishings. This fifth generation family business distributes fabrics, furniture, wall coverings, trimmings, carpets and accessories. The family's commitment to innovation has helped the company transform from a small fabric house to a global leader, representing brands and designers from all over the world. In 2015, Kravet Inc. introduced curatedkravet.com, a to-the-trade only e-commerce site offering designers unique furniture and accessories curated from around the globe. Kravet Inc. owns Kravet, Lee Jofa, Groundworks, GP & J Baker and Brunschwig & Fils, all high-end fabric houses that specialize in style, luxury and exceptional design. With locations in North America and worldwide, Kravet Inc. offers the highest level of customer service, quality products and web technology for today's design professional. For further brand information, please refer to kravet.com. 

For more information or questions please email rsvp@nysid.edu or call 212-472-1500, ext. 405

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Sep
7
to Sep 30

M.PATMOS hosting Molly Haynes

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Please join in welcoming artist, Molly Haynes, as the premiere fall artist at the M.PATMOS space in Boerum Hill. Molly Haynes is a Brooklyn-based textile artist pursuing weaving as a form of sculpture through a language of controlled yet expressive materials.

She experiments within the restrictions of a loom to weave layered compositions which, when hung on the walls or in space, reflect a sense of awe one may feel when witnessing natural phenomena intersecting with the built environment.

Hefty materials, oftentimes humble and unexpected, dictate the final form of each piece. Sisal twine, salvaged marine rope, cotton clothes line, and mill-end wools make for enlivened surfaces, yet abide by the strict control of the weave structure and austere color palette. The material becomes a physical marker of place and time.

Each weft is manually inserted row by row on a warp of carefully organized threads. After weaving, certain materials such as the sisal twine distort and curve as they absorb moisture in the air, resulting in an undulating form which does not want to be tamed into a flat wall hanging. Through embracing the materials’ difficult nature, the piece gains a spirit of its own. The sisal is oftentimes untwisted to reveal the inner character of the plant fiber, resulting in a burst of fringe. Such bursts and distortions activate space in the same way marsh grasses blow in the wind or the burl of a tree might grow through a fence. We are constantly observing sublime acts of natural force—large and small. The weavings become controlled landscapes which embody the sensory events.

Sustainable modular design, eco-friendly solutions.

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Sep
10
to Oct 19

Anni Albers at David Zwirner

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Anni Albers at David Zwirner

 David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of work by Anni Albers at the gallery’s 537 West 20th Street location in New York. Organized by Brenda Danilowitz, Chief Curator at The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, this will be Albers’s first solo exhibition in New York since her 2000 retrospective at The Jewish Museum. Spanning the artist’s decades-long career, the works on view combine a deep and intuitive understanding of materials and process with her inventive and visually engaging exploration of form and color as a language in their own right.

Following recent showings of her work in Europe at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in 2017 and the widely acclaimed 2018–2019 retrospective at the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, and Tate Modern, London, and coinciding with the centennial anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus, this exhibition will provide American audiences with a rare opportunity to experience the breadth of Albers’s body of work.

The exhibition will focus primarily on the works Albers made following her move to the United States in 1933, including her pioneering wall hangings, weavings, public commissions, and a range of her works on paper. On view will be one rarely seen cotton and silk wall hanging from prior to this period, made in 1924 during Albers’s time at the Bauhaus, that manifests an intricate relationship between warp and weft and reveals the beginning of her engagement with weaving as a “many-sided practice.” Subsequent works including With Verticals (1946)—one of Albers’s largest weavings—are even more complex in their composition, utilizing ordered but irregular patterning that is of a high degree of difficulty to achieve on a loom. Likewise, in Black-White-Gold I and Black-White-Gold II (both 1950)—reunited here for the first time since the 1950s—Albers uses a supplemental thread to mimic the look of embroidery and create an intricate pattern evocative of a kind of handwriting. On loan from the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, In Orbit (1957) is a prime example of Albers’s pictorial weavings of the 1950s, integrating circular forms reminiscent of planets or satellites within an otherwise geometrically regular composition. This work underscores the slippage between abstraction and figuration within Albers’s practice—her work invokes the modernist grid while questioning its emphasis on formal reduction by presenting a composition that luminously shifts into three dimensions.

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Sep
11
to Sep 23

Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

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Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

Lost/Found is the culminating exhibition of the 10th cycle of the Textile Arts Center's Artists in Residence (TAC-AIR) , on view from 12-24 September 2019 in the TAC Project Space at the Textile Arts Center.

We are living through wild times. When there’s so much being lost, our personal becomes political, and political becomes personal.

In “Lost/Found”, a large scale tapestry tells a story of the stranglehold of addiction; the tailored shirt is enlarged, warped, and dismantled, commenting on gender normativity and patriarchal oppression; used garments gain new identities in the form of painterly compositions. An installation of prints playfully explores the idea of “cuteness” and its relation with consumption in a post-internet society; body-centric modular fabric structures propose new solutions for intimacy in domestic spaces. Flesh like knitted forms hang heavily in tension reminding us of the emotional and political challenges women still face in the context of an unwanted pregnancy. A collection of hand knitted and woven works inspired by textile traditions, motherhood and inherited legacies provides a vision of intergenerational dialogue and collaboration. A dinner party table setting incites revolution.

The work featured in Lost/Found results of nine months of questioning and reflection, throughout which the eight artists used textiles to voice their truth, reconnect with their collective history and, collaboratively, find new narratives of empowerment.

Artists in “Lost/Found” are Romina Chuls, Dance Doyle, Familien Iglesias, Tiantian Lou, Erin Palumbo, Noah Pica, Winnie van der Rijn and Shihui Zhou.

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Sep
12
to Feb 23

The World of Anna Sui

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The World of Anna Sui

Born and raised in Detroit, educated and discovered in New York, Anna Sui reinvented pop culture fashion with her signature rock-and-roll romantic label in the 1990s and has remained a design icon ever since. Beginning with her premiere catwalk show in 1991, Sui has shaped not only the garments, textiles, accessories, cosmetics, and interiors that comprise her design universe, but also the course of fashion history by popularizing the boutique fashion look. Sui’s unique approach to creating narratives through her work is legendary: a self-taught historian of culture, art, and fashion, she samples music, books, exhibitions, movies, time periods, photography, and art movements in her designs.

Over the years, Sui has explored wide-ranging materials and inspirations, including papier-mâché mannequin heads; linens by Vera; Claire McCardell sportswear; army surplus jackets; Japanese hankies; qipao dresses; wood-soled platforms from Goody Two-Shoes; the style of Jane Holzer, Zandra Rhodes, and Anita Pallenberg; and Minnie Mouse. Her collections are replete with references, processed and creatively reimagined through the filter of Anna Sui.

Unlike other popular American designers, Sui is driven by telling stories head-to-toe about the worlds of cowgirls, grunge girls, hippie chicks, hula girls, Mods, pirate rock stars, Pre-Raphaelite maidens, and surfer nomads. The exhibition gives insights into her process, allowing the viewer to step inside her imagination and watch it unfold.

The World of Anna Sui features approximately one-hundred looks from the designer’s archive, presenting a roll call of twelve archetypes that are staples of the Sui aesthetic. It also spotlights her heroes as a youth and the importance of her collaborators, including the New York City Garment Center.

The first iteration of this exhibition debuted at the Fashion and Textile Museum, London, in the summer of 2017.

The World of Anna Sui was curated by Dennis Nothdruft for the Fashion and Textile Museum, London. It was secured for the Museum of Arts and Design by former William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator Shannon R. Stratton and adapted for the New York audience by Assistant Curator Barbara Paris Gifford.

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Sep
12
to Nov 1

Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures

Vagrancies Rules (detail) , 2019, Mixed media, 74 x 158 x 3 in. courtesy of Geary & the artist

Vagrancies Rules (detail), 2019, Mixed media, 74 x 158 x 3 in. courtesy of Geary & the artist

Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures

Geary is pleased to present Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures. Woods is showing works on paper for the first time and Vagrancies Rules, a 13’ long free-standing textile, is reconfigured in response to the architectural elements of the gallery. The small weavings in the series, of or related to, are made on a rudimentary portable loom.  Felt Around Federal Standard 33538 is a large scale felted wool installation that makes specific use of Geary’s windowed view of a highly regulated public space to consider color, the history and properties of felt, and the standardization of the movement of bodies.

Kristine Woods (1964 Chicago) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Recent shows include Such Is, a solo exhibition curated by Janice Guy at MBnb, NYC, New York (2019), Regarding & Regardless, a solo exhibition at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (2018), and The Portrait is Political, a group exhibition curated by Liz Collins at BRIC, Brooklyn, New York (2019). Woods spent the fall of 2018 in residency at Textilsetur Islands (Blonduos, Iceland), and is a recipient of a Creative Capital Artists Grant. Kristine Woods earned an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is full time faculty at The Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work will be included in a two-person presentation by Geary in NADA’s inaugural Chicago Invitational. This is Woods’ first solo exhibition at the gallery.

On view September 12-November 1, Open hours Tuesday through Saturday, 11-6, and by appointment

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Sep
15
to Sep 30

The Gold Coast Arts Center Is Proud To Present Our September Exhibition: Warp & Woof

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The Gold Coast Arts Center Is Proud To Present Our September Exhibition: Warp & Woof, Curated By Gallery Director, Jude Amsel

Taking its title from the weaving terms “warp” (the vertical and static component of the weave) and “woof” (the dynamic and horizontal aspect of the weave), this exhibition looks at both conventional and unconventional approaches to weaving.

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Sep
16
to Sep 20

Material ConneXion Opens To The Public

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Material ConneXion Opens To The Public

Leading Materials-Driven Platform Announces Partnership with New York Textile Month in honor of this September’s festival. Material ConneXion, the leading materials-driven resource and partner to the most innovative brands in the world will open their library headquarters to the public for a week of self-guided tours and exciting material inspiration.

Located at the heart of Midtown, the New York library is home to over 2,000 physical material and process samples from around the world. Otherwise accessible only to Material ConneXion members, the library will host several visitors during the week of September 16th -20th 2019.

Material ConneXion’s partnership with New York Textile Month marks the first occasion where the library will be open to the public. Material ConneXion (materialconnexion.com), a SANDOW company, is a global materials and innovation platform that connects clients with over 10,000 materials and technologies to help create the products and services of tomorrow. Material ConneXion is the trusted advisor to Fortune 500 companies, as well as forward thinking agencies and government entities. With locations in Bangkok, Bilbao, Daegu, Milan, New York, Skövde, Tokyo, and North Carolina, Material ConneXion’s international network of specialists provides a global, cross industry perspective on materials, design, new product development, sustainability, and innovation.

To reserve a date at the library, or to learn more, visit Materialconnexion.com

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Sep
17
to Sep 26

Special Exhibit: HBF Textiles + Elodie Blanchard

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Special Exhibit: HBF Textiles + Elodie Blanchard

HBF Textiles and designer Elodie Blanchard will present a special exhibit of Blanchard's unique textile art opening night Wednesday, September 25 from 5:30-8:00 at the HBF& HBF Textiles showroom. Blanchard began designing clothes and organizing fashion shows in her teens before moving to Paris to study sculpture at the École des Beaux-Arts and fashion at the Duperré School of Design and Fashion. In 1999, she won the young designer prize at the International Fashion Arts Festival of Hyeres, which gave her the opportunity to sell her eponymous clothing line at the famed French La Redoute store. After studying at CalArts in Los Angeles, her interests expanded to performance projects, including collaborations with musicians and dancers. Later, Blanchard delved into a variety of endeavors including prototype product development, trend forecasting, special event design, and costume and set design. She has also taught at Parsons in NY. She is the founder of Elodie Blanchard Studio specializing in textile design and fabrication. Her aesthetic is modern and whimsical: each unique piece showcases her ability to take everyday objects - an heirloom quilt, a utilitarian moving blanket, a favorite pair of pants - and transform them into extraordinary textiles with diverse design applications.


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Sep
20
9:30 AM09:30

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Textile Conservation Colloquium: Recent Research

  • The Met Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall, Uris Center for Education (map)
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art Textile Conservation Colloquium: Recent Research

“Gain an inside perspective on the fascinating work of The Met’s Department of Textile Conservation. From investigating silk production in Japan and block printing in India to conserving precious tapestries and exploring applications for new technologies, conservators share their research and discoveries from the past year. To further highlight the broad scope of the department’s interests, the colloquium also features a presentation of traditional Indian block printing by guest artist Sufiyan Ismail Khatri, a tenth-generation artisan whose family has been involved in the art of Ajrakh printing since the fifteenth century.”

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Sep
20
to Oct 9

Construction; Molly Haynes And William Storms

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Construction; Molly Haynes And William Storms

Coming to complimentary conclusions, weavers Molly Haynes’ and William Storms’ self-expression at the loom explores contemporary form through a timeless craft. Construction showcases this investigation of woven modernity. Haynes and Storms, having both worked in the Textile Industry, use their technical experience coupled with inventive hand technique to create bodies of work that blur the lines between art, craft and industrial sensibility.

Construction comprises a crossover of tactile artworks on the wall and sculptural rugs displayed as freestanding objects in the round. While both artists retain their own personal aesthetics, the exhibit is unified by an emphasis on exaggerated woven structure and use of unconventional materials: wire, marine rope, clothesline, and deadstock yarns from the Textile Industry. The evidence of experimental hand-manipulation while on the loom is imperative to both practices, revealing the work of an artist, over that of a machine. Restricted color palettes of mainly black and white further assert the materials’ character and modern take on an ancient craft.

Please join us for the opening reception on Friday, September 20th at 6pm. Beverages will be served.

Weekdays by appointment, open Saturdays

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Sep
21
to Sep 22

Onion Society, Fragmentario

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Onion Society

Onion Society presents work from an international and multi-disciplinary group who seek to explore, through the lens of onions, themselves and their cultures.

Using onion skins for color, Liuxu Luo (China), Terumi Saito (Japan), Tess Murdoch (U.S.A.) and Samyukta Easwaran (India), developed original textile and audiovisual work, exploring their own voice through onions, as citizens from countries that dominate the international onion marketplace.

By contrast, audio compilations by Michele Condò (Italy) and Martina Bruni (Italy), imagine the sound of southern Italian onions. Reflecting on the soft power of Italy in the onion landscape, where it cemented an onion brand identity, without being a major producer of the crop.

Onion Society was inspired by the travels of María Elena Pombo (Venezuela), curator of the show, to the south of Italy and the esteem shown by the Calabrian people for their local Tropea onion, the protagonist of different events she has organized there at La Guarimba Film Festival.

Onion Society will be shown in New York during New York Textile Month on September 21st and 22nd at Issue 00 in 41 Varick Ave. in Brooklyn.

The name of the project is a wink to the cosmopolitan and creative lifestyle of the Café Society from the early 20th century.


María Elena Pombo / Fragmentario

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Sep
21
6:00 PM18:00

Revolution Dinner Party: Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

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Revolution Dinner Party: Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

Lost/Found is the culminating exhibition of the 10th cycle of the Textile Arts Center's Artists in Residence (TAC-AIR) , on view from 12-24 September 2019 in the TAC Project Space at the Textile Arts Center.

We are living through wild times. When there’s so much being lost, our personal becomes political, and political becomes personal.

In “Lost/Found”, a large scale tapestry tells a story of the stranglehold of addiction; the tailored shirt is enlarged, warped, and dismantled, commenting on gender normativity and patriarchal oppression; used garments gain new identities in the form of painterly compositions. An installation of prints playfully explores the idea of “cuteness” and its relation with consumption in a post-internet society; body-centric modular fabric structures propose new solutions for intimacy in domestic spaces. Flesh like knitted forms hang heavily in tension reminding us of the emotional and political challenges women still face in the context of an unwanted pregnancy. A collection of hand knitted and woven works inspired by textile traditions, motherhood and inherited legacies provides a vision of intergenerational dialogue and collaboration. A dinner party table setting incites revolution.

The work featured in Lost/Found results of nine months of questioning and reflection, throughout which the eight artists used textiles to voice their truth, reconnect with their collective history and, collaboratively, find new narratives of empowerment.

Artists in “Lost/Found” are Romina Chuls, Dance Doyle, Familien Iglesias, Tiantian Lou, Erin Palumbo, Noah Pica, Winnie van der Rijn and Shihui Zhou.

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Sep
22
5:00 PM17:00

Artist Talk: Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

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Artist Talk: Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

Lost/Found is the culminating exhibition of the 10th cycle of the Textile Arts Center's Artists in Residence (TAC-AIR) , on view from 12-24 September 2019 in the TAC Project Space at the Textile Arts Center.

We are living through wild times. When there’s so much being lost, our personal becomes political, and political becomes personal.

In “Lost/Found”, a large scale tapestry tells a story of the stranglehold of addiction; the tailored shirt is enlarged, warped, and dismantled, commenting on gender normativity and patriarchal oppression; used garments gain new identities in the form of painterly compositions. An installation of prints playfully explores the idea of “cuteness” and its relation with consumption in a post-internet society; body-centric modular fabric structures propose new solutions for intimacy in domestic spaces. Flesh like knitted forms hang heavily in tension reminding us of the emotional and political challenges women still face in the context of an unwanted pregnancy. A collection of hand knitted and woven works inspired by textile traditions, motherhood and inherited legacies provides a vision of intergenerational dialogue and collaboration. A dinner party table setting incites revolution.

The work featured in Lost/Found results of nine months of questioning and reflection, throughout which the eight artists used textiles to voice their truth, reconnect with their collective history and, collaboratively, find new narratives of empowerment.

Artists in “Lost/Found” are Romina Chuls, Dance Doyle, Familien Iglesias, Tiantian Lou, Erin Palumbo, Noah Pica, Winnie van der Rijn and Shihui Zhou.

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Sep
23
10:00 AM10:00

Talent! exhibit showcasing the finalists for the Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

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Talent! exhibit showcasing the finalists for the Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Mohawk proudly sponsors this prize to support emerging textile designers

Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort and fellow curator Philip Fimmano are pleased to announce the creation of a new international design prize to be awarded to a textile or fashion design student who exhibits innovative thinking and inspiring creativity in textiles.

The Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize honors Dorothy Waxman, the original driving force behind Trend Union and EDELKOORT INC. in the United States and contributing reporter to the magazines View on Colour, Textile View and Viewpoint. Waxman’s insatiable curiosity and discerning eye for the avant-garde has inspired Edelkoort and her team for decades. Waxman also introduced the American fashion industry to European textile partners with her work at the Fashion Group. As an avid textile aficionado, she believes that creative fabrics can change the design landscape in profound ways.

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Sep
23
10:45 AM10:45

String Yarns: Cooper Hewitt Exhibit Private Tour and Special Shopping Event

  • Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum (map)
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String Yarns: Cooper Hewitt Exhibit Private Tour and Special Shopping Event 

Join Stacy Charles and Lisa Hoffman for a special day of design and culture at the Cooper Hewitt Museum’s “Nature by Design” exhibit. Attendees will be taken for a private tour through this extraordinary juxtaposition of naturally occurring patterns that influence design in all forms. Throughout history, designers have observed nature, investigated its materials, and imitated and abstracted its patterns and shapes. Textiles, jewelry, furniture, cutlery, and more show how designers have interpreted nature’s rich beauty and astonishing complexity. Across scales from microscopic to monumental and in forms familiar and unusual, tour guests will be invited to discover how nature and design have intersected in the past and continue to converge in our world.

After this fascinating walk through the inspiration of nature, a boxed lunch will be provided and if weather permits, guests are welcome to eat in the calming garden at the Cooper Hewitt Museum. Attendees are also welcome to eat inside the museum; if you’d like to take your lunch to String Yarns, we’ll be waiting with open arms!

After lunch, everyone will meet at String to enjoy a special event day discount for shopping to satisfy the inspiration you got from our morning at the museum, and the day wouldn’t be complete without a special souvenir gift for all who can join us. 


Details: 

Monday, September 23, 2019

Meet at the Cooper Hewitt at 10:45am

Tour begins at 11:00am until about 11:45am.  

$75 per person (includes private tour, lunch, and souvenir gift)

Guests will enjoy a special discount at String for the event day

Please call String 212-288-9276 or email info@stringyarns.com

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Sep
25
to Oct 25

Meet + Greet with Elodie Blanchard: HBF Textiles

  • HBF & HBF Textiles Showroom (map)
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Meet + Greet with Elodie Blanchard: HBF Textiles

HBF Textiles and designer Elodie Blanchard will present a special exhibit of Blanchard's unique textile art opening night Wednesday, September 25 from 5:30-8:00 at the HBF& HBF Textiles showroom. Blanchard began designing clothes and organizing fashion shows in her teens before moving to Paris to study sculpture at the École des Beaux-Arts and fashion at the Duperré School of Design and Fashion. In 1999, she won the young designer prize at the International Fashion Arts Festival of Hyeres, which gave her the opportunity to sell her eponymous clothing line at the famed French La Redoute store. After studying at CalArts in Los Angeles, her interests expanded to performance projects, including collaborations with musicians and dancers. Later, Blanchard delved into a variety of endeavors including prototype product development, trend forecasting, special event design, and costume and set design. She has also taught at Parsons in NY. She is the founder of Elodie Blanchard Studio specializing in textile design and fabrication. Her aesthetic is modern and whimsical: each unique piece showcases her ability to take everyday objects - an heirloom quilt, a utilitarian moving blanket, a favorite pair of pants - and transform them into extraordinary textiles with diverse design applications.


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Sep
25
to Oct 2

Urban Zen: MONU'IA, a journey by Tiago Valente Opening and special screening

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Urban Zen: MONU'IA, a journey by Tiago Valente Opening and special screening

Please join us at Urban Zen for the presentation of the project MONU’IA, textile installation and documentary by Tiago Valente, followed by a special screening and discussion with the artist .

MONU’IA tells an intimate story of a life changing journey by Tiago Valente, a multidisciplinary artist and researcher, who travels through the islands of the South Pacific Ocean, to coexist with different ethnic groups on Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Fiji and Vanuatu.

For this particular project, Valente spent two months in the islands of Vanuatu, living with four different tribal groups. Each one presenting a specific level of exposure to what we understand now as modern civilization. The initial object of this study was to observe and understand the impact of this phenomenon and how this affected these groups’ interactions with the modern world.

Following a last minute strike of intuition, Valente decided to bring with himself one of his textile installations, with no clear further intentions. He decided to display his installation in these villages, to observe and document their reactions to the work, as part of his study. 

This entire experience changed him forever. Not only it exceeded his initial expectations about social studies, but his entire life and understanding of the human core of connection.

Opening and special screening; September 25th, 6-8 pm

Tiago Valente is a multidisciplinary artist, designer, thinker and professor.

Following a holistic approach, he draws from Anthropology and explores activism and sociological issues with his work. The theatrical magic in his creative universe is unveiled through a variety of mediums, crafted with extreme attention to detail, merging artisanal techniques with the latest technologies. Valente articulates unique narratives through architectural installations and even wearable sculptures. 

Relevant projects include immersive multi sensory experiences at unexpected public spaces to challenge the perception of the viewer that may choose - or not - to be part of such encounters.

His award winning work has been showcased internationally in a rich contrast of cultures. Most recently, he has been invited to present his work at The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, in the context of Bilbao Bizkaia Design Week in the fall of 2019.

Lives and works in New York.

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Sep
26
to Oct 3

Textiles Revealed: BELGIUM IS DESIGN in collaboration NYTM

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Textiles Revealed: BELGIUM IS DESIGN in collaboration NYTM

Belgium is Design is pleased to present TEXTILES REVEALED, introducing the work of 11 contemporary Belgian textile designers to an American audience. As part of the fourth annual New York Textile Month, the exhibition is curated by Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano.

Education, material knowledge, research, innovation, technology and production methods, not to mention ecological, ethical and social awareness, are all reflected in TEXTILES REVEALED. The works on show range from imposing installations and sustainable furniture to instinctive wallhangings and textural rugs. As Edelkoort explains, “ The exhibition upends preconceived notions of traditional Belgian textiles – often limited to the country’s centuries-old linen heritage – instead unraveling an exciting thread among designers from the region. Tufting, felting, digital jacquards and coiling are just some of the techniques employed by a new generation redefining the boundaries of textile creativity. ”

New York Textile Month represents the ideal showcase for such creativity. From unique collectible pieces to commissioned interior works, textiles are very much a part of contemporary Belgian design.

Although regularly exhibiting at leading design events in Europe, TEXTILES REVEALED is Belgium is Design’s first venture in the United States and the first time it has focused exclusively on textiles. The event offers great opportunities for the selected artists and designers to connect with the America’s dynamic galleries, collectors, interior architects and designers.

ALICE LEENS

Alice Leens graduated in textile design from the prestigious La Cambre arts school in Brussels three years ago and has since taken part in both group exhibitions and solo shows. Experimental in style and approach, Leens focuses on the essence of textiles: the thread. The foundation of all textile production, her work frees the thread from its utilitarian role and encourages the viewer to(re)discover the beauty in the banal and its infinite possibilities.

BEDROSSIAN SERVAES

Flavien Servaes and Ani Bedrossian are both graduates of the prestigious ENSAV La Cambre School in Brussels. Their textiles are research-driven and experimental, intimately linked to the tangible ways in which the works develop. It is an approach embedded in not only the very structure of the thread, its movements and intertwining, but also to the carefully thought out mutations of the material and the tools that bring them to life.

CHEVALIER MASSON AND DIANE STEVERLYNCK

Radical and innovative, Anne Masson and Eric Chevalier have collaborated since 2006. Their work explores an array of ways to design textiles, from the raw material to the finished product via the transformation of what is considered waste. This direction takes on many forms: be it the yarn, pattern, function, structure or texture of a specific shape. They create self-edited products, and also work on projects associated with architects, designers, choreographers and fashion designers. In 2014 they founded the project Laend together with the designer Diane Steverlynck, exploring how a rhythm or a chromatic sequence in the thread produces repercussions in the designs and motifs of the fabric that they compose. Diane Steverlynck follows a personal approach centred on objects and textiles. Her work focuses on researching textiles, materials and structures and their influence on the use and identity of everyday objects.

CHRISTOPH HEFTI

Textile designer and artist Christoph Hefti divides his time between Brussels, Zurich, Paris and Stockholm. Parallel to a career in fashion textiles and print, Hefti is also active in the performing arts, where he combines music, costume design, video and live art. His love for crafted textiles has taken him to Nepal, where he designs and develops his own series of hand-knotted rugs. Fascinated by the use of traditional crafts in a contemporary context, he approaches the mystical and even spiritual tradition of storytelling textiles through very personal yet worldly themes.

DE CLUUZ BY L UC DRUEZ

DeCluuz is the latest project by textile research consultant Luc Druez. As seen in the exhibition, he has created a series of female portraits, their images embodied in an intertwining of technical fibers and metallic filaments. In these large-scale tapestries, DeCluuz invites us to exchange glances with these young ‘ladies of metal’ and proposes a bridge between the technical appropriation of unexpected fibers (electrical wires, fishing wires, etc.) and the time-honored heritage of weaving.

GENEVIEVE LEVIVIER

After spending ten years creating textiles for leading fashion houses such as Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier and Balenciaga, today Geneviève Levivier devotes her time to contemporary tapestries. These works are made with a philosophy of slow and sensorial design, combining craftsmanship with innovative technologies to constantly renew the language of textile art.

KRJST STUDIO

The skills and vivid imaginations of Justine de Moriamé and Erika Schillebeeckx come together as KRJST. Their dramatic tapestries question the relationship between tradition and technology and reflect an emotional mapping in response to the world we live in. Boundary pushers in all senses, contemporary social, political and environmental contexts are translated into often turbulent visions of hanging gardens and incandescent vegetation– pathways to understanding both conflict and beauty.

BELGIUM IS DESIGN

The Belgian organization for the promotion of design,Wallonie-Bruxelles Design Mode (WBDM), has been working since 2007 to promote Belgian design under the Belgium is Design campaign. Through marketing and promotion activities, Belgium is Design has brought together groups of young talents and established companies at prestigious trade shows such as Maison&Objet in Paris, Milan Design Week, Business of Design Week in Hong Kong and the Stockholm Furniture Fair.

Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano curate contemporary design exhibitions for international institutions. In 2011, they co-founded Talking Textiles, an ongoing initiative to promote awareness and innovation in textiles through touring shows, publications and educational programs. Their exhibitions have appeared at Artipelag (Stockholm), Arnhem Mode Biennale, Design Museum Holon, Gaîté Lyrique (Paris), Museum of Contemporary Design & Applied Arts (Lausanne), Museum of Architecture (Moscow), Textiel Museum (Tilburg), TRAPHOLT (Denmark) and 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT (Tokyo).

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Sep
26
10:00 AM10:00

A rare glimpse of exclusive textile designers at Cristina Grajales Gallery

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A rare glimpse of exclusive textile designers at Cristina Grajales Gallery

The practice of weaving and creating textiles is at best one meticulously planned down to the color, shape, and pattern and better yet something that evolves as the designer weaves and bends the piece to meet the reality of its creator's dreams. This relation between organic and inorganic forms of control when designing textiles, breeds the most beautiful results. Varying combinations of planning and improvisation does not guarantee successful textiles but carries the potential, when navigated by a master, to produce works under the most exceptional and extraordinary circumstances. Cristina Grajales Gallery has the pleasure of presenting designers on both the median and polar sides of the meticulous-reactionary-spectrum. Our designers vary in strategy and even more so in medium, from Hechizoo who weaves in metals and polymers, Madeline Weinrib who takes traditional methods to whole new painterly level, Betil Dagdelin who builds iron frames of chairs and furniture and uses them as a loom, to The Doug and Mike Starn who use bamboo and rope to weave dwellings, furniture and more. Join us in celebrating the varying manifestations of textiles and the masters who create them.

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Sep
26
to Dec 18

A special tour for NYTM : Copy of Pattern and Process, Selections from the Kravet Archive

FMoteau & Deminiere (France), 19th c. Sketch reference page Collaged Gouache and ink paintings on paper

FMoteau & Deminiere (France), 19th c. Sketch reference page Collaged Gouache and ink paintings on paper

A special tour for NYTM : Pattern and Process, Selections from the Kravet Archive

 Kravet Inc. is known for its comprehensive archive of textile design, which documents the history of textile manufacture dating back centuries and originating from cultures across the globe. Encompassing textiles, paintings, artifacts and other historic documents, the Kravet archive is an important resource for researchers, designers and historians. For the first time, the Kravet Archive is the subject of an exhibition that presents its history and complexity for designers, design enthusiasts and visitors new to the subject alike to enjoy. More than 80 examples from this vast repository of textile design history are on view as part of Pattern and Process: Selections from the Kravet Archive at the NYSID Gallery. 

“It is so exciting to share all of the wonderful treasures collected over the years with the design community,” said Ellen Kravet, Chairman, Board of Trustees, NYSID. “The New York School of Interior Design is the perfect organization to partner with on this endeavor offering an exclusive glimpse into the rich history of the textile world. We hope these incredible materials serve as a source of inspiration for the next generation of interior designers.” 

The Kravet archive, located at Kravet Inc.’s corporate headquarters in Bethpage, Long Island, is incredibly diverse—the oldest object is a Coptic textile fragment dating from 200 BC, but it also includes contemporary pieces such as recent indigo-dyed fabrics from Japan. It is drawn from around the world, with textiles originating on six continents and encompassing historical and contemporary production techniques. 

About The New York School of Interior Design 

New York School of Interior Design is a private, nonprofit college focused exclusively on interior design. The college offers certificate, undergraduate, and graduate programs for students at all stages of their careers—whether they’re just becoming familiar with the discipline, considering a career change, or looking to deepen knowledge in a particular area. Consistently ranked one of the top interior design programs in the United States, students study both residential and commercial interior design, some with specialties in sustainable design, lighting, and healthcare interiors. NYSID students enjoy a small class size and sharp focus, a great deal of personal attention from dedicated faculty, and they go on to practice at the highest levels of the profession. To learn more, visit NYSID.edu. 

About Kravet Inc. 

Kravet Inc., established in 1918, is the industry leader in to-the-trade home furnishings. This fifth generation family business distributes fabrics, furniture, wall coverings, trimmings, carpets and accessories. The family's commitment to innovation has helped the company transform from a small fabric house to a global leader, representing brands and designers from all over the world. In 2015, Kravet Inc. introduced curatedkravet.com, a to-the-trade only e-commerce site offering designers unique furniture and accessories curated from around the globe. Kravet Inc. owns Kravet, Lee Jofa, Groundworks, GP & J Baker and Brunschwig & Fils, all high-end fabric houses that specialize in style, luxury and exceptional design. With locations in North America and worldwide, Kravet Inc. offers the highest level of customer service, quality products and web technology for today's design professional. For further brand information, please refer to kravet.com. 


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Sep
27
6:30 PM18:30

“Stitching Boundaries : The Topography of Living”

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“Stitching Boundaries : The Topography of Living


A collaboration by Ged Merino and Aze Ong both working with textiles "The GedAze Project" creating an interactive and immersive installation of an imaginary map using crochet, knotting and repurposed textiles incorporating photo images of "Places-Objects-Relationships-Memories via a participatory process through social media.
A performance by Aze Ong using her crocheted installations will activate the opening exhibit

"Stitching Boundaries" is made possible by the Queens Council of The Arts from The New York City City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council
with support from the Drawing Room Contemporary Art

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Sep
14
4:00 PM16:00

Museum of Art and Design Talks | Inside Anna Sui’s World

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Museum of Art and Design Talks | Inside Anna Sui’s World

To celebrate The World of Anna Sui, her first major retrospective in the United States, Anna Sui is participating in a series of conversations at MAD with her favorite collaborators and muses. For Inside Anna Sui’s World, the fashion design icon and the exhibition’s curator Dennis Nothdruft will share behind-the-scenes stories of The World of Anna Sui in a panel discussion moderated by MAD Assistant Curator Barbara Paris Gifford.

Anna Sui presented her first fashion show in 1991 to international acclaim. The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) recognized Anna Sui with its Perry Ellis Award for New Fashion Talent in 1993, and honored her again in 2009 with the prestigious Geoffrey Beene Lifetime Achievement Award. Anna Sui’s products are sold in over 300 stores in 30 countries. Anna Sui designs and manufactures directly from her New York City studio and the Anna Sui brand has been independently owned since its inception in 1981.

Dennis Nothdruft is Curator of the Fashion and Textile Museum, London.

Barbara Paris Gifford is an Assistant Curator at MAD and adapted the exhibition for the Museum.


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Sep
13
to Sep 15

A Journey To Mount Fuji

  • 601 West 26th Street, 13th Floor New York, NY United States (map)
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A Journey To Mount Fuji

Designers & Agents are pleased to present a special exhibition as part of New York Textile Month. Staged during D&A’s spring / summer 2020 market.

A Journey to Mount Fuji brings weavers from Japan’s Yamanashi region to the United States for the first time.

Visitors to the trade show are invited to explore this unique area’s textile products, woven and manufactured by boutique mills in the foothills of Mount Fuji. The installation takes the form of an imaginary outdoor setting conjuring up the experience of Yamanashi’s foothills. The selected products reflect this journey: a linen dress for collecting flowers on a hike; a silk-cashmere scarf for a cool breezy evening; a sturdy umbrella for a sudden spring shower; textile pouches for a traveler’s toiletries and wellness products; organic cotton pajamas for an overnight stay; linen toweling for after a hot ryokan bath; and a linen-cupro blanket for an improvised picnic.

In the navy and blues synonymous with this famous volcano and its streams – accented by the optimistic brights that today’s consumers crave – the products on show recall the naïve happiness of summer travels. In addition, organic cottons, linen and cupro tell a fabric story in wholesome beige tones that connect with nature and the outdoors. Yamanashi textiles cater to international collections from Comme des Garçons to Eileen Fisher. Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort admires the weavers’ sustainable approach and philosophy: “A way of working in which humanity is present, altruism flourishes and beauty prevails; an innovative region able to continue producing cultural cloth on a human scale; created in a hospitable place where time slows down to invest energy and creativity into the making process – a path to the kind of green thinking we so desperately need.” For press information, interviews & visual assets, please contact Kaori Ieyasu: kaori@trendunion.com

This event is for fashion professionals & buyers only

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Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

Opening Reception: Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

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Opening Reception: Lost/Found, TAC AIR Cycle 10 Final Exhibition

Lost/Found is the culminating exhibition of the 10th cycle of the Textile Arts Center's Artists in Residence (TAC-AIR) , on view from 12-24 September 2019 in the TAC Project Space at the Textile Arts Center.

We are living through wild times. When there’s so much being lost, our personal becomes political, and political becomes personal.

In “Lost/Found”, a large scale tapestry tells a story of the stranglehold of addiction; the tailored shirt is enlarged, warped, and dismantled, commenting on gender normativity and patriarchal oppression; used garments gain new identities in the form of painterly compositions. An installation of prints playfully explores the idea of “cuteness” and its relation with consumption in a post-internet society; body-centric modular fabric structures propose new solutions for intimacy in domestic spaces. Flesh like knitted forms hang heavily in tension reminding us of the emotional and political challenges women still face in the context of an unwanted pregnancy. A collection of hand knitted and woven works inspired by textile traditions, motherhood and inherited legacies provides a vision of intergenerational dialogue and collaboration. A dinner party table setting incites revolution.

The work featured in Lost/Found results of nine months of questioning and reflection, throughout which the eight artists used textiles to voice their truth, reconnect with their collective history and, collaboratively, find new narratives of empowerment.

Artists in “Lost/Found” are Romina Chuls, Dance Doyle, Familien Iglesias, Tiantian Lou, Erin Palumbo, Noah Pica, Winnie van der Rijn and Shihui Zhou.

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Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

Museum of Arts and Design: Embroidered Patches with Artist-in-Residence Jennie Maydew

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Embroidered Patches with Artist-in-Residence Jennie Maydew

Join MAD artist-in-residence Jennie Maydew for a free embroidered patch workshop inspired by the exhibition The World of Anna Sui. Visitors will draw inspiration from Anna Sui's thematic archetypes such as Americana, Fairytale, Punk, and Retro as they develop and stitch a personal motif onto reclaimed fabrics. No experience is required, as Maydew will demonstrate simple embroidery stitches for visitors to apply on their patches.

Free with Pay-What-You-Wish Admission
6th floor - classroom at MAD

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Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

Opening Night : Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures

Vagrancies Rules (detail) , 2019, Mixed media, 74 x 158 x 3 in. courtesy of Geary & the artist

Vagrancies Rules (detail), 2019, Mixed media, 74 x 158 x 3 in. courtesy of Geary & the artist

Opening Night: Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures

Geary is pleased to present Sparkling or Still, Kristine Woods’ solo exhibition of weavings, prints and sculptures. Woods is showing works on paper for the first time and Vagrancies Rules, a 13’ long free-standing textile, is reconfigured in response to the architectural elements of the gallery. The small weavings in the series, of or related to, are made on a rudimentary portable loom.  Felt Around Federal Standard 33538 is a large scale felted wool installation that makes specific use of Geary’s windowed view of a highly regulated public space to consider color, the history and properties of felt, and the standardization of the movement of bodies.

Kristine Woods (1964 Chicago) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Recent shows include Such Is, a solo exhibition curated by Janice Guy at MBnb, NYC, New York (2019), Regarding & Regardless, a solo exhibition at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (2018), and The Portrait is Political, a group exhibition curated by Liz Collins at BRIC, Brooklyn, New York (2019). Woods spent the fall of 2018 in residency at Textilsetur Islands (Blonduos, Iceland), and is a recipient of a Creative Capital Artists Grant. Kristine Woods earned an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is full time faculty at The Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work will be included in a two-person presentation by Geary in NADA’s inaugural Chicago Invitational. This is Woods’ first solo exhibition at the gallery.

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Sep
3
6:00 PM18:00

“Poetry in Weaving” featuring Bangladeshi Handwoven Textiles

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Incasa presents a series of one day exhibitions honoring handmade textiles.

Please join us for an evening of “Poetry in Weaving” featuring Bangladeshi Handwoven Textiles from Hand Touch and Naarifolk.

There will be Short Talks, Special Handmade Giveways, and Toast.

Series Curated by Labiba Ali - textile scholar and founder designer of Naarifolk.

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Jun
6
to Sep 8

Diedrick Brackens: darling divined

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Diedrick Brackens: Darling Divined

For the artist’s first institutional solo exhibition in New York, Brackens presents a new installation of weavings in the New Museum’s Lobby Gallery.

Cover Image:

Diedrick Brackensthe cup is a cloud, 2018. Cotton yarn, acrylic yarn, and mirrors, 74 × 78 in (188 × 198.1 cm). Courtesy the artist

Diedrick Brackens (b. 1989, Mexia, TX) constructs intricately woven textiles that speak to the complexities of black and queer identity in the United States. Interlacing diverse traditions, including West African weaving, European tapestries, and quilting from the American south, Brackens creates cosmographic abstractions and figurative narratives that lyrically merge lived experience, commemoration, and allegory. He uses both commercial dyes and unconventional colorants such as wine, tea, and bleach, and foregrounds the loaded symbolism of materials like cotton, with its links to the transatlantic slave trade.

This exhibition is curated by Margot Norton, Curator, and Francesca Altamura, Curatorial Assistant.

Diedrick Brackens (b. 1989, Mexia, TX) lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. Recent solo exhibitions include “hearts, hands, and other members,” Conduit Gallery, Dallas (2015); “a slow reckoning,” Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University (2017); and “unholy ghosts,” Various Small Fires, Los Angeles (2019). Group exhibitions include Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; McColl Center for Art+Innovation, Charlotte; Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; Dimensions Variable, Miami; Denny Gallery, New York; Biola University, La Mirada; Patterson-Appleton Arts Center, Denton; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery; Marin Community Foundation, Novato; Work Gallery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; SOMArts, San Francisco; and the 3rd Ghetto Biennale, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Brackens was in residence at Long Beach Museum of Art in 2017, and at the Joan Michell Center in 2016.


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May
9
to Sep 8

Camp: Notes on Fashion

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Camp: Notes on Fashion

On view at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art Through more than 250 objects dating from the seventeenth century to the present, The Costume Institute's spring 2019 exhibition explores the origins of camp's exuberant aesthetic. Susan Sontag's 1964 essay "Notes on 'Camp'" provides the framework for the exhibition, which examines how the elements of irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration are expressed in fashion.

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Sep
30
to Oct 16

Run Home Collection for NYTM

The date for this event changed . The event will only open on October 5th

Susan Cianciolo and Kiva Motnyk have partnered on the 4th Run Home Collection opening September 26th in New York City at Bridget Donahue Gallery, annual traveling exhibitions and instillations that allow traditional ideas of art and design to be challenged. Run Home collection was created to explore process and collaboration, inviting artists and artisans to contribute in creating parts of the collection, as well as traveling for workshops, mentoring and building creative support. This refreshing approach to collaborative design reflects the ever-evolving spaces we live in, allowing change and growth to be effortlessly integrated into our lives. This years collaborators include professor and author of “Natural Color” Sasha Duerr, Furniture Designer Leon Ransmeier, Ceramic artist Jan Jasiu Krajewski, artist Johanna Tagda, Designer Jessica Ogden and Textile Artist Cara Marie Piazza.

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Photo by by Anna Falck

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Sep
30
3:00 PM15:00

Designer Talk for TEXTILETHINKING Exhibition

Designer Talk for TEXTILETHINKING Exhibition

Please join us Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 3:00pm for a Designer Talk lead by Pratt Institute School of Design’s Dean Anita Cooney. Dean Cooney will discuss with faculty members, Annie Coggan, Alex Goldberg, Jeannine Han and Deborah Schniederman how textiles inform and shape the Fashion and Interior Design Program’s curriculum and student work. The talk will be in the gallery at Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn and will celebrate the TEXTILETHINKING exhibition of textile work in the Pratt Institute School of Design as well as New York Textile Month.

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Sep
30
to Dec 16

Complicated Territory

Complicated Territory: Exhibition featuring Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle curated by Bridget Donlon

Alex McQuilkin, Erin M. Riley, and Martha Tuttle create work that delves into the complicated territory of a specific kind of female identity, psychology, and navigation of life. Each artist takes on a contemporary approach to traditionally feminine subjects and forms — interiors, domesticity, self-reflection; florals, pastels, handicraft — to explore and critique this identity. Craft traditions are increasingly embraced by artists who adopt handmade forms, updating them with contemporary concepts and content. Artists Erin M. Riley and Martha Tuttle each take a different approah to fiber-based art and offer unique, fresh perspectives.

On view at Dorsky Gallery  

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Sep
28
6:00 PM18:00

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa Terráqueo

Rosa                                                                                                                                            Pink color.(noun, Spanish)

Terráqueo                                                                                                                                From planet Earth or related to it. (adjective, Spanish)

Besides being powerful color sources, plants can also reveal different properties of the water used, as the colors they yield will shift depending on the alkalinity and hardness of the water they are paired with.

Rosa Terráqueo is a textile exploration of water quality through the lens of botanical dyes. Avocado seeds and a variety of water samples, each with its own level of alkalinity and mineral content, were used to produce a spectrum of pink tones.

The project was inspired by the wide range of pink hues obtained in a series of avocado dye workshops conducted across Europe in the summer of 2017 by Fragmentario.

Upon returning to Brooklyn, experiments began  in order to reproduce the water of various locations using household materials, such as lime and salts to transform the soft, neutral water of New York into a variety of harder, basic and acidic waters. A network of collaborators also provided water samples from around the world– Colombia, France, Greece, India, Japan, Mexico, among others– which were used to map the range of avocado pink hues.

Both experiments were integral in understanding how different markers of water quality affected color. The results were used to infuse a range of hues onto the silk fabrics of the collection.

Rosa Terráqueo seeks to visually illustrate  the significance of water quality and to question how these variables affect our environments and ourselves. Its name is a nod to the global nature of the waters used for the project and the diverse pink hues obtained with  them.

 

Fragmentario

Before the mid-nineteenth century, plants and other natural sources were used across all cultures to color fiber. After the discovery of synthetic dyes, natural dyes were quickly replaced and an important part of civilization was forgotten. Fragmentario seeks to explore natural dyes in a modern context and inspire conversations about cultural heritage and collective memory. 

Fragmentario was founded in Brooklyn in 2016 by Maria Elena Pombo, a fashion design graduate from Parsons School of Design who has worked at Michael Kors and other New York based designers.

Rosa Terráqueo, an accompanying presentation, will be held at A/D/O on 8/28/18 to showcase the ranges of colors achieved with avocado seeds on textiles and clothing.

 RSVP contact info@fragmentario.co

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Sep
28
11:00 AM11:00

Traditional Modern

  • Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator (map)
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Traditional Modern

In this day long, walk-in exhibition, we will be presenting the beautiful handwork from the valleys of Kashmir, the impeccable craftsmanship from the bylanes of Uttar Pradesh and the adornment cultures from the deserts of Gujarat. The folklore of the artisan women from these regions will be further unfolded in the videos and images capturing their clanking bangles and pleasant voices while they sing and precariously embroider the patterns on the cloth.

This display of colorful textiles from the Marasim textile craft library, will be representing that thing of beauty that is a joy forever- showcasing our innovations in the traditional techniques of weaving, felting, embroidering and printing from Gujarat, Jammu & Kashmir and Uttar Pradesh regions of India. Namely- Tangaliya and Patan Patola weaving from Gujarat, Daraz and Mukaish work from Lucknow, Gara and aari embroidery from Gujarat. Sojni and Namdah from Jammu & Kamshmir and many more. You are welcome to sit and watch the videos,  touch and feel the textiles, interact and ask questions. 

Established by Nidhi Garg Allen, a Parsons School of Design graduate and a technologist turned into a fashion Artisan Entrepreneur, Marasim is a NYC based company providing artisanal consultancy, sourcing and manufacturing services to the home, fashion, interior and accessory designers.

There are 10 MM skilled grassroots artisans around the world. Most of them are women. These highly skilled artisans are a part of the world’s biggest untapped and unorganized craft sector. 

Marasim organizes the craft sector- creating opportunities for the millions of artisans at the grassroots. And empowering the designers with the information on processes and cultures associated with various craft techniques and enabling them to collaborate and innovate with the artisans using the lingua franca of design.

This exhibition would not have been possible without the venue support from the very kind Brooklyn fashion and Design Accelerator team.

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Sep
27
to Sep 29

Continuation of Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

  • The Stone Barns Center (map)
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Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by The Stone Barns Center, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 27th to September 30th on view at The Stone Barns Center

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Sep
24
to Sep 30

Josh Faught At MAD

Josh Faught At MAD

Featured in the Museum of Arts and Design’s exhibitions, #MADCollects and the #BurkePrize, Josh Faught (@hjfaught) combines textiles and fiber with found cultural objects to create highly ornamented works that weave together personal and social narratives exploring the history of the queer body. See Josh’s works in ‘MAD Collects: The Future of Craft Part 1’ and ‘The Burke Prize: The Future of Craft Part 2’ at @MADMuseum.  

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Sep
22
to Sep 24

Claudy Jongstra's Immersive Nomadic Art Installation- Woven Skin

Woven Skin

The U.S. premiere of internationally renowned textile artist Claudy Jongstra's immersive nomadic art installation, WOVEN SKIN.

Presented by the A/D/O, the monumental sculpture is composed of 60 natural wool artworks from Jongstra's indigenous flock of Drenthe Heath Sheep, saturated with brilliant pigment from extensive natural dye research of madder root, grown in the Studio's own small-scale biodynamic farm in the Northern Netherlands. Each artwork is stretched onto a modular steel armature in a confluence of primal and modernist architectural impulse. 

The exhibit will run from September 22th to September 24th on view at A/D/O 29 Norman Ave. Brooklyn, NY.

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

THREE WALLS AIR 9 Final Exhibition

The Textile Arts Center is pleased to present Three Walls, the culminating exhibition of the 9th cycle of Artists in Residence.  

During the nine months residency, the eight artists worked alone, together. Their studios comprised only 3 walls; the lack of a fourth wall necessitated that their practices be shared and that their work inspired and conversed with each other.

Sculptural eyes seem to read hidden hand woven messages; a quilt designed to be worn meets a fiber depiction of a body, both crafted to protect; garments that research the dynamic relationship between maker/wearer and explore the complexities of function/value; and found images, layered and transformed, turn into paintings, while found materials are repurposed into sculptures.

The  artists in Three Walls come from a range of creative backgrounds, and the collective body of work featured reflects this variety of experience. However there’s a sense of unity. An empathetic identification. In concept, form, and process, they are companions.

Artists in Three Walls are Jamie Boyle, Rhonda Khalifeh, Junyu Li, Lily Moebes, Meghan O'Sullivan, Cory Siegler, Hannah Whelan and Chang Yuchen.

OPENING RECEPTION: September 20, 6-9pm
ARTIST TALK: September 23, 7pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 23

2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

  • 40 Ludlow Street New York, NY, 10002 United States (map)
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2018 Piecework Collective Exhibition

Piecework Collective brings together artists from around the world, using unique aesthetics, processes, and materials to explore traditional patchwork and quilting. The Collective exists as a means to showcase work by contemporary artists - united by a love of the art form, a sense of community, and its connection to history - in order to communicate and strengthen the value of textiles and craftsmanship. The goal of the Collective is to inspire, educate, and foster community through art.

The 2018 Piecework Collective exhibition will feature new work from:  ace&jig, Abigail Booth of Forest + Found, Lindsay Degen of DEGEN, Season Evans, Coulter Fussell of YaloRUN Textiles, Lesley Gold, Ruby Hoppen, Lucia Lienhard-Giesigner of Bosna Quilt Werstatt, Lauren MacDonald of Working Cloth, Lorena Marañon,Kiva Motnyk of Thompson Street Studio, Kyle Parent of KTWP Quilts, and 

opening reception: Thursday, Sept 20th, 6-10pm

Meet the artists Sunday, September 23, 1pm-3pm

 

Friday, Sept 21, 11am-6pm

Saturday, Sept 22, 11am-6pm

Sunday, Sept 23, 11am-6pm

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Sep
20
to Sep 30

Liz Collins: Rays

Liz Collins: Rays

Launched in spring 2018, 1ST SITE is a project space located in MAD’s reception area, dedicated to works that interact with and interpret the interior architecture and ambiance of the entry. This fall, the space will house an installation by Liz Collins, an artist included in the Museum’s permanent collection. The installation is drawn from Collins’ “Rays” wallpaper series, the design of which she completed during her 2015 residency in the MAD Artist Studios Program.

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Sep
18
to Oct 4

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Crafting Change Exhibition: New Textile Work by Students and Faculty

Opening Reception, September 20th at 6:00 pm

The work of FIT students and faculty takes center stage in the Gallery FIT exhibition Crafting Change. Organized by the Textile/Surface Design Department in conjunction with New York Textile Month, the works featured in Crafting Change use long established techniques in a modern context to explore the shifting boundaries between art, design, and technology. The use of hand crafting techniques combined with digital processes, preserves tradition while pushing textiles into the future.  Projects bridging science and textiles have the potential to revolutionize the fashion and textile industries, leading us to a more sustainable world. These works are promising examples of how FIT is successfully encouraging interdisciplinary mergers between craft, technology, and sustainability to usher textile arts into the 21st century.

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Sep
17
to Sep 21

Talant! Showcasing The Finalists For The Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Talent! exhibit showcasing the finalists for the Dorothy Waxman Textile Prize

Mohawk proudly sponsors this prize to support emerging textile designers

Trend forecaster Li Edelkoort and fellow curator Philip Fimmano are pleased to announce the creation of a new international design prize to be awarded to a textile or fashion design student who exhibits innovative thinking and inspiring creativity in textiles.

The Dorothy Waxman Textile Design Prize honors Dorothy Waxman, the original driving force behind Trend Union and EDELKOORT INC. in the United States and contributing reporter to the magazines View on Colour, Textile View and Viewpoint. Waxman’s insatiable curiosity and discerning eye for the avant-garde has inspired Edelkoort and her team for decades. Waxman also introduced the American fashion industry to European textile partners with her work at the Fashion Group. As an avid textile aficionado, she believes that creative fabrics can change the design landscape in profound ways.

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Sep
15
to Sep 30

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Pratt School Of Design Presents: Textile Thinking

Conversations On Textiles At The School Of Design, Pratt Institute

This exhibition will highlight the vibrant and provocative conversations that the faculty and
students of the School of Design participate in while interrogating textiles. The field of
textiles is a wellspring of inspiration to both the fashion, product and interior design
program’s material explorations and theoretical thinking.

As they work outside of the academic structure of a traditional textile program, the
students and faculty at the School of Design bring energy, focus and a pragmatic naiveté
to the subject of textiles. The exhibition will illustrate this conversation through student
course work and selected professors’ theoretical and professional endeavors relating to
textiles.

Opening hours: 11AM-6PM

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Sep
15
12:00 PM12:00

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

Textile Design Pop-Up Exhibition by Jefferson Textile Designers

The Lori Weitzner Design studio is hosting a one-day, pop-up exhibition of imaginative work created by Textile Design students from Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University). The curated designs showcase undergraduate and graduate Textile Designers’ innovations, highlighting the marriage of artisanal processes and the latest technologies. Sustainability, international cultures and maker spaces are emphasized. Join alumni, faculty and students for this exclusive look into the Jefferson Textile Design Bachelor of Science and Master of Science programs.

12pm - 1pm

2pm-3pm

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Sep
13
to Dec 14

From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

  • Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College (map)
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 From the Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles by Gail Rothschild and Caroline Wells Chandler

Opening Reception September 13, 6-8pm

This exhibition, FROM THE DESERT TO THE CITY: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles,  places textiles from Late Antique Egypt in multiple contexts—their original use in the 3rd-7th centuries, their rediscovery in the early 20th century, and their reception in the present day—bringing these colorful remnants of the ancient past to life for today’s audiences.

Centering on the recent gift of 85 textile pieces from the Rose Choron Collection, the exhibition features other works from the Museum’s permanent collection together with loans from the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Opera Archives, and private collections. Works by contemporary artists Caroline Wells Chandler and Gail Rothschild bring the story of the textiles into the 21st century. 

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Sep
10
10:00 AM10:00

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Bernie Leahy - Why Are We

Mid-Career Solo Exhibition
Drawing and Sculpture with Stitch

Through her art practice, internationally celebrated Dublin artist Bernie Leahy picks apart visceral human connections, finding and laying bare the vulnerability in each chosen subject  matter. In this exhibition, Leahy has created an evocative series of stitched drawings and small sculptures, embodied with a variety of media including gold leaf, uncut diamonds and acrylic on linen and canvas. Fragments of the human form—eyes, mouths, glances—capture Leahy’s personal moments and stories and imbues them with a sense of passion and energy.

Her work plays many emotional chords, there is a common thread of kindness and humanity behind all the piecesIrish Arts Review Magazine

Prolific and brave in her use of materials – Dr. Audrey Whitty, National Museum of Ireland

September  10 - December  14  
Gallery  hours  by  appointment    
Monday  –  Friday  |  10  AM  –  6  PM    
Please  call  212-757-3318
 

Artist  Talk  &  Reception  
Monday September  10  
5:30  PM
FREE
Reservations  Encouraged

AT IRISH ARTS CENTER

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Sep
7
to Sep 30

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color

The Museum at FIT presents Pink: The History of a Punk, Pretty, Powerful Color (September 7, 2018–January 5, 2019), organized by the museum’s director and chief curator, Dr. Valerie Steele. Pink features approximately 80 ensembles from the 18th century to the present, with examples by designers and brands such as Elsa Schiaparelli, Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Alessandro Michele of Gucci, Jeremy Scott of Moschino, and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons. The exhibition will be accompanied by a book published by Thames & Hudson and a free symposium on October 19, 2018, that will be livestreamed.

Pink provokes exceptionally strong feelings of both attraction and repulsion. Indeed, it has been called the most divisive of colors. “Please, sisters, back away from the pink,” urged journalist Petula Dvorak in The Washington Post when she learned that tens of thousands of protesters were planning to wear pink pussy hats at the Women’s March of 2017. The issues facing women are “serious,” she added, and “cute” pink hats risked trivializing these issues. Yet attitudes towards pink are changing, and the color is increasingly regarded as cool and androgynous. 

 

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Comme des Garçons, ensemble, Fall 2016, “18th -Century Punk” Collection, Fall/Winter 2016, Japan, museum purchase.

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Sep
5
to Sep 30

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins - Conduition

Liz Collins' exhibition, Conduition is an iteration of her dynamic visual language, one in which she explores new materials, hybridizes design with sculptural objects, and experiments with scale. Through Collins' use of texture, material, and vibrant color, she generates evocative flows, fields, and vibrations. Her formal and conceptual elements suggest how liquid  landscapes function as energy conduits across a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional works. Among the works on view is a twenty-foot long jacquard woven landscape based on ancient story scrolls, in which a continuous narrative is told across one expansive piece. In addition, Collins' exhibition includes a variety of sculptures made of glass and found objects, and textile paintings made from stretched woven fabrics.

Opening on Wednesday, September 5th from 6-8 pm.
Gallery hours: Wednesday through Sunday from 11-6 pm

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Sep
5
to Sep 24

Interlaced At Textile Arts Center

Interlaced Exhibition

Opening Reception: September 5, 6-9pm

Viewing Hours: Saturday - Thursday, 11 am - 6pm (Closed Fridays), and by appointment.

In honor of New York Textile Month, the Textile Arts Center is hosting a collection of exhibitions to highlight the richness of contemporary textiles. Reflecting a diversity of material and technique, "Interlaced" features site-specific installation as well as sculpture, collage, weaving, knitting and embroidery. 

Exhibitions Include:

“Evolution: Ursus americanus” featuring the work of Deborah Simon

“The Gloaming” featuring the work of Megan C. Mosholder

“The Quilted Object” featuring the work of Hannah Goff, Monica Hofstadter, Liz Robb and Pedro Silva

“Rapture of the Deep: The Textile Art of Tzuri Gueta” featuring work by Tzuri Gueta and curated by Ya’ara Keydar

For Inquiries: Tegan Roberts at tegan@textileartscenter.com

Tzuri Gueta Photograph by Carole Desheulles c.JPG
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